Tomorrow Withdrawal Time

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by mirrorjranch, Jan 28, 2008.

  1. mirrorjranch

    mirrorjranch New Member

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    Hi All,

    My wife and I are new to the forum. I had a question about milk withdrawal time when using Tomorrow in a doe with mastitis.

    Last week, one of our Nubian does kidded and when we went to milk her the first time, we noticed that her udder was very "lumpy" or "chunky". In addition, she was running a slight fever and while she was still eating relatively well, she was not acting like herself. Admittedly, we did not send off a sample to test for mastitis, but the signs were there. So, we treated her for two days (twice daily on each side after milking) with Tomorrow; treatment was completed on Sunday. She has no more warmth to the udder, she is eating well, no fever, the lumpiness in the udder is gone, and she is back to being her same loveable and stubborn self. In fact, she is putting out more milk now than she has in the last two years.

    Our question is this: we know that the withdrawal time for Tomorrow in cows is 30 days. Can anyone give us an idea of how long it would be in goats. She is putting out so much milk now, we hate to see it all go to waste. Any guidance anyone could give us would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Tim Pruitt

    Tim Pruitt New Member

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    I would think it would be the same for goats as it would be cows.
     

  3. KJFarm

    KJFarm Senior Member

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    The Tomorrow infusions are for dry treating, so that's why the 30 day withdrawal. For lactating does, you would use the Today infusions which have a 96 hour withdrawal.
     
  4. mirrorjranch

    mirrorjranch New Member

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    I understand the difference between the Today and Tomorrow infusions. However, I also understand that the Tomorrow will not cause a doe to dry up and that goats have a shorter clearance time for antibiotics than other animals do (e.g. - cows). My question is how much shorter?
     
  5. KJFarm

    KJFarm Senior Member

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    Intramammary infusions do not cause an animal to dry up. They are called dry cow treatments because they are long acting in the mammary when you milk the animal out for the last time. The lactating cow treatment is for animals in milk, and they have the shorter withdrawal. Even though goats have a much faster metabolism that cows, I still adhere to the cow withdrawal time.
     
  6. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Yes and I use tomarrow rather than today even when in lactation such as you did but adhear to the withdrawl time as I am allergic to pen and don't want to take any chances at all