Tubeing a baby goat.................

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by NubianSoaps.com, Mar 1, 2012.

  1. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Lets start a thread here with utube.com video's of tubing lambs and goats. Photos we can find etc...to sticky on this page during kidding season and to keep in goatkeeping 101. Vicki
     

  2. MayLOC

    MayLOC New Member

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  3. Laverne

    Laverne New Member

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    I like the middle video that Cindy posted, although it didn't highlight to link right to it. The first video she linked to shows the vet putting the tube in on the left side of the mouth, this will point the tube to go down the right side of the throat, so I like that. I don't know if there is really something to that but a vet does it so I will. In the middle video, she marks the length of tube needed with a marker pen, good for newbies I suppose, and crimps the tube when withdrawing so no milk will spill out on the way out, the vet in the first video didn't do that. Maybe it's not that necessary but if I ever have to tube a goat I will do that just to play it safe.
     
  4. Horsehair Braider

    Horsehair Braider New Member

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    Laverne, the way my vet taught me to do it was just pull the tube out "very briskly" so that no milk dribbles into the lungs on the way out. Also, I was taught to put the tube in with the body of syringe - just the body, NOT the plunger - and to allow the milk to go in according as it goes, not to ever force or push it in. You just hold it up and the milk pours in by gravity, and how the kid's stomach is reacting. However taking the syringe off when the milk is in, and plugging the end of the tube, seems like a good idea too. I've been doing it the way I do it for so long, I'll probably not remember to try that next time, and will "briskly" remove it the way I normally do!
     
  5. MayLOC

    MayLOC New Member

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    I think this is an important learned skill we all should learn to do, that gets easier with experience. But, as with most things you do... just realize there is a risk also. I think it is definitely an important asset, but I wouldn't say it is hard to get the tube down into the lungs either. I have seen it happen and it looked the same as it always does and yet the consequence was deadly.
    I have grown up around cattle ranchers, and sheep and goat folks. Experienced folks that grew up in the life and have tubed many different animals, young and old. I bet every one of them has killed a kid/lamb/calf by tubing. And as the vets will say... it happens to everybody. I have seen my husband carefully tube Lots of calves and I have seen him kill a calf also, same for my BIL, my FIL, my step-dad and many neighbors, and these weren't first time tubers either. And these animals are our life, so you can bet they are being as careful as they can be... sometimes you just get it wrong.
    I think we all need to realize the consequences if we do and if we don't. Sure you may possibly kill that kid by tubing, but if it really needs tubing it isn't going to live if you don't either. So you just may save it's life also!
     
  6. KinderCreeks

    KinderCreeks New Member

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    That middle youtube video on tube feeding was wonderful! Thanks so much for posting this! I haven't had to do this as of yet, and hopefully never do, but if so, that video was very helpful :)
     
  7. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Thanks Susan, we love getting feed back, so important threads like this, after kidding season can be stored in goatkeeping 101 for easy reference. Vicki
     
  8. Anita Martin

    Anita Martin Senior Member

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  9. janner

    janner New Member

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    I so, so, so much appreciated the postings of these videos!! I have never even had any baby goats yet, but my first ones are due in 3 weeks. These videos made me feel much more confident about not getting the milk in the lungs. The vids were all different, but listening to the tube to make sure you don't hear breathing and do hear stomach noises, putting the end of the tube in water and making sure it doesn't blow bubbles, measuring the tube to the last rib, paying attention that the baby is not coughing spasmodically and not forcing the tube all seem like good advice. If I still drown a kid, I will definitely KNOW I tried to be as careful as I possibly could. I just hope I can stay calm and remember all this :shocked Hopefully I never have to try it!
    Thanks again,
    janice
     
  10. donadavis

    donadavis New Member

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    Tubing and staying out of the lungs

    I read instructions for tubing that included how to tell if you are in the lungs and not the stomach. Before you tube the kid, measure the distance from the mouth to about an inch beyond the last rib. Measure with the tube and mark the distance with your thumb as you insert the tube gently you know if it stops before the mark your in the lungs and you need to pull out and try again.

    I haven't had to tube a baby yet so even though I have the equipment the vague instruction to listen to see if it sounded hollow was a very scary idea. What does that sound like? I like this method much better and feel much more confident about it.

    I hope I never have to find out if this works!

    Dona Davis
    Spring Mtn Farm
    Purebred Nubian Goats in Vermont
     
  11. blackwell_goats

    blackwell_goats New Member

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    Tubing in Texas

    I have done this before and you have to be so careful. The measuring past the last rib is important. I also keep my hand on the throat and make sure I can feel the tube going down the left side into the stomach. I do a count of 10 after the milk leaves the end of the syringe to make sure it empties. Also pull the tube out quickly to prevent milk ending up in the lungs.