Turning excess milk into profit.

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Tim Pruitt, Jan 8, 2008.

  1. kidsngarden

    kidsngarden New Member

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    My chickens get layer pellets and excess milk in a seperate feeder. They are also very free range so they get green stuff and bugs all the time.
    I use commercial pig grain feed in addition to milk and scraps. Butcher at 6 months. We aren't doing pigs for awhile because we want to focus more on goats. Feeding commercial feed is very expensive - essentially just got our own meat butchered and fed for free after raising 5 and selling 4. We tried feeding spent grain and supplementing it with corn once. That was NASTY gamey meat! I want to do it again and find a bakery or something and feed a bit of grain and their leftovers and milk.

    Bethany
     
  2. Our calves are ususally trained to bucket by one or two weeks old. I've found they train more easily if put over at two weeks old.
    Bottle holders also save a lot of time.
    Most of our bull calves end up in the hands of dairy goat owners around here when I sell off the farm. No complaints yet. All healthy and have done well. I have not heard of a single one dieing...well, except the two that were over a month old each when sold (for $65 for the two I think it was) and the new owners didn't have proper shelter for them. They died of pnuemonia, but certainly not because they weren't well started. Those people came off our sell list pretty quick!

    I've considered pigs a couple of times but dad has usually said no and I've usually said no myself.
    I love the meat from pigs fed goat's milk. We bought a pig from the only licensed goat dairy left in Ohio a couple years back. I saw them when I visited her dairy. I could not stand the smell or the sound but those were some mighty happy pigs!
    What is now the goat pen was originally called the Pig pen so dad has experience with pigs..lol
    If we were to get pigs what would be a good breed to go after?
    My uncle sounded like he would be interested in raising a couple of pigs with me...lol
     

  3. Cotton Eyed Does

    Cotton Eyed Does New Member

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    We've raised pigs too. They usually turn into such pets (We eat them anyway though :/) One of them, Prissy Pig, had a toy dinosaur that was made out of that really hard plastic and it was about 18 inches long of so. She carried that dinasaur around with her everywhere. She slept with it. Talked to it like it was another pig. She would play hide and seek with you around the pig pen. Cutest little pink pig I ever saw. Grew up nicely too.
     
  4. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    We used to get two baby pigs each year right as we started freshening, we raised them on nothing but milk, bread from the store, you can get about 3 days of bread for two pigs for $5 here. My brother still gets it to feed to the hens (and my goats!!) They got all old milk, grain and hay from feeders cleaned every Saturday and a shovel full of dirt from the woods.

    I raised them in an old 4 horse trailer, just powerwashed it out each weekend, and moved it to a new place. The only way of raising them! We only kept them for about 4 months, started with 2 more as the next group of does freshened...plus dealing with 80 pound butchering hogs was much eaiser than 300 pounds.

    We raised blue butts for awhile, I loved them stupid pigs! Vicki
     
  5. Feral Nature

    Feral Nature Active Member

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    I love blue butts too just because of their name...and their blue butts.

    We have bought probably 4 or 5 beef calves from the local beef cattle auction over the years. They were split off their mammas and sold separate. They usually ran about $100. I would then spend a few dollars on prophylactic antibiotics per vet instruction since they came from the barn and I had other cattle. They always did well and i could either raise them on the bottle or put them on a nurse cow. In a few short months they would triple in value as a 300 pounder worth over $300. A "light" calf brings alot at the barn. So you could get 2, eat one and sell one.

    I agree that a calf with Brahma blood is insane and flighty as a deer. Stick with English breeds.
     
  6. Tracy in Idaho

    Tracy in Idaho Member

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    Yep, we butchered him last month. For us, dealing with them in the winter is not worth the extra 3-400# we would have put on him. AND, with the does drying up in preparation for kidding, it wasn't worth the effort. We're definitely planning on doing it again this year.

    I agree -- get them on a bucket asap -- we usually manage it by the second week they are here. It is a PAIN to deal with them on bottles. I had a friend who works for a pipe manufacturer cut me a big 24" pipe in half and cap the ends -- just a trough that we pour the milk in.

    Chickens -- no they still got their layer or grower, but I filled their water containers with milk :)

    Pigs get butchered at about 280-300# -- go by weight, not age, though they are probably in the 5-6 month old range. We like a bit more weight on them because we use the extra fat to mix with deer or elk burger.

    The pigs eat everything. Milk, extra eggs, scraps, grain left over from the milk stands, grain swept off the floor, garden produce or waste, and whatever grain is cheap at the feed store.
    (4-H pigs get commercial hog feed)

    Tracy
     
  7. wheytogosaanens

    wheytogosaanens New Member

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    What Tracy said...except that we feed our pigs ground grain from a farmer on the Palouse (10-12 cents/lb. 2007, which is a lot less than commercial feed, plus no weird additives).
    Pigs also love egg shells (like potato chips).

    Best pigs are the leftovers after the 4-H crowd gets done picking (usually the younger sets, which means they are usually ready to butcher in October, after the fair glut hits the butchers). York/Hamp crosses are nice (where you usually get your blue butts), Duroc crosses (generally a thicker pig), and we like a 3 way cross that includes Landrace, because they are tremendously long and you get more pork chops and bacon.

