Question about dry yearling 's precocious udder

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Secondairy, Aug 17, 2008.

  1. Secondairy

    Secondairy Member

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    I have a dry yearling Togg doe who has a slight precocious udder. She is slightly unbalanced, with the right being slightly more developed than the left when viewing from the rear. She has a lump within the center udder itself, not in the teats, and not attached to her body. It feels free floating, like I can grasp it within the udder itself. It is firm and smooth, about the size/shape of a small breed chicken egg. Doe has no problems with me palpating it, doesn't seem to cause any pain, and you cant tell it is there unless you manually feel for it. I have another dry yearling also with a precocious udder, same sire, related dam's and she has a normal feeling udder. I was thinking that perhaps she may have been injured by kicking, or came down on something hard, and the result is scar tissue?

    Vet is coming out this week - I can see if he would be willing to aspirate it and lab check contents, but I didn't want to subject her udder to additional trauma if this could be considered a normal happening. I am really not all that keen on the idea of sticking a needle into an area that could deem the value of the animal. I get yearly CAE, CL, Jones, and Brucellosis testing on all of our goats this time of year.

    Any thoughts?

    Kelly :)
     
  2. Secondairy

    Secondairy Member

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    The suspense is killing me...I don't know whether I should be scared sh*tless about this or if it is something not to worry about until she freshens. I'll take any ideas!

    Kelly :)
     

  3. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Well I would not let a vet aspirate the contents of a lump inside the udder.

    I would put the doe on naxcel and palpate the lump to see if you and the naxcel can break this up. It's likely a cyst filled with staph. I would also infuse her with a dry cow in which I have put some gentemycin in it.

    Or do absolutly nothing but the naxcel and let her freshen.

    Get them bred as soon as they hit weight for you, it's one of the reasons I started freshening early, we have alot of normal percocious udder and I hated letting them be dry for such a long period of time. Vicki
     
  4. Secondairy

    Secondairy Member

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    Thanks for the info Vicki - this yearling and the other one are about 125 lbs. (weight tape measure) One born March '07, and late May '07 for the one with the lump. I have no idea what their weights were last fall as we didn't have them then. From the size of these girls, I would say that they probably had at least 90 lbs. each on them by last October (if they grew like ours did). They are about 30 lbs. heavier than our girls of the same age. Both does are with "their" buck right now, one came into a standing heat and was bred, the other has not yet come around yet. I am keeping them in with him untill they 'miss' their next heat.

    Question - will the Naxcel cause any problems with pregnancy this early on? She stood for the buck on the 13th, and he has all but lost interest in her, but instead has been blubbering his fool head off to the other doe.

    If I were going to infuse her, would I do both sides? The lump is dead center with the MSL. I do have Naxcel - would I treat her as acute, or do this like a low grade systemic? In general I hate to medicate with antibiotics unless absolutely necessary, however, I wouldn't want her udder to be compromised, or worse yet, her entire system. We are basically breeding for our own use, but dont want to be ignorant to their well being.

    Thank you again Vicki, I will consult with the vet about the mass just so that he has it on record in case I need any additional meds.

    Kelly :)
     
  5. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Why does it seem stuff like this comes up right as does are bred! Maybe this is hormonal? Honestly I wouldn't be treating a doe during implantation (11 days or so) and even then it would be freaking me out to treat her the first 50 days.

    So how about letting it go, maybe hormonal and it will go down when she is more pregnant, plus her immune system will be super high during pregnancy.

    Watch her and then treat if it doesn't go away or improve.

    Have you had goats awhile? If not do you have a mentor who can feel of this lump for you? Is it a lump or a flaw in the medial? Vicki
     
  6. Secondairy

    Secondairy Member

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    I have had goats for 4 years - and I dont think I am near seasoned yet, which is why I was THRILLED to be invited to this board! I have done alot of homework prior to getting goats. Things to watch for, how to treat, and I have still lost a few here and there. 1 premie kid who was born more than 10 days early, only 2 lbs. 9 oz., both eyes still partially sealed, his fur was shorter than velvet, and he was unable to walk or stand for over a week - died at 6 weeks when he finally began eating solids. We worked that baby 24/7, and although I knew he could die at any moment, we got attached. We also lost a gorgeous SG *B kid to a probable twisted gut, lost a senior buck to head trauma (not sure how, but that was the only explanation for cerebral hemorrhaging, and a broken neck upon necropsy), and lost our herd queen this early summer due to poisoning. She was deliberately poisoned, and I know who did it, I just cant prove it :sniffle.

    Back to topic! The mass is within the udder tissue itself, free floating and is not attached to the skin of the udder, nor is it a lump on the udder. I don't think it is a flaw or defect of the MSL, as it is not visible, but you have to feel for it, that was just for location reference. I have one goat breeder fairly local that I can try to see if I can bring the doe to her place and have her look (although I would prefer if Heather would come here). There is a Togg breeder in NJ, he may check it out for me, but I have never met him before, and I don't know what his animal husbandry practices are. The rest are 4-H'ers, and although I love livestock kids dearly and still wish there were more in our county, none of them have enough experience. Many are on their first year projects, and most are under 13. Unfortunately, my mentor is 7 hours away :( There is also the one Boer guy I get my best grass hay from (who still shakes his head that I feed my goats that good hay...LOL!), but as much as he knows, he breeds for the meat market, and doesn't milk, so I don't know if he would be any help in this particular case.

    I am glad that you agree not to treat her this early on in her possible pregnancy. If she doesn't cycle again, I will feel her udder and see if it shrinks on it's own, or get Heather over to have a looksie. She has LaManchas, does DHIR, LA's, and shows, so she is probably me best bet for an outside hands on opinion!

    Kelly :)