What would happen if

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Keeperofmany, Apr 13, 2008.

  1. Keeperofmany

    Keeperofmany New Member

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    you had a milking doe that you are milking and she got bred and you didn't know it and she had not been dried off? I taking it that there would not be colostrum for the baby or babies would there? What other bad effects would there be if this were to happen? :?

    Wendy
     
  2. stacy adams

    stacy adams New Member

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    Well, that kinda happened to me when the buck got out last year.. didn't think anyone was in heat! Well, she milked steadily for a while and then just dried up.. well, when she got down to giving only 1/2 cup, I figured something was up and quit milking her. She kidded about 50 days later. I would think that your doe would dry up on her own prior to kidding.. has she had them?
    You do pose an interesting question though, if she didn't go dry.
     

  3. Keeperofmany

    Keeperofmany New Member

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    My doe is milking really well. she gives me a about a quart a day. She was never a big milker before I bought her last November.Doesn't seem to be any decrease. She is 1/2 saanen and 1/2 nubian and is quite short but very wide. She gets 1 lb of grain a day, 1 cup of BOSS and a sprinkle of kelp with her grain divided into two feedings, and 3 lb alfalfa pellets. She has free choice 1:1 dairy cattle mineral and baking soda.Their hay is a nice canary grass. I'm thinking it was about the middle of January when she let the buck out!!!
    She was really wide when I bought her and she is still wide. I really don't want to dry her up if she is not bred. Hoping then that she will decrease her milk production if she is pregant.
     
  4. Shykid Acres

    Shykid Acres Guest

    Biotracking is a very good option for determining if she truely is preg. or not. That way you will have peace of mind about the milk thing by knowing for sure.

    -Kim
     
  5. Good Goats

    Good Goats New Member

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    I would just keep milking her, and she will probably dry up on you if she is bred. Some does milk all the way through from one kidding to the next, and their milk changes to colostrum before they kid.
     
  6. CarlinsDarlin

    CarlinsDarlin Guest

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    That's exactly what happened here this year. I bought a doe in October as already freshened. When I got her she was giving about a half gallon a day - she was a first freshener and had had a single doeling, so I wasn't expecting a lot of milk. My plan was to breed her in the fall or winter for this spring. Well, a few weeks after she got here, she got to the point where I was getting about a pint of milk twice a day... then a half pint. So I just quit milking her and let her dry up.

    Her udder never did go away (I was told, sometimes it just takes time)... and then it started getting bigger... and so did she! That's when we realized she was pregnant! It seems that the buck had gotten into her area in August. Thankfully the previous owner had made a note of it in case anyone ended up bred. She checked her notes and determined a due date. By the time I had confirmed she was pregnant, we only had about one week to panic before the babies got here. :) Which, looking back, was a good thing, since she was my first kidding. I probably would have worried to death over her.

    Now we have two more due in May, and I'm a little more relaxed about it... just a little! :crazy
    Kathy