Vaccinating my kids

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by Kashe Hardman, Dec 3, 2017.

  1. Kashe Hardman

    Kashe Hardman New Member

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    Hello!!!
    We are new to the goat world, but loving every minute of it. Our kids begged for goats and so we gave in about two months ago. We have two little bucks that are now three months old. They are doing very well with bottle feeding, as well as alfalfa and grazing. I’m pretty sure they are dogs as they spend a lot of time with our dogs. I never knew I’d love this little kids so much.
    I am wondering when I should deworm and vaccinate my guys. Do they need more than just a tetanus? I’d really appreciate some thoughts so we can keep these little guys happy and healthy
     
  2. greenTgoats

    greenTgoats New Member

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    Most breeders give all kids cocci treatment and CDT.
     

  3. Rachel

    Rachel New Member

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    Off topic , but careful with the alfalfa! Bucks can get kidney problems very easily with too much calcium rich foods, like alfalfa. Their dietary needs are different from does, especially lactating does (most feed threads on this forum are for does in milk). Try feeding your bucks grass hay instead, like Timothy or Orchard (also probably cheaper) though if your pasture and roughage options are good, they should not need feed supplements at all.
     
  4. greenTgoats

    greenTgoats New Member

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    That is actually an older idea and has been proven false. Calcium is a much needed part of males' diets. I have given my males free choice alfalfa for years and haven't had a single case of UC.
     
  5. Rachel

    Rachel New Member

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    My vet was the one who advised me to stop feeding alfalfa to my bucks and even mentioned that he has seen debilitating cases in bucks as young as 5 months. Why do you think its proven false, other than your personal experience?
     
  6. greenTgoats

    greenTgoats New Member

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    Vets are often misleading when it comes to goats. They rarely have much real info.

    Stones are caused by too much phosphorous and too little calcium. The ideal balance is somewhere between 2:1 and 4:1 calcium : phosphorous. Less calcium, and urinary calculi becomes a problem.

    The stones are made out of the excess phosphorous that has crystallized in the urine, though they are coated in a layer of calcium carbonate. When vets take the time to test the stones, they see the calcium coating and assumes the cause of the stones is too much calcium in the goat's diet. The vet usually doesn't see the ill effects too little calcium causes later on.