Selling milkers after kidding question

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Feral Nature, Dec 19, 2007.

  1. Feral Nature

    Feral Nature New Member

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    I will be selling half my milkers after they freshen this spring and want to do it right.

    I want to keep them long enough to make sure that the new owners can handle the newly fresh udders, make sure the udders are not too congested, and make sure the girls are healthy post kidding.

    So how long should I keep a milker before sending her off happily and healthily to her new home? I will have way too many to keep and milk and want to sell them asap if possible as healthy fresh milkers.

    I worry so much about the new owners not being able to handle the volume of milk, hypocalcemia, mastitis, everything.
     
  2. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    I want most of the lochia cleared up, the doe milking well with no congestion and then I fit the teats and temperments to the new owners. If I am selling to seasoned folks I don't worry about it as much.

    About 2 weeks for new people, I have them show up for morning milking so they can deal with the doe and hand milk her, I won't send her home with them if they don't grasp :) the idea of milking pretty quickly. If she is milking gangbusters I do advice them to milk her 3 times a day if I think that with being full at 12 hours she maybe to hard for them to start her off. I send home feed, alfalfa pellets, written instructions. Vicki
     

  3. Feral Nature

    Feral Nature New Member

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    Thanks Vicki. I want to have all of this firmly in my mind ahead of time so I can give definite answers to perspective buyers. I like the idea of them having to show up for morning milking. It will give both me and them food for thought on the doe(s) in question. I would think showing the new buyers how to take a temp while the doe is being milked would be helpful too. it would show them how to do it and protect the seller. I take alot of temps in my milkroom trying to stay ahead of hypocalcemia and want the buyers to also.


    So much to think about as I am already in grieving over the good ol' gals I know i will be letting go this spring.
     
  4. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Well if they come from me, they will ask to come at milking time. I tell them to watch the owner or if you can go into the barn, get the doe yourself, put her up on the milkstand yourself...and to expect young new milkers to be confused who you are, and especially if you have children (they should be kept quiet during milking), but the doe should at least not be freaking out crazy like. Milk her like normal, milk her with one hand. Pick up her feet and maybe even have the owner show you how to trim her feet. Also ask for milkstand grain and some hay she is used to. Read tattoo's and get paperwork (and all who get milkers from me are falling over laughing with that one, I am the worlds worst at putting off tattooing! Paperwork on CAE testing etc...on the doe or the herd. That's pretty much what I tell folks to expect, ask of breeders. Vicki
     
  5. Truly

    Truly New Member

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    If you sell off the mama's what you gonna feed the babies?
     
  6. wheytogosaanens

    wheytogosaanens New Member

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    Hopefully your remaining does will be producing enough to cover the other doe's kids.

    For example, Titania will milk 14 lbs. at 2 weeks fresh...enough for hers and up to 4 more! Most good dairy goats should be able to feed 4 kids, of course, if you are dam raising, then you will need a "nurse doe" that will take any kids, not just her own. And of course, as the kids grow and their demands increase, so should the does' milk be increasing.

    Camille
     
  7. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Plus you have to sell some doelings, and you have to get rid of bucklings, sell them, eat them, give them away. My pet pevee is dairy folks complaining about how expensive their goats are yet they have pens full of unsold bucks and wethers drinking all the milk that the doelings should be drinking if you don't have milk sales.

    I wish I could wish on every single person for just one month...that your milk sales, kid sales, soap sales etc. had to feed your goat habit. You would so instantly have a different way of looking at things.

    There is a commercial dairy goat site on yahoo, when asked not one of them folks can tell me just how much they are making when they sell their kids to Dan Considine...replacer, labor, extra space, unsold milk, meds etc...not one answered. That is no way to run a business and it's why so many dairies fail. Vicki
     
  8. Gabe

    Gabe New Member

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    Bucklings can be made into nice rabbits ;) i like them with white wine gravy.
    Nothing the public likes to hear, and if you tell openly, you are risking to get PITA on your door steps. :crazy
     
  9. MayLOC

    MayLOC New Member

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    =========================

    :rofl :rofl I am so used to reading and deciphering all the abbreviations like LOL and DH and so forth that I read right over your PITA and deciphered it out as ...Pain In The A%% (well not a very nice word that starts with A ;)) Now not sure if you did that on accident or on purpose --the PITA instead of PETA . Anyhow...my laugh for the morning. :yeahthat
     
  10. wheytogosaanens

    wheytogosaanens New Member

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  11. J-Basqo

    J-Basqo New Member

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    Getting rid of the boys right away is a good idea. When I first got into goats the plan was to have milk and meat. I had considered all the options, breeding to a boer and raising the kids as meat, breeding to a dairy and raising the wethers as meat, and selling, keeping or butchering unwanted doelings etc.. But I actually recently decided myself that the bucklings (if not spoken for) will be eaten as "rabbits" (I thought that was cute Gabe). I butchered an older wether last summer.. Not only are they BIG and it is more time consuming to finish the project, but unless you cook them right they still taste like a goat!LOL And it really is NOT cost effective to "raise" them as meat wethers ESPECIALLY if they are 100% dairy (which is what I decided to breed to). They havent added any extra to the feel bill when they hit the ground wet. :biggrin Besides! Then you have ALL that extra milk!
     
