Show Questions

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Little Moon, Apr 19, 2008.

  1. Little Moon

    Little Moon New Member

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    I am not sure if I am posting this in the right place, so feel free to move it. My first question is "How do you train/teach a doe to stand in the*show pose*?" Front feet solid under her shoulders and back legs back and out to each side to show off her udder.

    Second question - "Do you do anything similar to show a buck?"


    Sorry if these seem like silly questions, but I must either have the most uncooperative goats on the planet or I am doing something wrong! I know how to train a dog, but am totally clueless when it comes to goats.

    Thanks,
    Anne
     
  2. mill-valley

    mill-valley New Member

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    Repetition is huge...spend 10-15 min/day for a couple weeks. They will get it. Punishing doesn't help a whole lot, just patience and consistency. Also helps if you do it after feeding them so they aren't grabbing at food the whole time.
     

  3. I dont remember who posted this idea but we have been using it on Lindsey's yearling and is doing much better. Put a tether somewhere and put your goat on it. Keep adjusting the goat and after awhile when you put them on there they will stand for you. Now we can use a lead on Xena and she stands. Using the "stand" command over and over helps too. Another thing we have trained her on is direction (not cart goat commands, she did that on her own) by using her collar. Barely pull to the right she goes right. Pullup she stands. Pull a bit to the left she goes left. Pull up and back she backs up. We spend hours with Lindsey's goats cause of her being in the wheelchair. Tammy
     
  4. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    The wheelchair I can see needing more work than walking.....but, I NEVER teach my goats to show! I take them to a show, they go with me where ever I go. I'm the only familiar thing they know. At home they are not concentrating on what you want...they want to be back with their buddies, eating, or playing.
    I don't do the "California spread"...so there's no need to mess with their hind legs. There's a "button" on the brisket that you can push to move a back leg forward or backwards.

    Too much time spent setting up goats and you have dull looking goats. I like the alert look over ho,hum. The kids are started out at birth being handled behind their heads, moving, leading, ect...without collars and they know when I have pressure the back of their heads they're suppose to do something. It also teaches them not to fight the head stanchion.
    Kaye
     
  5. Shykid Acres

    Shykid Acres Guest

    Kaye - I have heard that there is a spot/button. How do you know where it is? How to find it?
     
  6. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    It's one of those things if a person who shows, shows you once how to punch a goat down, you will know how.

    I am a big messer of kids on the lambar. I go around the lambar even as tiny infants, and spread their legs and punch them down, reaching under and feeling of their udder. I set them up at the lambar at least once a day. It also helps me pick through kids.

    I use a training collar on my does, the one with spikes. If I jerk it hard enough it will draw blood. TEASING!!!! It gets their attention with minimal effort. Unlike Kaye, I prefer the robot goats who show themselves with no effort from me. I am also the worlds nicest person and will put on showmanship clinics for new kids to learn to show...what they dont' know is that as they drag the yearlings and kids around the 'ring' they are teaching them to show for me :) Vicki
     
  7. Shykid Acres

    Shykid Acres Guest

    Vicki- You are smart letting the youngsters train a bit for you. :lol
    I practiced setting my oldest doe up and messing with her udder since she was little. Since she kidded 11 days ago, she has been a GREAT milker, not in quantity yet but in the fact that she stands very nicely for me and only once got her foot in the pail. :) I wanted to show her but did not get around to it. :( Maybe I'll be able to with one or both of my new ones.
     
  8. SandyReuel

    SandyReuel New Member

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    I'm with you Vicki!
    My poor old back won't stand for the rigors of training babies to show so I pay one of my 4-H kids to come and spend an hour leading and setting up the youngsters... Just a couple of times around in a big circle stopping and setting them up a couple of times on each circuit, for each kid. Then she comes back the next day and almost all of them have it down... Remember not to work very long with each kid at first so they don't get antsy and Be firm... If you use show collars on them for this training they soon learn that messing around while in the show "clothes" is a No No and they will come to associate the chain collar with the ring... If you want your kids and does to stand still be sure to maintain firm contact with the collar way up at the junction of the neck and the head...yes, even as you are setting the back legs...You should realize that the more correctly put to gether an animal is the less "showing" she/he will need. If the back is level and the legs properly angulated they will naturally stand in a good show posture as soon as you lift the head with the collar...

