terrible hind feet, but nice front feet?

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by pokyone42, Apr 13, 2008.

  1. pokyone42

    pokyone42 New Member

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    I am just curious here... I did a search, but did not find this particular thing...sorry if it has been posted about before. (I know this is a dairy goat forum, but am hoping for any ideas you smart dairy folks might have. ) We have a yearling Boer cross doe.. She is beautiful, (in my unbiased opinion, anyways. ;) Can ya tell she is a favorite? lol.)
    She is about 33% Alpine. She was born here. We owned both Mom and Dad. This gal looks very Boer-ish, tho has a straighter nose. She grew wonderfully, but sadly, aborted in Feb. She is up to date on all vaccines, wormings, etc.. Dad's feet were not bad like this, and Mom's feet aren't either..Neither of them have/had GREAT feet, so could it just be a combo of the two, and it was a bad one? This girl is NOT a piggy eater, either.. so I do not think she has been overfed... she DOES have a slightly older half-sister who is a pig with feed, but who has perfect feet! -This is confusing, but twin does bred to the same buck... both had doe kids.. one with GREAT feet, one with great FRONT feet, and horrid hind feet! (I just gave you some background in case it means anything...)
    Anyway, she has absolutely horrible back feet, and I do not know why. I trim the whole herd's feet regularly, and hers grow very strangely. Hard to describe, but they curve and bend outward, sort of. Almost like her weight is kept on the inside toe.. Does that make any sense? I am wondering if it is a bone structure thing... I dunno.
    She also has very skinny back feet. Each toe is very thin.. like a 1/2 inch at the thickest area.. the heel. Her front feet look great, and perfectly normal, and normal sized as well! (This is very hard to describe... sorry.) She IS a large girl... She was our youngest doe kid last year,-born in late March, and has dwarfed her half-sisters, and is 150 pounds, at 13 months..If you do not look at her back feet, she is a BEAUT! (at least to ME! lol) Any ideas on why the back feet would be so weird, but the front feet are fine? she has no trouble at all walking... it is just a challenge to trim her feet, and I wonder why they are like this..Any ideas would be appreciated. We trim hooves about every 6 weeks, or whenever they need it....Thanks in advance..
     
  2. Pairaka

    Pairaka Guest

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    Interesting, I've been wanting to ask about the same thing. I have some that are just as you describe. Thin, curved hind feet and are constantly needing to be trimmed and yet can't be trimmed all that much because there isn't that much to trim. I'd be interested to learn what causes this; whether it's a genetic thing or environmental.

    And I have the same problem with a couple of my goats: One two overgrowing the others. I have one that I am working on now on an almost daily basis because I want to get her feet in better condition and I just can't trim enough at one time nor will she let me work on all her feet at once (so, one foot a day, basically, just trim a little off one, then do the next one the next day) to try to correct the problem. It seems to be working and she seems to be walking well, but it might be that I'll have to trim her feet weekly to keep them in this condition as they grow like crazy.

    As for the cause, I suspect either severe neglect (before I bought her) or founder. My vet says she walks like she foundered at some time in the past and with the way her toes grow unevenly, I wouldn't be surprised.

    Foot health is something that I really need to work on and I'm working on making it a higher priority. I promise.
     

  3. Shykid Acres

    Shykid Acres Guest

    The only thing I can think of is genetics but I really don't know. Hopefully you will get an answer from someone a lot more experienced than I. Perhaps they can tell you. I also got to wondering if she is not absorbing the nutrients just right for good hoof growth but then I remembered you saying that her front feet are fine so I am back to thinking that it is probably genetics. ???
     
  4. Rose

    Rose New Member

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    Right now, I'm keeping a hoof rasp next to the milk stand and working on each doe about once a week. I can file off a bit every few days and make much better progress than once a month trimming.
     
  5. pokyone42

    pokyone42 New Member

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    I do have a tendency to look for faults.. I am always telling my husband.. "Well, if THIS one had the feet like THAT one, AND the udder of this one over here, and the neck of THAT other one over there.....and the perfect ears like Susie over there, etc..(even tho I have not shown goats in like 20 years...I guess it still comes out now and then...) we would THEN have the perfect goat! Well, except that we would need the personality of that little sweetie that is crawling into my lap right now;)!
    I AM very curious about this foot problem tho, as it does NOT seem to be a problem from mom or dad.. (as we have grandmas, and lots of half-sisters and kids from the half-sisters...and all are fine so far.. just makes me wonder.....thanks!
     
  6. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    You would be pretty hard pressed to find a poorer dairy breed to breed to a meat goat that already has poor feet. You add the amounts of grain most feed to boers and you see even worse feet than normal in most boers, figure they are supposed to range, breed, kid out twins and nurse them to weaning with not a bite of grain, and certainly not improved pastures. Alpines faults are their feet...and foreudders. So I would say your problems are genetic, and as Kaye always reminds us, although these two are sisters they do not have anywhere near the same genes, so one is a keeper and one is a cull. Vicki
     
  7. Tracy in Idaho

    Tracy in Idaho Member

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    Yep. This is something you have to cull for. I am shipping a FF with a *gorgeous* udder to the dairy in a few weeks just because I don't like the way her rear pasterns and feet are looking -- and they aren't that bad. And I decided I don't like her ear set. :lol Her full sister is a bit smaller, but more correct on her feet. At this point, I am simply looking for reasons to cull. Earlier in my herd, she may have stayed around longer. But if a FF has iffy feet, they are only going to get worse with age and weight.

    I rarely have foreudder problems anymore :p That's part of my culling problems this year -- out of 6 FFs, I have ONE bad udder....and it looks pretty darn good from behind, lol.

    Tracy
     
  8. MBKTown

    MBKTown Guest

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    I have the same problem. I'm sure it's genetic, as i've had my girl since she was a baby. I want to constantly work on those back feet but there really isn't hardly anything to cut. I've made her bleed twice. I might try a file.

    MB
     
  9. pokyone42

    pokyone42 New Member

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  10. MBKTown

    MBKTown Guest

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    If I can remember i'll get some pics of Maybelle's feet. I'm new to the goat thing and don't have lots of experience trimming. I do alright on the others' normal feet but on hers I really don't know what to do. I'd like some input.
     
  11. Shykid Acres

    Shykid Acres Guest

    A little bit at a time. If it gets pink looking. Stop. That is my advice. But I suppose you already knew that. :)

    -Kim