udder cream or balm?

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by tiger408, Aug 23, 2008.

  1. tiger408

    tiger408 Guest

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    Hi,

    I just recently got a dairy goat. I have been using teat dip and cleaning her teats and udder well before and after milking. I also wear gloves when milking. Is there anything I can use to help keep her from getting chapped skin? I have read not to use things like Bag Balm or anything petroleum based as these types can lead to staph infections. What can I safely use? Either store bought or home made?

    Thanks
     
  2. mill-valley

    mill-valley New Member

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    I have had a lot of problems with chapped teats in the past. I blamed it on the udder wash/teat dip I was using. I switched to using baby wipes (brand doesn't seem to matter) and an iodine based dip and have had no problems at all this year. I never found balms/creams to be that effective, just didn't seem to help much.
     

  3. tiger408

    tiger408 Guest

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    I'll try your suggestions... I wonder if the baby wipes help because they contain lanolin? or aloe? ... been ages since I have had to buy baby wipes LOL
     
  4. new2goats

    new2goats Guest

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    Nope..no lanolin...I use Baby Wipes on my Hairless Chinese Cresteds and the hairless ones are sensitive to ANYTHING with lanolin so I've become pretty cautious and watch out for lanolin products.. They do however have aloe in them. :)

    I don't have any goats so don't take my advice on anything but I wonder if pure aloe vera gel would work?? I'm not talking the sunburn stuff from Wal-Mart...just the pure aloe gel that has no additives, colors ect. ect that you buy at the health food store? I buy it for my pale hairless girl because she's very prone to breakouts and the pure aloe gel is the only thing I can put on her that moisturizes properly without clogging her pores.

    I'm eager to see all the replies in this thread as I'm sure the info will be super handy to me in the future :)
     
  5. Anita Martin

    Anita Martin Senior Member

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    I'm probably pretty lucky, but I've only used a mild udder wash that I make myself. I put some water in a spray bottle with about 2 drops of dish detergent and some tea tree oil, lavender, etc. I use this with a paper towel to wash teats, and after I am done milking, I sometimes spray with Fightback, but mostly forget. Most of my milk is going to feed dogs and chickens, and we arn't selling any of it. We do drink it and make cheese however. I also milk into a plastic pail that I sometimes wash with bleach. I know this would never work if I were going to market my milk, but I am really surprised at how not one of my girls has ever had mastitis, or chapped teats, etc. When I spray Fightback on, I usually wipe it back off because I worry that the wetness will cause chapping, which is why I don't use a dip, (but I'm sure I need to). I used to visit dairy farms in Oregon, and it seems like lots of the cows had chapped udder problems, which I attributed to the hoseing and dipping of the udders before and after milking. Don't listen to me here, just chiming in with my limited experience....and I too am wondering how to do udder washing "properly" for next year, when I plan to market my milk on a very small scale.
    Anita
     
  6. Jo@LaudoDeumFarm

    [email protected] New Member

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    Anita the most important thing an udder wash will do is get the organic matter, and dirt off the udder and prevent it from falling in the milk. Washing and drying the udder is important for the quality of the milk and to remove any bacteria from the teat end which could end up giving the goat mastitis. It's also important to clip the hair from the udder.

    Teat dips are important for the goats health. Udder washes and teat dips work together to remove any harmful bacteria that can cause mastitis. There are a number of nice dips on the market. There are even organic ones. It is an important step to keeping the goat healthy and your milk clean.

    If you can't handle bleach, then use a mild soap and wash the udder and dry it. Don't milk until the udder is dry, and then use a dip on the ends after you are done. If the animal has dry skin they may need more oils in their diet. Avoid putting heavy balms on the goats skin. I have used crisco, or shea butter before when we were having to deal with severe chapping. Both of these soak in without putting a layer of fat on the udder that could trap bacteria against the skin.
     
  7. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Vinegar and water is also great for wash but I just use 1/4 cup clorox to 1 gal water
     
  8. chewie

    chewie New Member

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    i use an old large spice jar, about 5 inches long by about 3 inches round. the teats fit great in this. i put water in it, then a splash of clorox, not the off brands, and have yet to have any troubles with this. i wash with it and dip afterwards
     
  9. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    I have, on rare occasions, used bag balm on does with extremely chapped, cracked skin on their teats. I applied it sparingly to the affected teat and massaged it in while milking, then followed with FightBac after milking. Generally, though, my does don't have problems with chapped teats, even in our cold Montana winters. I clean the udder with baby wipes and then use chlorhexadine after milking. Kathie
     
  10. Haglerfarm

    Haglerfarm New Member

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    I use a powdered teat dip called Winterset. I love it. I have used it for over 2 years now. It has Comfrey in it and clorohexidine. It is wonderful and was intended for winter use. But, I and some others use it year round. Works really well.
    My does that nursed kids this year got chapped teats at first as they had never nursed kids before. I keep Corona balm on hand. I have used it for years for all sorts of things, including my hands. I used it on horses with injuries. It soaks into the skin and softens very quickly. I buy it in the tube so I always get clean balm to use rather than the tub.
    But, if I were still using a liquid kind it would be iodine based.
    Leslie Sensing