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Hey speaking of North Dakota. I heard you guys are famous for having the tallest structure in the U.S. A radio/television tower that stands over 2000 feet high. :D It was some game question on the radio I heard yesterday.
 

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I never thought I would say it, but I miss milking in the freezing cold and sitting in a stall bundled up and waiting for does to kid.

Barn chores take less than 10 minutes twice daily now (and that INCLUDES cleaning stalls). I have to think of extra things to do in order to stay out there longer (I can say this......my barn aisle is squeeky clean).

I still haven't had the urge to spend any time in the milk room though to get that cleaned up and re-organized. I know all my wormers and such are all expired (and ruined because I refused to spend the time clearing that stuff out). Heck, the calendar is still on the wall from when the girls left over a year ago with breeding dates and due dates on the dry-erase board. I can only imagine the things growing in the refrigerator (but I still won't look). I walked in there the other day to grab a flashlight, but I didn't even bother turning the light on......too depressing to see it.
 

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UnRuli Acres said:
I never thought I would say it, but I miss milking in the freezing cold and sitting in a stall bundled up and waiting for does to kid.

Barn chores take less than 10 minutes twice daily now (and that INCLUDES cleaning stalls). I have to think of extra things to do in order to stay out there longer (I can say this......my barn aisle is squeeky clean).

I still haven't had the urge to spend any time in the milk room though to get that cleaned up and re-organized. I know all my wormers and such are all expired (and ruined because I refused to spend the time clearing that stuff out). Heck, the calendar is still on the wall from when the girls left over a year ago with breeding dates and due dates on the dry-erase board. I can only imagine the things growing in the refrigerator (but I still won't look). I walked in there the other day to grab a flashlight, but I didn't even bother turning the light on......too depressing to see it.
:( Maybe one day again....
 

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I'm not sure we qualify as a cold climate, but we do get cold. Usually we will have two weeks of single digit temps in winter and most of the time it will get below freezing and stay there for some time. The coldest it has been since I moved here is -2. To me, anything under 20 is frigid.

We have an insulated milk room with a fridge and running water, so all milk is processed right away. We don't have hot water, but I heat it up on the hot plate that is used for pastuerizing during kid feeding times.

Recently, I found some sheet insulation that is R5 for $5 per 4x8 sheet. It is really helpful. I think the proper term is
foil backed sheet insulation. It may be the ticket for those who have a milk room and just would like a little more help in keeping warm or cool.

We've dropped to milking three over the winter. Everyone else is bred and dried off, and this is a snap. Like others, we have children with cow milk allergies and other allergies that are helped by goat milk, so going without milking isn't an option for us. One of the allergic kids is also terribly freaked over frozen milk and won't drink it. Pain in the butt.

My husband is the one who insisted on insulating the milk room like crazy, and I am glad he did. I really need to appreciate him more.:)
 

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It's seemed pretty cold the past couple of mornings. The coat I was wearing wasn't quite as warm as the one I wore last winter (but had to throw out because it was falling apart). Today, at work, I came across an almost new Carhartt jacket with a quilted lining. I bought it at a great bargain price. Tonite, as I was doing chores, I was toasty warm. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Well, I see some clothing items need to me on my dc's Christmas lists. LOL

We have shorted milking time to only 15 minutes by having more working together. One person is hauling milk in & dropping it off while someone inside weighs & strains and two outside are doing the actual milking.

It was single digits last night and this a.m. and I feel sooooo bad for my girls (the goat ones LOL). As much as I love having animals I worry about them when it gets so cold.
 

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Cotton Eyed Does said:
This year I'm starting early, in February and that tends to be a realy cold time here. Brrr... what was I thinking.
Me too Christine! I don't know what I was thinking either. I have 23 bred for spring. I WAS thinking I'd be moved & have a barn.....but have now taken my house off the market. My oldest daughter is moving nearer to me so I don't want to move farther from her. I think I will put up a carport with a concrete floor & put in plumbing with a hot water heater so I can at least use my milking machine without having to haul everything to the house for cleaning. Milking 23 by hand before work would be a challenge.....actually 23 by machine will be a challenge too :).

Those of you with freezing temps- I don't know how you do it! It was 33 this morning & I was frozen. My son wore 2 jackets to go out & feed- I should take a picture next time :)
 

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of course our single digits may feel warm compared to your 33 degrees if your humidity is high. I know many of you are much much more humid than we are; we are actually a pretty dry climate. And of course if you are used to humid hot hot air 3/4 of the year, 50 would probably feel pretty darn cold :lol
 

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We handle the cold ok, but when it is 25 to 35 below and add a 25 mph wind, it gets cold. 4 years ago when DD2 was a senior in high school, with the wind chill, it was 70 below and that year we had so much snow, my brother had to hire a road grader to clear snow down to the barn and we couldn't see it while it worked. The snow was heavy and wet. We don't have anything heated yet, am hoping to have something soon. We have done this for so many years, it is just part of life. ND has many many good things going for itself, even the cold, however, we have been very lucky, almost everything has gone around us in the western part of ND for the past few year. We have had it really easy. I did invest in the heated water buckets. Although one year, I did make matching goat coats and ear muffs to match for the goats. Only had to use them a couple of times. I think the goats acclimate themselves if they are well fed and have shelter and good bedding. Carolyn
 

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The goaties are getting used to the colder weather, but neither of my old trucks wanted to start this afternoon. I had to go get some grass hay for the bucks. I got my 77 Chevy started with a jump and then it ran just fine. Guess I'll have to start it every once in a while to keep the battery charged.
 

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I guess I didn't answer the original question. We set everything up so it is "at hand" so to speak. After my divorce, we put a water hydrant in back by the goat buildings and next summer may put in another. We were hauling water in 5 gallon buckets on sleds and that was the pits in the winter. There is nothing worse than pitching hay against the wind or trying to haul it in the wind ( my ex was really good at that). Our wind usually comes from the N and NW so we have the bales set to the N and NW of the buildings and covered, this adds protection against the wind. Also once a week, we make sure that everything is filled and moved around to make things easier. Watch the weather, so if anything is coming up, you are ready. I have a rope that is tied to the house and can be tied to the goat barn so that we can get out to the barn, we have had to use it twice in 12 yrs. We brush the udders off and only wash the teats before milking and then only dip the very bottom of the teats in the teat dip, then take a quick dry with a clean paper towel. I don't know if this is the correct way to do things, but I sure don't want them to have wet teats when things freeze immediately when wet. I don't know if there is a quick way to do things when weather is working against us. If you prepare for the worst possible winter in the fall. then you are ready for anything. Also we have several tobaggon style sleds that help alot. Carolyn
 
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