Some LGD questions

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by kidsngarden, Apr 28, 2008.

  1. kidsngarden

    kidsngarden New Member

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    We are seriously considering 2-3 LGD's for our little herd (anticipating a larger one some day!) I've read you should have more than one...

    What I am wondering about is thier coats. Those GP's are so very white and long and fluffly and we are so very muddy adn wet here. Is there a short hair breed LGD? Right now I have a high maintenance dog (australian shepherd/standard poodle with FUR that has to be cut all the time) and I just don't think I can do more!

    And also what is the training? Do you just leave them in as puppies and they are instinctively protective or do you need to work with them?

    Lastly (but not really I'm sure I will have more questions!) Can you use these dogs as "pets" My son wants to know if this dog will fetch and things. I said no because he would always be working, but I wanted to be sure...
    Thanks,
    Bethany
     
  2. Bethany,

    The only good dog we had here was years ago and was a Antolan sheperd. Was great...never left the pasture. We NEVER touched that dog unless it was to worm or something like that. He thought he was a sheep. I see people with guard dogs all up around the house and that...what good are they? If they are laying on the porch and your goats/sheep are out to pasture?

    I have been to WAY to many places that have dogs and are to interested in the yard than the barnyard. My opinion is...if you have to fence them in...why bother you are fencing out the other dogs.

    Ken in MO
     

  3. Sunny Daze

    Sunny Daze New Member

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    I have an anatolian as well. There are smooth coat and rough coat anatolians, smooth coat being more common. We are in Florida and all the Pyrs I have seen around here are matted, filthy, and miserable due to our humidity and weather. If you truly want your LGD to guard, then you want to have minimal human contact. You want to be able to handle it when needed and I think they should know basic commands, but thats about it. I ended up cheating and bringing ours in the yard. She was going through her puppy "chase" stage and I didn't really have a good pen to put her in when I wasn't around to supervise so in the yard she went. She is a little over a year now, and I am hoping to start getting her out with the goats more. Fortunatley where we are now we don't have a huge predator problem, so just a dog barking from the fence is usually enough. She usually sleeps right next to the baby goat pen, and I let her in when I go in and she will lick them. I have heard the key is to always have the puppies in with a group of goats that can dominate them slightly so they are always put in their place if they get to rough with the goats. I am no expert though, this is our first one and like I said...she is part yard dog now! I don't think many LGD breeds are very inclined to play fetch even if you do raise them with the family...
     
  4. Theresa

    Theresa New Member

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    I have 2 anatolian/GP mix. They are great dogs. I did not want the long hair of the GP because of it getting matted. Mine have fur like the anatolian, so it is short.
    When you get them you have to put them with whatever you want them to guard and they have to stay there. If not then they will never learn that the goats are what they are suppose to protect. For us that ment we had to build a puppy pen inside the goat pen. Our first one stayed in the pen until she could not get out of the goat pen. Then she was allowed out. Also, you want to put the puppy with goats that will not tolerate puppy play. No chasing, no biting, no rough house with the goats. The older goats will butt the puppy and teach it that this is not tolerated. You just have to give the puppy a place to go to get away from the goats if they are being rough, like an escape area. Ours could get under the goat feeder for protection.

    Next, we did play with the puppy but only in the goat yard. Ours will come, I can do whatever I need to with them, clip nails, give meds and shots, what ever. Mine are probable a little to people friendly, but with kids I did not want to have to worry about someone getting bite by one of the dogs. So as a puppy, I messed with the all the time, pulling ear and tail, messing in their mouths, with their feet, this also helps later when you have to mess with them. I also taught mine that it was not acceptible to be aggressive with their food. Now, they will not play fetch or tug, but they will follow my children around if they are out in the goat pen.

    I hope this helps. We do have 2 LGDs but I did not get them both at the same time. We started with 1 and then added the other later. I am not sure how it would be with 2 puppies at the same time.
    Theresa
     
  5. kidsngarden

    kidsngarden New Member

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    I was wondering if anatolians had short or long fur. I just know a GP would look just awful here!

