wiggly kids...

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by CarlinsDarlin, May 29, 2008.

  1. CarlinsDarlin

    CarlinsDarlin Guest

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    And no, I'm not talking about my 8 year old who can't sit still in church :biggrin

    Is there a trick or technique you can tell me, or is it even possible, for one person to hold and manage to administer meds, trim feet, etc., on kids?

    Keep in mind that mine are dam raised, but are played with every single day. They will let you pick them up and hold them with no problems, but if you start trying to stuff things in their mouths, watch out. And I have NO idea how to trim feet without DH holding them.... an itty bitty milkstand? :biggrin

    I need to start Spice's babies on coccidia prevention today and there is NO way I can tape measure them to get an accurate weight till DH gets home tonight. Thankfully he said he'll help with that and giving them their meds tonight. But I know it won't be long before he starts complaining. And I really need to start trimming feet...

    Do I need to hire a farm hand? :)
    Kathy
     
  2. Jo@LaudoDeumFarm

    [email protected] New Member

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    Get a collar on them and clip them to a fence. Put them between your knees to hold them still.
     

  3. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    I lay them on the ground and sit on them (not full weight) to trim feet I stand on top of them holding between my legs to administer meds or clip to a fence as Jo said.
     
  4. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    You need one of those Susanne Sommer thigh masters! I put them between my knees and squeeze to give oral meds. Turned around I do the same to trim feet. Once a little older my milkstand is adjustable enough that I can keep their head in at about 2 months old. vicki
     
  5. Legend Hills

    Legend Hills New Member

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    I put collars on mine and clip them to the fence even when very young. (three weeks is the time I put one on my dam raised wether. It works really well too. ;)
     
  6. CarlinsDarlin

    CarlinsDarlin Guest

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    :rofl
    LOL Vicki, I need one of those things for more reasons than kids! :biggrin

    Thanks everyone for the advice.
    DH did as he promised and helped with administering coccidia meds, wormers, and we trimmed 3 of the 6 kids' feet tonight, too. Tomorrow on day two of the meds, we'll trim the other three. It didn't take too long, so maybe he'll continue to help for a while. I do have a collar on my new little buckling, but the babies don't have theirs yet. Guess I'll go get them one this weekend.

    I'm afraid, Sondra, if I sat on them, I'd end up with kid pancakes :). My granddad used to say, "There's nothing wrong with a healthy woman. They keep you warm in winter, and shade you in the summer." :biggrin (after that my grandmother would hit him) ;)
    Kathy
     
  7. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    :rofl Love it. Well after next month I'll probably have plenty of shade. (quiting smoking) :help2
     
  8. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    :rofl You guys are just too funny!

    I use my knees... just like Vicki. Forward meds orally, reversed to inject, and pushed up against the fence to trim feet. I wouldn't know how to do anything if I had help! I'd probably inject someone besides the animal!
    I can even move from spot to spot with a kid held by the neck between my knees. NO, it's not something I'd enjoy anyone seeing...but, it WORKS! There's a joke that goes with it but I'll save myself blushing!!

    Besides, with this type of restraint EARLY, they learn not to fight the head stanchion.
    Kaye
     
  9. Chaty

    Chaty New Member

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    Yep early on I had to learn how to do it by myself also. It gets tricky sometimes and I still get stuck with the needle but I dont stop till I get it done. I use the fence alot when dealing with some of mine. and a collar, halter and a lead rope. IF you start the babies soon enough usually they dont fight ya as much.
     
  10. tmfinley

    tmfinley Member

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    My 9 year old helps me. I hold them with my knees and he helps keep their heads still. I homeschool ,though, so him and his brother are around all day to help me!

    Tiffany
     
  11. Legend Hills

    Legend Hills New Member

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    Like I said above I use collars and clip them to the fence, except..............when feeding oral meds. Then I stand beside them, get them in a headlock (sort of) with my elbow and lift there heads with the same hand. With the other I pop in the (needleless) syringe and TA DA, it is pushed in to the back of the mouth/throat and squeezed. Quickly for a little bit or two or three short busts for a lot so they can swallow without choking. :D


    When they are really little, yes I straddle them too. But mine are getting a little big. :lol
     
  12. Anita Martin

    Anita Martin Senior Member

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    I still straddle my buck for meds. :biggrin Luckily he likes me and doesn't run off to the other end of the pasture with me.
    Anita
     
  13. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    Actually, in my herd, the dam raised kids are sometimes easier to medicate than the bottle kids. Once I manage to catch them, they are sort of in a state of surprise and I can give that shot or oral med before they figure out what I'm up to.It's the bottle kids that want to squirm. I do like the others do and get them between my knees, or with smaller kids. I've put one foot on a fence rail and put the kid over my leg to treat it. For show grooming, my friend has a stanchion with a lower head catch, and since we travel in her rig, I just take the kids to her place to groom them before the show. We also help each other hold stubborn goats. Kathie