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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok-- when we first got our goats, we had a little freak out when we first saw that they didn't have top teeth. Not major, but enough to wonder why the heck it wasn't in the books we read. I mean really - that dental pad thing is bizarre.

Today I had a freak out when my SIL asked why one of our yearlings had no front teeth. No one ever mentions losing baby teeth!! And at 13 months?! I almost had a panic attack when two yearlings had the smile of a six year old human child.

Yeah--- I'll admit my ineptitudes. Did everyone else just know this stuff???? :really :blush
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No-- I looked at their ADGA papers!!! :shrug2
 

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I didn't learn about goat's teeth in a book, but I did know about them before I bought my first goats. I was introduced to goats when my DH got a job milking on a goat dairy. The woman later hired me and taught me all sorts of things about goats including about their teeth. I actually think she does have a book with info on goat teeth and telling their age by them. I'll try and remember to ask her what book that is. Kathie
 

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I remember a argument with a lady who insisted that her goats were "very old" because they didn't have their front teeth... :biggrin

No ruminants have upper, front teeth. This is part of what distinguishes a ruminant from other animals. If I remember correctly, Alpalcas, lamaas ect are not ruminants, even though they do chew cud. I can't remember now if they have upper teeth or not.
 

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A ruminant is any artiodactyl mammal that digests its food in two steps, first by eating the raw material and regurgitating a semi-digested form known as cud from within their first stomach, known as the rumen. The process of again chewing the cud to break down the plant matter and stimulate digestion is called ruminating. Ruminants include cattle, goats, sheep, camels, alpacas, llamas, giraffes, American Bison, European bison, yaks, water buffalo, deer, wildebeest and antelope. The suborder Ruminantia includes all those except the camels and llamas, which are Tylopoda. Ruminants also share another anatomical feature in that they all have an even number of toes.

The camel has 22 milk teeth and 32 permanent teeth. It is different to other ruminants in having two front teeth in the upper jaw. Camels also have a pair of canine (dog teeth) in both the upper and lower jaws which are used to crush woody plants for food.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Sondra...you're a walking encyclopedia!! :)

But still - the losing baby teeth at 1 yr. really got me. Y'all would have laughed if you'd seen me go pale. I started wondering what was wrong, how she'd be able to eat, yadda yadda yadda... I'm a nerd.
 

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You just were never mentored by a really good goat mentor :) LOL!!!! Most people leave here in goat overload......Vicki
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
That's why it's so funny. I mean...the things we DO know about goats. Sheesh.
I guess we know the important stuff - and no one thinks to mention stuff like this.
 

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funny thing is here any visiters at all know that goats don't have upper teeth cause the little devils are always chewing on peoples cloths etc so tell them right off that they might get a little pinch but that they don't have upper teeth so cant bite . but HEY don't stick your finger in the back. :)
 
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