  12. Gabe

    Gabe New Member

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    MayLOC isn't the PETA a PITA ? :O
    I just saw a show about them on HBO. This woman is sick.
    But I guess, this is off topic and might need to be deleted :really
     
  13. Feral Nature

    Feral Nature New Member

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    I appreciate the comments while I was absent baking cookies :lol

    I get rid of bucklings real early too now. It was knowledgeble folks here who kept telling me they were costing me, yep, they were right! Now we butcher them real young, about 6-8 weeks if we don't sell them right away. I won't sell even a skinny dairy buckling/wether for less than $50. though as the meat is at least worth that to us. We depend on goat meat and chicken for the bulk of our meat. This year we will be adding pigs to the farm.

    So the bucklings are a liability but we butcher early to save resources. I would rather focus my energies on doelings anyway.
     
  14. Sharon

    Sharon New Member

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    I usually wait 3 weeks or even a month on a first freshener that way i know how she is producing and what is "normal' (afterall Diane we are talking LM's here!! :twisted) for her so when the new owner calls and says "she is doing this" I can say Oh that means.....and I know the health of the doe after she is "cleaned out " from kidding. I would also add to what Vicki said about health records to have them taste the milk...especially if this is a new goat adventure for them. I trim one foot while they watch and get them to trim the other 3 while I watch and give pointers if needed. I will be right there with you in selling some does this spring....looking to keep some doe kids and do some rebuilding.
     
  15. MayLOC

    MayLOC New Member

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    oh I agree 10000% :biggrin That was the funny part...the way I deciphered it was truly fitting! I will stay on topic now ;)
     
  16. Ashley

    Ashley New Member

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    I just don't think I could kill them strait away like that. I'm just a big baby.... Even if I did manage to do it, I'd probably thow up. I had to kill a young chick, probably about 4 weeks old, that my dog injured. I hit it in the head with a rock, and then bawled for about an hour. :nooo

    Shot a deer once, and that didn't bother me near as much.

    Bad enough when they are adults, at least then it's not so terribly sad. I wish I could get better about that, but I just have a hard time butchering (that is killing, the work afterwards is fine) anything. Nothing sweeter than a baby goat either.

    What is the usual method with the newborns?
     
  17. Melissa

    Melissa New Member

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    hmmm, anyone know if carbon monoxide poisining from say, a car muffler, would make the meat uneatable? I would think that's a very painless way to do it. I don't think I could use something like a hammer to bash their little heads in and I would think a gun would be too much. drowning? that is my "worst way to die" scenario so that's out. any other suggestions

    -Melissa
     
  18. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    When doing this at birth for BARF, husband just macheted their heads off, they bled out and were gutted skinned and cut into pieces with an axe...I was thinking about this just yesterday, cutting my protein blocks in half with the same axe. When I used to kill nearly all bucklings born when I daired I drowned them. A 5 gallon bucket filled with water, the kid placed in, and another 5 gallon bucket of water put on top. We raised hogs back then, the breeding stock would eat all kids, placentas, spolied milk, transitional milk that we couldn't sell.

    I was taught by a dairyman to simply sling their heads into a post, I couldn't do that. And the idea of shooting a squirming kid at close range was just dangerous. And yep a thread we can delete after it runs it course.

    When dairying and going to Shreevport to pick up some does from a judge friend, I was complaining to him about the shear cost of raising kids. He very nonchalantly showed me his kid pens and you could see quickly there were no bucklings. Presold bucks were kept, shipped at 3 weeks, the rest he killed at birth. I was shocked, I was in goats about 3 years at that time. But putting pen to paper the whole ride home from there, it does make economical sense, especially since we also sold colostrum to the zoo.

    You can't show me on paper, other than presold registered bucks, how you can raise them and sell them for meat and make money, paying for everything including your labor. Its way too much work to do this for free. Vicki
     
  19. Ashley

    Ashley New Member

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    Oh my, could just never drown them. Someone else would have to kill them I guess (hatchet sounds like the way to go). Then I would have to take them from there. But I don't have many goats, and have plenty of land which saves on feed through the summer, so I prefer to just grow them out I think. Then it's not so terribly sad, they had a nice life and they don't look like little babies anymore. And I'm sure it's still cheaper than buying meat (grass fed anyway!).
     
  20. Melissa

    Melissa New Member

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    well, unless you can sell the milk their's not much else you can use it for. but I'd think that you do need to butcher them before you have to start feeding supplemental feed or meds.

    -Melissa