Sick doe- help needed

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by homeacremom, Jul 22, 2008.

  1. homeacremom

    homeacremom New Member

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    This is an Alpine/Togg, been milking 5 months, 140 lbs. Is on free choice alfalfa pellets, new mixed hay for the past 3 weeks, lots of clean water, grain on milkstand, minerals... Noticed yesterday that she was a little listless, but the heat has been intense all week. Scheduled a fecal check on everybody for end of the week...
    Condition now- milk production down by half this morning, but ate all her grain and even some alfalfa pellets,no lumps or indications of mastitis really;!!!!! temp 107* (normal between 101-102 -others in herd normal) standing listlessly, but head and tail up. No stretching, acute pain, or injuries. I flavored some water with Gatorade which she only tasted. Seems a little dehydrated to me. Gave her a BoSE and vit B shot.
    I have banamine, Biomycin, pen G, excenel, and a tad of Baytril(prefer not to use while in milk).
     
  2. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    That high temp I would be giving banamine and probably would start on biomycin myself , thinking pneumonia. Have you listened to her lungs?? give her some salt and see if she won't drink
    However if it is as hot there as it is here it isn't any wonder they won't eat.
     

  3. homeacremom

    homeacremom New Member

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    Thanks for the reply, Sondra. I was listening to her breath too and watching for any difficulty walking. Just anything to go with the high temp. She did eat this morning; just not drinking. Just came in from giving her the banamine and setting up a fan. Called Kaye and she thinks heat stress. Makes sense as there are no other symptoms of infection anywhere and it is killing hot here today. Heat and high humidity. Poor girl! She is a heavy milker too. Gonna let the banamine kick in and then try to coax her to drink once she feels a bit better.
    Oh my, I'm glad for my bitty air conditioner because even though the house is still 80*+ the humidity is relatively low.
     
  4. homeacremom

    homeacremom New Member

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    Update: She's going to be alright. Second day her temp was still 104* although it had stormed, cooled off and gotten breezy. It took another dose of banamine the second day and some normasol (injectable electrolytes) to get her temp down. Lot of watching and coaxing to get her to drink, but getting the electrolytes in her restored fluid balance.
    Those B vits are good stuff too. It's amazing the difference they make. I did wonder if she might get too much since she was dehydrating with nothing left to flush the extras out. ??? Stress must really use up the B's though because her urine wasn't reeking of B once she started going.

    In a case like this would it be safe to wet her down with tepid water? I even thought about a tepid water enema :really, but in her condition was worried that cooling her quickly might put her in to shock.
     
  5. mill-valley

    mill-valley New Member

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    I don't think an enema would do much good, besides being awfully uncomfortable. I have in the past sprayed down a really stressed goat (panting, etc) with water and it seemed to help quite a bit...not sure if there are side effects? Thing is if she really was sick that could make it worse.
     
  6. Sharpgoat

    Sharpgoat New Member

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    I do not like getting a heat stressed goat wet... I just get the neck wet it cools the blood going to the head and core.
    It cools them fast with out the stress of a wet goat.
    Fran
     
  7. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    Same as a heat stressed horse, if they are in need of being relieved, run COOL (not cold~as from a well) water down the inside of the back legs. There are many more veins and arteries closer to the surface there, than anywhere on the body. DO NOT wet the entire goat. This will cause cooling too quickly and cause shock. Plus the evaporation effect actually causes more heat. Don't even think of ice packs. Object is to lower the core temp SLOWLY so as not to send the goat into shock and death.

    Those that are in big time trouble...panting excessively, wobbly, can't or won't get up....IV FLUIDS and steriods are a must. Better get them to a vet,QUICKLY!

    I'm glad she's doing much better, keep an eye on this girl during the rest of the hot part of the summer.
    Kaye