Turkey fryer/pasteurizer question

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by goatkid, Mar 30, 2013.

  1. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

    2,730
    0
    0
    I've read on at least one forum about folks using an electric turkey fryer to pasteurize milk and even heat treat colostrum. I picked one up at work yesterday for $16. On the dial for the thermostat, all the marked settings are for way high temperatures. I know I can just turn the thing on to pasteurize and monitor the milk temp with my food thermometer, but I'm wondering where folks set it to bring it up and hold it at 135 or 165.
     
  2. Necie@Lunamojo

    Necie@Lunamojo Active Member

    1,436
    0
    36
    I think you just have to play with it to get it to hold between 135-140 for an hour. I use my fry-daddy and that's what I did. I marked the spot where I set it with a sharpie. It's in the *warm* zone before the actual temps that start at 250* or something. I still watch it, checking quite often. Every 10 minutes or so.
    For pasturizing, you really don't have to *set* the temp. I use stock pots as a double boiler and just turn the heat on with a thermometer in the milk. I check it every 15 minutes or so until it gets close to 150*, then check every 5 minutes. I just heat to 170* and turn off, then I know it's good to go. :)
     

  3. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

    2,730
    0
    0
    For pasteurizing, I do the pail in a stock pot for a double boiler on my stove. My DH complains if he thinks I'm using too much propane. My friend has one of those Weck canners she uses to pasteurize her milk. I wanted one of those, but they cost alot and I've heard of folks using the turkey fryer the same way. I know I can just turn it on and watch the milk, but I love how my friend can set her Weck to 170 and do other chores while the milk is pasteurizing. I was just hoping I can do the same with my fryer so I can get some other chores done while the milk is pasteurizing. I'm sure the cost of doing the milk is about the same regardless if I use our propane cook stove and the fryer, but I get my electric on budget billing and we have to buy our propane in bulk, so it's a big chunk of cash to come up with every time we have to fill the tank.
     
  4. LSP Farm

    LSP Farm New Member

    312
    0
    0
    We started using the turkey fryer and LOVE it! We use a stainless steel 2 gallon pale or stock pot. Fill your water according to how much milk you have. We just set it to 200 and stir it every now and then... I also leave my water as long as it stays clean.
    Sam
     
  5. informative

    informative New Member

    342
    0
    0
    Most people use the second 165ºF method - anything above that will tend to scorch the milk and below that will either require a lot of time or give some bacteria a chance to survive and reseed the batch thus shortening its freshness window. I've tried boiling a couple of times by getting distracted and not watching the thermometer and the flavor gets changed but it does stay fresh a good long time after like over a month in the fridge.

    145ºF 30 minutes Vat Pasteurization
    162ºF 15 seconds High temperature short time (HTST)
    212ºF 0.01 seconds Higher-Heat Shorter Time (HHST) (briefly boiling)
    280ºF 2.0 seconds Ultra Pasteurization (UP)
     
  6. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

    16,497
    0
    0
    Once you use it a few times you learn quickly how to. I set mine on high with water, then added the milk in a tote, putting a thermometer into it with a screeching alarm when it hit 170. Turned it off and kept the milk in, so it was warm during the day for feeding kids. By setting it for 170, it takes so much longer to heat your water and milk...this way by the time I was through straining and pouring milk and getting it in the freezer, and washing lambars, the milk was done.

    The goal shouldn't be to own a weck, the goal should be to have all your does with CAE negative testings, so you can quit all this...you so have been in goats long enough that it should be your goal. Vicki
     
  7. Greylady

    Greylady New Member

    760
    0
    0
    How long is long enough? If when buying all cae negative animals that have not been on your place, does this still apply?
     
  8. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

    2,730
    0
    0
    All my goats do have negative CAE tests. I just have a rule here that a goat can have his/her own dam's untreated milk, but I never feed pooled pasteurized milk. That way, if a doe ever did sero convert after a few years, I wouldn't have to worry about contaminating a whole year's kid crop of bottle babies. I don't expect my does to sero convert, but I do show and occasionally buy a new doe.
     
  9. Greylady

    Greylady New Member

    760
    0
    0
    Makes sense. So do you bottle feed all separately and for how long?

     
  10. fmg

    fmg New Member

    3,236
    0
    0
    This is how I feel too. It's probablyb how cae got so widespread...pooled raw milk. For mine, the kids are bottled raw colostrum and maybe up to 2 or 3 days of their dam's milk. I use pop bottles labeled with the dam's name that are thrown out after the kid is on the bucket feeder, and nipples always kept with that bottle, then bleached. Then, when they are being group fed, the kids are fed pasteurized goat milk or store-bought whole cow milk.
     
  11. fmg

    fmg New Member

    3,236
    0
    0
    If I have more than 1 freshen same day/couple days, I just milk ea mom into the bottles directly, or if just 1, I will bring a separate bucket...so there won't be any cross-contamination.
     
  12. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

    2,730
    0
    0
    I do the same as Nancy. Mom's colostrum and milk for the first few days and then they get pasteurized milk.
     
  13. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

    16,497
    0
    0
    How would your own CAE prevention kid sero convert? Ever actually have a doe sero convert? In your own herd, not stories?

    Simply only use the milk from those does who you did raise yourself, have been tested negative for years, and/or come from herds who whole herd test for years.

    Why are you all giving money to folks who don't test still? Buying their goats when they won't even put their CAE test results on their website? Why are their tests not on the website? Because they don't test.



    At some point you have to either believe the tests are real, understand the disease process, or spend time heat treating and pasteurising and having new folks do it also, even when they purchase clean stock. You are either negative or not....certainly your homegrown milkers are negative?

    Betty, why spend good money for good milkers from a long tested negative herd, with paperwork in hand with test results on a website for the world to see, and then take them home and heat treat and pasteurize the milk, when they wouldn't be pasteurizing the milk at their home farm? Vicki
     
  14. fmg

    fmg New Member

    3,236
    0
    0
    There are more diseases that are prevented through CAE prevention than just CAE. At convention, there was a talk on Mycoplasma, and they were saying that it is a re-emerging disease as people drop their CAE prevention routines after having clean herds. Mycoplasma prevention was the original CAE prevention...they found out that by doing the heat treating/pasteurizing, that it was preventing those kids from getting CAE as well.

    There are also theories in cattle about heifer calves who consume milk from cows with mastitis being more susceptible to getting it themselves when they freshen. May or may not apply to goats.

    I say this as something to keep in the back of your mind when ditching CAE prevention.
     
  15. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

    16,497
    0
    0
    Maybe Tim will chime in but I started in goats right as CAE testing and prevention started...there was zero talk about pasteurizing before CAE.
     
  16. Greylady

    Greylady New Member

    760
    0
    0
    With a long tested negative herds that makes sense Vicki. We have had some hard lessons t learn when new, (this is true for a lot of us new ones)what to ask for, how to do things correctly, wanting to make sure that we do it right. I know there are as many ways to do things as there are herds which is why it is good to have a mentor! This is our first multiple kidding year and it all so new and sometimes overwhelming!