Spongy pasterns

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by goatkid, Apr 16, 2008.

  1. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    Both me and a friend have noticed that a few of our does have paasterns that seem a bit spongy when they walk. Neither of us give BoSe routinely, but we do free feed goat mineral. We are on different well water, but use the same mineral. We are also talking different breeds of goats, so it's not just something genetic. Both our herds are fed alfalfa. Do you folks think regular BoSe would help?
     
  2. susie

    susie New Member

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    What is spongey pasterns? Too much "give" when they walk?
    Susie
     

  3. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    If it's not inherited..then I'd say it's a selenium issue. I have a doe that goes down in her pasterns when stressed. I've learned to give her a shot of Bo-Se when I put her on the trailer to show. By the time we get to the show ring, her pasterns are acceptable. Have a full sister and 2-1/2 sisters that are strong on their pasterns.??
    Kaye
     
  4. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    If selenium isn't an issue like Kaye said, and you see pretty dramatic effects when it's used...than it's either genetic or....... it can be from not keeping up with hoof trimming (especially as young fast growing kids and yearlings), letting them get fat and jumping up and down on milkstands when heavy....and biggy is fighting.

    Nutritionally when kids are weaned off calcium and protein rich milk, onto grass hays. If you walk into the barn and can't answer the question "Where is the readably absorbable source of calcium 24/7/365" than they will structurally (conformation) suffer. Vicki
     
  5. LMonty

    LMonty New Member

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    well, theres one easy way to find out-give them some Bo-Se and see what happens :) Or give half of them the shot, and then see if theres a noticable difference.

    That way you conduct your own experiment-if you havent seen any change within a week (on the outside), you could probably assume its not selenium related. If the injected does do improve, then you pretty much prove selenium levels are involved.

    Quick and dirty test thats cheap, easy to do and doesnt take long to get a result. Gotta love that!
     
  6. wheytogosaanens

    wheytogosaanens New Member

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    I'm just trying to think this through... If Boer kids (that are nursing their dams) are weaned and put on pasture/browse they don't seem to suffer from structural problems. It seems that they should. Or are dairy kids different somehow?
    What about cows? They usually go on grass pasture after weaning and don't seem to have any ill-effects. Or do all of these ranchers feed alfalfa? Or do they get enough calcium in their mineral (Some cattle minerals are 10% calcium, 5 % phosphorus or 12:12)?

    I guess this diverges from the thread, so I apologize, but still wonder what you all think about the above musings. Camille
     
  7. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    Boer goats have different nutritional needs than dairy goats. They were developed to live in the arid terrain of South Africa, where their feed is mostly browse. We have bred our dairy goats to push milk production. If you try and feed Boers like dairy goats, they get fat. I sold my Boers because I don't have the space to run two herds amd the Boers were getting obese on the Nubians' diet of alfalfa and grain. Kathie
     
  8. wheytogosaanens

    wheytogosaanens New Member

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    I agree that the Boers get fat on alfalfa and grain once they are grown. (We have both Dairy and Boer and both do pretty well for us).But shouldn't kids develop approx. the same way?

    OK, what about cattle and Dairy calves? They go out on grass and don't have any problems. BTW, we occassionally have a Boer get a little spongy after kidding and the Bo-Se works wonders. Dr. Parrish at WSU says that sometimes different animals just assimilate differently and stress affects them differently as well. I guess I would like it all to be logical but also want to avoid sweeping generalizations. Camille
     
  9. Tim Pruitt

    Tim Pruitt New Member

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    Does that are heavy bred or who have just kidded will also have a problem with this as their ligaments get loose just kidding and for a little while afterwards.