Question about possibly poisonous tree...

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by paulaswrld, Sep 22, 2008.

  1. paulaswrld

    paulaswrld New Member

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    I have not yet found the name, but have several trees on the property that are dropping small grapefruit size green balls, an elderly neighbor told me they are called "cow killers" and asked if they are also poisonous to goats....anyone know? I assume they are native to the south, as I never saw ne before in the Maryland area.

    Thanks always,

    Paula
     
  2. homeacremom

    homeacremom New Member

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    Google hedge apples and see if that's what it is. Almost sure it is...and deer love them according to my hunting dh...
     

  3. homeacremom

    homeacremom New Member

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    Oh and what I've heard are that cows can get them stuck in the esophagus and suffocate. NOT poisonous. HTH
     
  4. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    I'm almost certain that Sondra has posted the right link to it.......we have many of these in the south. It's commonly called mock orange around here. Never heard anybody say anything about it being poisonous.

    Just as a side note.....it was one of the woods that made great longbows. When cut and dried properly, it is a very hard and springy type wood.....being able to flex and then return to it's original position.

    Whim
     
  5. paulaswrld

    paulaswrld New Member

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    Thanks everyone...that is exactly what it is!

    Paula
     
  6. doublebowgoats

    doublebowgoats Active Member

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    We always called them horse apples. Supposedly good for keeping bugs out of the house. Never worked for us tho!
     
  7. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    my mother used to cut them into slices and dry them then use in flower arrangements etc. can't remember what all but can tell you this if they were poison all the animals in NE would be dead :)
     
  8. Amanda Lee

    Amanda Lee Member

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    We call those Bo Doc trees. That is some of the best fence building tree!
    They are all over the South. They life acidic gray clay soil.
     
  9. coso

    coso Guest

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osage-orange We have them here in MOMO land too. There is actually a small community near Springfield, MO thats named Bois d'Arc. I used to bowhunt on public land there near it.
     
  10. stacy adams

    stacy adams New Member

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    That's what they're called here Bois D'Arc (pronounced Bo Dark) from the Spaniards meaning the Iron Wood tree. Ever tried cutting one? It will dull your chainsaw in a hurry! All kind of things eat them around here, and they can get the size of a softball! They are also reported to keep kritters out of your home if you keep a few in each room.

    a quick funny story... we were looking at the property we now live on back in the days where there was nothing here but the trees. My DH saw this huge fruit on the ground and before I could say anything (I knew what he was going to do) he kicked it..! it budged about an inch and poor Mike was hollering that his toe was broke, there were tears running from my eyes from laughing so hard.. to this day we joke about it.. Iron Wood, Iron fruit! :biggrin
     
  11. stoneyheightsfarm

    stoneyheightsfarm New Member

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    I can attest to them dulling your chainsaw in a hurry. We have more than we care to around here. My husband has gone through 2 chainsaws and more chains than we can count. The shop sees us coming and won't even take our chains for sharpening anymore--the man holds up a new one when he sees me walk in the door. It's got to the place that we take those nasty green balls to the dump rather than our burn pile b/c we don't want any more of those thorn apples (another name to add to the list) on our land! Apparently, they used to plant those trees in rows because they entertwine themselves and are so thorny that they make a natural barrier that nothing will want to pass--I certainly don't!
     
  12. LMonty

    LMonty New Member

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    dont get the white latex sap in your eyes! bad stuff for them. sticky, too. They do repeal insects though, the oldtimers here take one, cut in half and then put the halves in boxes in closets, under the bed and in kitchen cabinets. They swear by it. Ive got one in my hay pasture and plan to try it myself. I read up on it awhile back and IIRC theres been at least one study done somewhere that showed insect repelant activity.
     
  13. Haglerfarm

    Haglerfarm New Member

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    Yes, they call them Bodock here. They make the best fence posts, They never rot. There are still fence posts here that my hubby's great grandfather set. they are still in good shape.
    They are an iron wood.
    They are Osage Orange. You do not see them around her much any more. Farmers pretty much used them all up and people in town don't like them in their yards. We have one on the edge of our work parking lot. It drops their fruit on the cars :)
    Les
     
  14. They make excellent fence posts but you must cut it when the wood is still green. Otherwise you won't cut it very long with a chain say. Very hard and tough when dry. They planted them in shelter belts all along the plains states to block wind. they also make a good fencerow hedge because they are full of thorns and almost inpenetrable by larger livestock when spaced closely together. Of course we all know that goat will go anywhere, thorns or not.

    BTW, how in the world do they manage to eat wild rose bushes, locust trees and blackberry plants anyway? It seems like the thorns would poke holes in their mouthes.
     
  15. stoneyheightsfarm

    stoneyheightsfarm New Member

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    You mean when the wood is still orange? It's never "green" :)
     
  16. Alright, don't be a smart-alec. :rofl And remember, you'd better get some steeples into those new fence posts while they are still "green" too or you'll bend every steeple you own trying to nail a fence to those old posts. (the voice of experience here) When we have to fix wire up to these anchient posts (still standing and strong after 60 years or more) we usually have to use pieces of wire to tie the new wire to the old post.