Sericea Lespedeza

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Agape Oaks, Feb 28, 2008.

  1. Agape Oaks

    Agape Oaks New Member

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  2. Narrow Chance

    Narrow Chance New Member

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    It's easy to grow. It's considered an undesirable plant.. and sometimes a weed grass. ( in Mississippi) Ranks right up there with Cogan grass if you ask me.. would love to have it here instead of this cogan grass, which is almost taking over one of our fields.
    It's a tall grass.. coarse.. would think that the goats would need to be eating it when tender.
    I have read somewhere though that the protien and nutrient level is somewhere near alfalfa. (don't quote me on that)
    That's about all I know.. except it grows on roadsides and highways here. AND.. I just love that name. Sort of rolls off your tounge. Course.. it's better if a redneck like me drawls it out. Sort of sounds like casting a spell. :rofl Better yet.. it would make a real nice curse word. :rofl
     

  3. Agape Oaks

    Agape Oaks New Member

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    OK- guess I'll try growing some. May try using the word on my kids too & maybe scare them into behaving right :)
     
  4. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    Be sure that you get the right kind if you gonna plant this stuff....lots of lespedeeza's out there, and some of them make bushes. This that you are talking about is very deep rooted, very drought tolerant. Seeds are about the size of sand, but quail and other ground type birds will really flock to this stuff in the fall and winter.

    We planted this in wildlife management for many different species....but understand this, it is kinda hard to get rid of.....it spreads well on ground that has been disturbed.........many coal strip pits, dirt roadsides, steep banks, and the like are reclaimed using this stuff, as it can survive on some of the poorest ground around.

    I encourage you to research this plant and its relatives real good before planting it.....also look into the proper way to plant it as well.....we used a grain drill on most of ours, but have had some success with just scratching the ground up with a disc, sowing, and then lightly cover it. Get it to deep in heavy soil and it won't come up......don't cover it at all and the birds will eat a bunch of it.

    Don't look for late winter or spring browse with this plant as it will be mostly dormant then.

    Whim
     
  5. Agape Oaks

    Agape Oaks New Member

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    Thanks Whim. I plan to just plant a little bit of it this year & see how it does. I have a large pen that gets very dry & I think that may be a good place to plant it. No need for late winter or spring browse as I have LOTS of bamboo. I used to hate the bamboo as it spreads everywhere, until I found out how much the goats enjoy it....& keep it under control :)
     
  6. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    Your welcome :biggrin

    and just in my opinion here.....I found that small game...quail, rabbits, etc. (rats....and of course then you include there predator, SNAKES :lol) ,..... got much more benefit from it than anything else. I often seen deer standing around, and bedding down in it, but how much they actually eat IMO, was very minimal.....we have so much honeysuckle and privet hedge down here that deer really eat so much of it, that they often will just nibble around on a lot on other edible plants that are available.

    Whim
     
  7. LMonty

    LMonty New Member

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    theres some research on this plant, that it helps with worm load. IIRC from my reading on it a couple of months back, cattle will eat it early, dont seem to like it mature.

    This, along with chickory, seemed like a good choice to overseed into my little hay field. A little bit of them added to the clover and vetch and the alfalfa I'd like to add to would help with nutrition and worm load. Looks like a win-win. Might not want to mention to your neighbors that you planted it on purpose, though :)
     
  8. Bella Star

    Bella Star New Member

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    I bought the bio-colored Lespedeza seed, It's suppost to grow 5-10 ft. tall. I am planting it across the whole front as it has a pretty pink blooms. If it spreads , thats good as I am sick of the bahai grass. I hope to plant it along the fence row as it is suppost to be bushy and wildlife loves it and the main thing is to help with the worm problem here in E. Texas humid wettish weather.
     
  9. Rose

    Rose New Member

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    We have it on our place in Missouri. It grows faster than the deer can eat it. It gets tall and woody. Hard to mow because it just lays over. Cows don't like it mature in hay.

    Goats eat the heck out of it when we go out and cut it for them. They ate all of it in their own grazing area.
     
  10. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    """seemed like a good choice to overseed into my little hay field."""" L.

    If the conditions are right for this stuff to grow......trust me, you will no longer have a hay field in a couple years....it will be choked out.


    You will find that it is the new and tender growth on these plants that will be eaten the most.

    Whim
     
  11. Tim Pruitt

    Tim Pruitt New Member

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    Where do you get seed on Sericea Lespedeza? So far, I haven't been able to find it. I have a small pasture that I would like to plant a sample plot in.
     
  12. CGFarm

    CGFarm New Member

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    It is considered a noxious weed here in Kansas and our county makes us spray for it on the road ways and ditches. The goats of course love it out in the pasture.