Somatic Cell Count Increases & Milking Frequency

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Aja-Sammati, Feb 20, 2008.

  1. Aja-Sammati

    Aja-Sammati Active Member

    1,004
    0
    36
    Interesting study! I guess we should milk 2 times a day until we dry them off...

     
  2. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    """"In conclusion, reduced frequency of milking in late lactation leads to the production of milk that is abnormal in character and this may be linked to reduced quality of dairy products manufactured from such milk."""

    I guess my question would be this then if this study holds as true with goats. How much quality is lost ? Are we talking about enough to change the grade(s) of the milk ? and does this change in cell count have a significant impact on the health of the udder through the doe's dry period, or next lactation.?

    Whim
     

  3. That study is an on going thing in the dairy world. Most people will just milk 2 or 3 or even 4 times a day till the day of dry off. The reason for higher SCC is that you have left the milk in the udder. And the really suprising thing with milk...its toxic to the animal. Hence, the higher SCC on the milk.

    The lasting production lose is not that great. In dairy cattle its a couple hundred pounds...but on the average Holstien in the US...that is less than 1%. But, the real factor is...what is low SCC milk worth? The last Co-op that I shipped milk to...anything under 250,000 was an extra $1cwt. 250k to 500k was set rate...500K to 650K less $0.75....650K to 750K was less $1...over 750K dropped to grade B...if there was a market or they would buy you milk for less $3.50.

    Its harder to get a low SCC milk out of an animal that has had a higher SCC in their lifetime. Takes a couple of years if you are lucky. Now, here is where the real tricky part comes in. What is causing the higher SCC? It can be many things...enviroment, infections, change in rotuine ect... But, the few times that I have had to put off milking, there has been a jump in the SCC of the tank.

    That is why they say 12 hours is hte best. But, I have milked at 10-14 and 11-13. Really no difference...but that is what they was use to. I never go to one time a day milking...to me its a waste of time. If you are milking others then its just as easy to put them in the barn and milk them as it is to forget about them.

    It really all depends on how good of milk quality that one wants. That is the deciding factor. I know people that are happy as a lark to not get kicked to grade B milk. But, then there are ones like me....its its over 300K its WAY to high. Prodcing low SCC milk is not that hard, its just something that you have to work at and keep working at it. As a Vet said once...getting a low SCC is easy...keeping it there, that is the hard part. I think there is alot of truth to that, I can go in and in a few months and get that low SCC. But, then when I leave, what is going to happen? That is another reason why big dairy will pay a mint to get mexican women milking in thier barns. A study in CA found that, they on average, would have the lowest SCC milk that was produced.

    Ken
     
  4. Kaye White

    Kaye White New Member

    1,837
    0
    0
    :biggrin Just goes to prove that women make better milkers!! Or...anal guys like you!!

    Kaye
     

  5. Kaye...I not EVEN going to respond to that one :rofl
     
  6. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    Thanks Ken

    Let me ask you one other question, if you have the time ......or anybody else who would know.

    I am not on DHIR here.....(wanted to, but really had a hard time developing a helper circuit).......So, would there be a way (cheap) to take milk samples at random during a doe's lactation cycle, and have them analyzed for SCC ? shoot lets take that further......fats, proteins, and any other thing that effects quality.
    Kinda a quality control program on a very small and limited basis.

    Thanks for your time, Whim
     
  7. Aja-Sammati

    Aja-Sammati Active Member

    1,004
    0
    36
    Also, goats have higher SCC than cows, and it is normal. Something about some cells in goat milk that are not distinguished from actual somatic cells in the normal tests.
     
  8. Whim...

    The only way that I know that you can get some cheap samples done it talk to a food science/dairy science program at a Univ. I know at one time LSU would run samples if it was not that many for about 3 bucks a sample. One other way, that you MIGHT get it done is call Langston and talk to them. I know the Lab here in MO you have to be on DHIA or they will not run under 100 samples. Then its at the cost of $5 a sample. The best way is just to start calling or e-mailing the DHIA labs and talk to them and see. I know when I was at teh lab in WI, we would take on some samples and test run the machines at the first part of the day to flush out the system. They was not all the time right with the number but, they would get you in the ball park. Say...human count is 300...machine might read it as 400. Most of the time it was not that way off of what the standard count was.

    The whole "myth" on goats are higher SCC is a bunch of horse pucky with me. I heard that all the time "OH goats are higher that is a fact of life". But, what I find VERY interesting is that there are dairy goat herds in New England that are running right at 200K or below on over 200 does in milk. The whole thing with goats run high...look at the way most of goats milk is produced. Freshen in the spring...late lacation is the fall. It is very normal for a cow to double her cell count from 60 days fresh to 300 DIM. That is common, its has to deal with the teat end being open that many more times. Look at extended lacation animals...just not goats but cows. It is very common for people that have a hard time breeding back their cows to have a higher SCC. That is cause she is just exposed to more bacteria in the lacation.

    The difference on the cells in goats and cow milk is very simple. The goats cell walls on the white blood cells are thinner. That is all...so more the milk is handled the more cells are going ot bust open. That is where they get the whole goats have a higher SCC. The machines are set to run at reading white cells...now...go with humans reading the samples then they will run about the same as cattle. Since then you are looking at the cells and figuring out busted ones and other cells in the milk. IF you want to look at something fun...and EASY way to look at SCC. Take a drop of milk...put a VERY little food coloring in it. I am talking about a SMALL drop. Let it dry for about 5 minutes...then put it under the mircoscope and you can see some...not all of the Somatic cells. That gives you are reference of the amount of cells in the milk. No way is that a good test...but something fun to do on a rainy day.

    Ken