    Next Spring I am planning to feed my grown chickens ground oats mixed with minerals. Farmer 3 miles from me has been feeding his chickens this for some time. I figure that with the milk or protein and calcium we should save some $$ in feed. In the Spring and Summer our chickens free range. In the winter, they refuse to let their toes touch the snow!
     
  8. kidsngarden

    kidsngarden New Member

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    My favorite Breed of pig is duroc. Mostly because the gilt we held back for breeding was a Duroc and I loved her to death. (but never did get a boar to breed her so she was just a pet, really!) We called her ginger and she was just like a dog. So smart and would just come right up for a scratch. I couldn't bear to butcher her (she was too old anyway and would've been sausage) and it broke my heart to sell her.

    Bethany
     
  9. Feral Nature

    Feral Nature Active Member

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    Well I just firmed up the deal on my 2 spring pigs so I am all excited. We haven't raised pigs in a while so we are looking forward to the pork. Now would be a good time to buy another freezer.
     
  10. J-Basqo

    J-Basqo New Member

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    I havent had enough excess milk to raise market hogs or steer yet (but it is in the near future). I do however "BARF" feed my dogs ("Bones And Raw Food") to a certain extent (they get dog chow half of the time), but I feed them excess eggs, milk, and guts and trimmings, including the rabbit hides I dont use and feet and legs (in meal sized portions). I only have 3 dogs so it is not like it is a BIG savings but I still buy less food. My point being however even if that isnt some thing you find yourself doing, if you find a local dog breeder or working kennel (sled dogs and hounds etc) that BARF they will a lot of times (if they are not raising there own-and sometimes even if they are) will pay a couple $ a lb for a "goodie" bucket. I used to sell my rabbit gut buckets to a guy who had dogs.

    Also I havent done it recently but I plan to this freshening, is feed my rabbit fryers goats milk. When I was raising rabbits back home with my mom we used to soak left over bread heals (none of us kids would eat them back then) in milk and give it to the litters of bunnies.
    I would also think that if you didnt desire to raise meat creatures you could sell the left over/day old milk that would just be tossed for a small fee to a local Hog or Beef raiser.
    A friend of mine last year had so much extra milk she was giving it to the girls at the vets office I work at to raise their orphaned fawns, so leaving a message at your vets office could bring you some animal use buyers too. There it lots of ways to use the excess. Some if it may not make as "big" of a profit but it at least is not wasting it. :)
    Patina
     
  11. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    KJFarm:
    That's the only way I will deal with calves! Course, I've usually got from 5-7 going at a time on goat milk and Jersey has 3 on her. Those big colored buckets that hang over a fence, have measuring marks inside. I go down the pens-32'x 20'-one calf to a pen, one bar in a panel cut out for them to stick their heads through, bucket on outside of pen, 5 gallon bucket of milk...feeding is done in no time. Go back down the line with water hose, wash bucket out, hang on fence out of calves reach. Clean next time for feeding.

    Well....we just sent 4 dairy calves to the sale Mon. 1-holstein 785#-.55/#,1-brown swiss 845#-.75/#,1-Holst/jersey(all black) 715#-.88/# and one shorthorn 610#-.75#. Total check after commission-$2,155.78. These calves were all brought in as 3 days old on April 16th,07. There's 23 more head at different ages, in groups of 5-6 left in the steer pasture. Two Brangus that are going to butcher on Fri.(licking chops-FAT!!!)900-1,000#'s ea. My freezer and family's.
    That's a pretty good profit on $75 calves. They stayed here for 9-12 wks. on milk, then up to a pasture.
    Here right now, 600-800 calves are bringing the most money. It's usually the light weight calves 400-600 that bring the most per #. ?? I can't second guess feeder buyers. LOL...but the same buyer bought all 4 calves.Feedlot bound.

    I like dealing with the calves. They're big and pushy by the time they go to pasture away from the house. ;)
    Kaye
     
  12. I agree....use buckets when its possible. Makes things ALOT faster. I would change them to buckets at...OH...2 days old. The longer they was on the bottle the harder I found to put them on buckets. But, if you happen to get brown swiss calves....just give up and keep them on the bottle, they are HARD to get on a bucket. Kaye will agree with that point.

    The best to me to get the top money at market is Holstiens. The market on them is going strong right now till they change over the Cert. Angus Beef program....due around the middle of 09. Now, black holstiens are able to bypass the program and get into that market. Just a heads up on that.

    Ken in MI
     
  13. KJFarm

    KJFarm Senior Member

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    Calves are bringing good money right now. We just took 5 of our Beefmaster calves to the sale Monday. One heifer brought a $1.00#, the others brought from $.72# to .94#. These were just taken off the mamas about 2-3 weeks ago. No grain, just pasture and milk, the heaviest bull calf was 845#. I feed milk to my bottle calves for 3 months, they get pretty much as much as they want. Have 3 calves on my Jersey that are 6 weeks old, and they are getting huge.
     
  14. wheytogosaanens

    wheytogosaanens New Member

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    I do however "BARF" feed my dogs ("Bones And Raw Food") to a certain extent (they get dog chow half of the time), but I feed them excess eggs, milk, and guts and trimmings, including the rabbit hides I dont use and feet and legs (in meal sized portions).

    We also feed our placentas to the dogs, especially pregnant females or ones with pups. The stud dogs get next dibs, although we make sure that Kodiak, our neutered Pyrenees gets his fair share because he is "on" 24/7.

    'Tis a good time of year for the dogs!