Worm eggs

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Thermopkt, May 17, 2008.

  1. Thermopkt

    Thermopkt New Member

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    Is this anything? Also, how many worm eggs can you find before you know you have problem?
    [​IMG]
     
  2. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    The pic looks very suspect to me, but would rather Kaye or somebody else to take a shot a guessing it.

    Looking for eggs .......
    I generally don't get too excited about finding a half a dozen of this or that over about a 1in X 1in area in my older goats. It's the young goats that I watch more closely. I ran fecals for somebody the other day, and before I ever moved the slide, I was looking at 6 cocci on the first glance. I started loosing count as I was starting to scan...as the count got up to 60 or 70, and I wasn't even close to being done looking. These goats were in trouble. Now this was a no brainer, and I highly suggested that they put them on corid ASAP.
    As you kinda do regular fecals on you herd, take notes on what you see with each goat. Some of your older goats can carry a few of this or that, and it is considered "normal" here unless that goats appears to be falling off, or general appearance just don't suite me.
    As you run your fecals, you will come to expect to see this or that in each particular animal, and becomes to be normal for them. Now, if you see a big change in numbers the next time that you check that animal, then you should re-check that animal again within a day or two. If the numbers are still higher than normal, or are coming up, then you should consider treatment.
    With that said....it's really your younger animals (one year old and less) that can get in trouble fast. If you see something that looks suspect (more than just one here and there on a fecal) then be sure to check them again in a day or two......and then be prepared to act immediately on it if needed.
    With ND's....it appears that there is a window between weaning, and about 6 months old that tends to be a critical time for having true illness or damage from worms and cocci. ....after about 9 months old, my knee jerk reaction to finding something, becomes a little less here.

    Each area, each breed of goat, and each form of resistant worm or cocci, will pose you a different problem to deal with. Do your fecals regular....keep notes on numbers with each goat.....compare those numbers to how well that goats overall health is. You will find a pattern that is "normal", and then you will be able to readily recognize a red flag when it pops up at your place.
    ....and last of all, when you do take action (treatment)....then re-check that animal(s) to see if the treatment is working. Running fecals walk hand in hand with treatments.
    I use my micro as a management tool in my older (adult) animals, and as a diagnostic tool in my younger ones.

    I know this reply looks a little scatter brained, but as you run more fecals, you will learn what to expect to see, and you will learn to identify a problem when it occurs. Don't ever wait for a goat to get sick before running fecals....otherwise, you won't know what is considered OK when all is well.

    Whim
     

  3. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    It is coccidia oocysts.
    What Whim said.
    Kaye
     
  4. Thermopkt

    Thermopkt New Member

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    Thanks all! I wasn't sure, as all the pics I have made the coccidia oocysts look more elongated. More oval than round.
     
  5. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    There are several different types of coccidia....some oval, some round. To me...coccidia is coccidia, does the same damage and most of the meds. get several types anyway.

    A round worm egg would have a darker more pronounced center.
    Kaye