    Sandy
     
  9. I am with Kaye...I dont mess with them hardly at all till show time. That way they are more active looking. I have WAY to many worn out animals in the middle of summer that will just stand there, and stare into space.

    ken in MO
     
  10. Katarina

    Katarina New Member

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    I have my younger sister's do "shows" out in the barn. They will spend hours out in the barn walking the goats around in their show collars, while the girls take turns judging the goats. The goats learn to walk, stopping and doing what the girls ask them to do. To the point where Liberty who is five could handle Nyla when she went into the PeeWee class, stopping when Libby wanted her to and going when Libby wanted her to. Saves me time (because I don't have any to spare right now. :? ) and I know that if I am ever not able to be at a show they will be able to handle the goats in the ring, since mom won't. :rofl:

    OH!! That explains everything!! Teach me to show a goat for someone who has been in goats for YEARS!! :lol Now, I know why everyone gives me the yearlings. I guess it's a good thing I like to show. :D
     
  11. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    Caprina has been shown last summer. She's probably just being stubborn. I like to get my does used to walking with my prior to showing them. The best way to learn how to work with your goats is to attend a show. If everything goes as planned, we will be having our goat club show in Big Timber, MT on June 14. It would be great to have you there. Kathie
     
  12. Little Moon

    Little Moon New Member

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    Thank you everyone. I really appreciate the advice - I will keep trying. I am just a little nervous that I have bit off more than I can handle. I am a city girl - no 4H, no FFA, no background in anything remotely ag related, but I really love this stuff. But I have to "learn" every aspect of it - nothing inherent here :nooo

    I am only planning on showing one or two does, and a buck. Being my first show I really don't need something in every class - I want to be able to observe.

    Kathie - I haven't worked with Caprina yet just Glenda. I have been trying to do this on the milk stand - maybe not the best idea. I will bring a show collar out tomorrow and hopefully we will learn the difference between "show clothes" and "everyday attire" :p

    Caprina is looking very close. She has lost her ligaments and is starting to bag up, she is real sunk in on her sides and her back end is really getting swollen/puffy looking, but no discharge yet. I will keep you posted on any changes.


    Thanks again everyone - you have no idea how much I appreciate the advice.

    ~Anne
     
  13. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    Caprina was put in with Rocky on 11/25 and I saw him bred her on 12/3. I'm not sure if he bred her before the third. So, she is close and will kid within the next two weeks if that breeding took.
    When I work with my does, I don't train them for show on the milk stand. I walk them and set them up just as I would do it in the show ring. I, too, grew up in the city. I showed cats with CFA as a kid, but did not show any livestock until 2000. You don't handle cats when they are in the show ring. This was all new to me. I'm still not as proficient at handling goats in the show ring as lots of the folks there, but I do it anyway. I like the time I spend with other goat people and I do get a better idea of my goats' qualities by showing them. Even after all the shows I've done, if I have a doe I think stands a good chance of placing in the GCH lineup, I will sometimes have one of my more experienced friends show her. Kathie
     
  14. Shykid Acres

    Shykid Acres Guest

    I just worked at setting up the little doelings while my DH fed them their evening milk. Rissa was great! Kala on the other hand was very touchy and skittish. Hmmm? Kala does seem like the more skittish of the two but in my unexperienced eye she looks a little better in body confirmation too. I'm not really sure though. Maybe I should set up another post with their pics and let experienced ones say. ? Just a thought.
     
  15. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    :biggrin What a lot of you are forgetting....most judges judge more "on the move" than posing. Especially Jr. does. It's REALLY hard to hide faults on the move. :lol
    Kaye