Treating injured teat

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by Kristikat, Apr 17, 2020.

  1. Kristikat

    Kristikat New Member

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    I have a doe who has both mastitis & an injured teat end. To milk her I must remove a scab at the teat orifice. My vet was not help in finding a way to treat this, so I searched on line & found 2 possible products--1) Dr. Naylor Teat Dilators & 2) Dr. Larson's Teat Tubes. Does anyone have any experience with either of these products?
     
    CaramelKitty likes this.
  2. CaramelKitty

    CaramelKitty Member

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    Hi! Unfortunately this website has very few members if any at all that can help you. I would recommend moving to a forum called The Goat Spot. There are a lot of people who can help you there.
    https://www.thegoatspot.net/
    I hope you get it solved! :)
     

  3. skeeter

    skeeter Member

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    I'm not sure what Boer breeders are going to do to help you but no both those products allow even more bacteria into the orifices.

    Carmel kitty needs to quit directing people back to the website they couldn't stand because of the Boer breeders whose advice ruin your milk does.

    Now, has a milk test been done at a lab? Did a sensitivity test get done? What antibiotics are you treating with? What makes you think she has mastitis and not congested udder, CAE, or injury?
     
  4. rachelwilson

    rachelwilson New Member

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    Can you post a pic of the injury? Is the suspected mastitus a result of the injury? After you clean away the scab do you get a lot of milk?
     
  5. beehivekaren

    beehivekaren New Member

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    We also treated an injured udder on a first year fresher Alpine doe. We washed the wound 3 X a day and applied 3% iodine spray and an application of Vaseline. Wound cleared up nicely however now have noticed the doe appears to be nursing on its own teat. Any suggestions of how to solve this problem?
     
  6. Angelia Gregg

    Angelia Gregg New Member

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    Milk more often and tape the teat, or if she isn't feeding kids put something nasty tasting on the teat.
     
  7. Angelia Gregg

    Angelia Gregg New Member

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    How do we delete YOU from posting on this website?
     
  8. beehivekaren

    beehivekaren New Member

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    Thanks for the tips.We'll give them a try.
     
  9. GinnyT

    GinnyT New Member

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    How is your doe? I just got a notification in my email about this post today. I'm not usually on this site. I had a doe with a lacerated teat and udder, but not mastitis. My vet was able to apply stitches, but then she had me use teat tubes of antibiotic. There was no injury at the orifice however. I did have to keep it clean and sprayed with Vetericyn 3xs/day. She was able to completely heal and go on to milk the next season.
     
  10. beehivekaren

    beehivekaren New Member

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    She is doing fine. We have her wearing a "udderbra" to keep her from nursing herself so we have been seeing a full udder. We are weaning the kid off and have stared milking today. Things are going well and her udder wound has cleared up nicely.
     
    GinnyT likes this.
  11. Kristikat

    Kristikat New Member

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    Apparently I was not real clear in my post. Yes, the doe has had been dealing with a severe case of mastitis, but that was not the issue. The issue is an injury to the teat orifice that scabs over. With the scab in place she cannot be milked. However, the sore part will need to scab over in order to heal. The problem is how to permit the sore to heal without closing off the teat opening.
    I had vet come out to help with this issue. He just picked the scab off & inserted a cannuale into the teat & permitted the milk to flow out onto the ground. He then gave me more cannuales & told me to do this at each milking. While it did permit milking the doe, it made the sore get bigger at each milking, so I determined this was NOT a viable solution.
    My research then led me to Dr Naylor's Teat Dilators, which are a medicated cannuale with a closed end to stop access to opening of teat from bacteria, etc. They are inserted after doe is milked to permit healing without permanently closing off teat orifice. Then they are removed when it is time to milk the doe. After milking a fresh one is inserted.
    My research also led me to Dr Larson's Teat Tubes, which are in essence a cannuale that will permit removal of milk at milking time, but it has an end that closes after milking to keep bacteria out of udder. These are left in place throughout the healing process.
    I was looking for feedback from anyone who has used either of these products, or who knows of another way to treat this problem. Clearly I do not want to allow the teat end to heal in such a way that the doe can never be milked again.