Silly vet

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Leo, Jun 17, 2008.

  1. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    Wonderful! You have dealt with "other livestock". If you haven't noticed by now... goats are MUCH different than other livestock.

    Sorry, your comments still don't hold water until you have actually bred goats.

    Sara
     
  2. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Think you will find Anna with goat and the way their metabolism works which is much different than other animals feeding/supplementing etc etc etc is a whole new ball game if you want healthy /easy freshing /good milking goats.
     

  3. wheytogosaanens

    wheytogosaanens New Member

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    First of all, goats are NOT like other livestock. If they were, then drugs for cattle should work for goats (they don't) at the same dosages (way off).

    There are many experienced goat breeders on this forum and they have both knowledge and experience. You might want to listen for a while before posting advice. It IS irresponsible for you to pass out this generalized advice, as someone who is just finding their way may heed your advice, only to have all kinds of problems later because of it.

    Folks here are very nice, but they will pull anyone up short who is making erroneous statements. They just care too much.

    Camille
     
  4. In the case of selenium, the government controls just how much is allowed in the feed we can give to our livestock due to the toxicity of too much and the fact there are some areas that do not need any extra and extra would kill livestock. The level is catered to those areas that need little to no extra. In a good portion of the States, this minimal level does not come close to what is needed to keep your livestock healthy. So we look for other ways of supplementing.
    In order to boost the amount of selenium and E in feed enough to combat the deficiencies that can be found in some areas, one needs a vet script, so may as well use the BoSe and be sure of how much the animal is getting.

    We are supposed to give our calves 3 1/2ccs of BoSe at brith due to how deficient our area is. Our kids are to be given 1cc of BoSe. This according to the local vet's office.
    It makes a difference in the health of the livestock as well.
     
  5. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    :rofl I WILL remind you of that statement when you come on here asking for medicines to use in a problem! AND YOU WILL HAVE PROBLEMS. PERIOD.

    That is about as false as it gets! Without the use of medications you do have another option. Bury the goat. This option makes me about as MAD as I can get! When a few days of an antibiotic will save the goats life!
    AND like Roseanne stated the goverment FDA will only allow a min. of selenium in feeds and minerals...so it is needed in MOST parts of the US.
    Kaye
     
  6. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    like Roseanne stated the goverment FDA will only allow a min. of selenium in feeds and minerals...so it is needed in MOST parts of the US.
    .......................

    Also add that through the USDA goat are classified as sheep and goats, so it's off label for us to even get more selenium in minerals by using cattle or horse minerals. Even then it is in such low numbers that without giving injectable selenium pre kidding, per breeding and to infant stock at birth (and that is minimal doesn't really treat the true defficency year round) you will have constant problems in your herd. There are places in the country that are selenium rich, I know someone on our forum is from such a place...Dakota's I think.

    Copper is another huge problem being linked to sheep...and since most minerals are nothing but copper sulfate, it does a number on rumens. Then the mineral is full of iorn which further scews the amounts of copper and calcium our does utilize.

    You really won't believe when you have goats and do this a for awhile how different diary goats are from any other livestock. We have to teach vets as we go. Even then the 22 year realtionship I have with my vet does not mean she will do the off label stuff for others she does for me. Vicki
     
  7. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    I'm fortunate enough to have a vet who will give me bottles of the meds I need. He's a good vet, but doesn't do house calls, so I have to take some of the goats in. The good thing is that most of my ailing goats have not had to go to the vet. Since I have the meds, when I need to call him, he tells me what to use over the phone. When I need a farm call for things like blood testing a group of goats, there is another vet who will come out to do that. Kathie
     
  8. leslieh

    leslieh New Member

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    I have to agree with the group. Goats are WAY different! I've raised Labs and Quarter Horses for 10 years and grew up on a cow/calf operation. Boy did I have a lot to learn with the goats! All the things you hear about goats turn out to be myths. Goats are the most "high maintenance" animal I have dealt with. We are right at 10 years with the goats and I'm still learning new things every day!

    Leslie
     
  9. Leo

    Leo New Member

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    Ditto to what everyone said, when I first started with goats, I listened to everything my vet said, I lost ALOT of goats, then I found Vicki's and other's sage advise on another forum, listening to the good people here has saved me of alot of problems and helped me streamline the feeding regime thus saving me $$$.
    Goats are unique, and vets just aren't right all the time. Part of the reason I started this thread, some vets have their heart in the right place, but don't understand how different some systems are.
    Megan
     
  10. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Problem is that most VETs only get abt 6 wks training with regards to goats and until recent years goats just weren't the $$ getters. :)
     
  11. Sunny Daze

    Sunny Daze New Member

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    I have found the younger vets are the ones who are usually more open minded and knowledgable about goats. Since most vets don't have much day to day dealing with goats, they go off of what they learned from vet school 10, 20, 30 yrs ago which is quite outdated!
     
  12. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    I copied everything I could from saanendoah.com on drugs and diseases etc and gave a copy to my vet :)