    Maybe we will start with just one pup in the goat pen in a puppy pen like the Theresa said. We don't have many goats so have 2 or more would be a lot of food to gaurd so few goats!

    I think I would like them to tolerate me messing with them so they would need human contact, just like if I want my goats to be human friendly I have to be around them a lot and touching them all the time. grabbing hooves and checking mouths just for practice. Seems like that would be a good thing to do with the dogs too.

    Theresa, how did your first dog take to the second? Did you get the second as a pup and acclimate it the same way you did the first?
     
  6. Theresa

    Theresa New Member

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    Yes, I got the second one as a pup. He is only 6 months old now and almost as big as my 2 year old female. She weights at least 150lbs so he is going to be huge! She did not mind him at all. He even tried to nurse her when we first brought him home. The only thing that she does not tolerate is for him to eat her food, but otherwise, she does fine with him. I have been told that you can not have to of the same sex dogs together unless one is nuetered or spayed. But I have seen many that have 2 females or males together as long as they are fixed. And we do plan to nueter the male soon. We are thinking about having 1 litter and then getting him nuetered. By the way, mine were about 8-10weeks old when we got them.
    Theresa
     
  7. KJFarm

    KJFarm Senior Member

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    Yes, the Anatolians are short haired as are the Akbash and Kangal. We have 2 Anatolians and 1 Kangal guarding our livestock.
     
  8. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    My GP/anatolian mix is in my opinion a better guard than the full GP but both of mine are long hair the GP stays with the goats more and the mix does the pacing around the parimeter of the fence.
     
  9. J-Basqo

    J-Basqo New Member

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    It was mentioned that if you have a fence why get a dog?? If you have a "need" for a dog, a fence isnt gonna be enough. Unless you have a 12foot, small mesh deer fencing, buried underground a foot or two, something could get in but your goats CANT get out. A big LGD cannot get out of 5ft tall 4x4 square field fence, but the 35lb heeler down the road can, also a bobcat/cougar or racoon will sail over (through or under) as well.
    Also, my fencing is 5 feet tall and with my 4 1/2 feet of snow this winter there was about 3 months that the barn can could even step over the fence.
    So if you live in an area where there is zero predator problem and you would be fine with just a fence or just a dog for the "just in case", but IMO a fence is not enough in alot of instances.
    Patina
     
  10. Tracy in Idaho

    Tracy in Idaho Member

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    Bethany, we have had/bred Anatolians for geesh -- 16 years or more now. Hands down some of the best dogs we've ever had -- the last one is 14 now, and we're going to have to find another dog soon. She is the only one we've ever had hasn't roamed in the least -- she'll be hard to beat.

    Anatolians have the shorter hair, but all of them have a double coat that they'll blow twice a year. It's not that big a deal, and it's kinda entertaining to sit and pluck it :)

    A good LGD is mostly instinctive. Yes, you have to correct them when they are young, but once they are through their "teen" years, they are good. You want a pup that has been born out in the barn from working parents.

    They don't do fetch :) But neither do I agree that they need to be left in the pasture and not socialized at all. My stud dog won his championship in the show ring and was good as gold out in public. At home, he worked. He knew the difference. You should be able to load them in a car and take them to the vet. They need to know how to go on a leash and be out in public if necessary. It doesn't take away from their working ability in the least.

    Tracy
     
  11. kidsngarden

    kidsngarden New Member

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    Yes Tracy, it would seem that just like a seeing eye dog who knows when the harness is on it's time to work, I would think an LGD would need to know when he's behind the fence it's time to work. And definetely, I would want it socialized as I just don't understand how you can do vet visits, etc. without it.

    I've contacted the only anatolian breeder I could find in WA, just 1.5 hours from me. He is going to try to breed his dog again, but she did not take last time so who knows?