Question about breeding after kidding

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Brit.Tex, Mar 10, 2008.

  1. Brit.Tex

    Brit.Tex New Member

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    Remember my FF doe - the one that was bred at 5(!) months (of course SHE decided, not me) and kidded out twins?

    Well, her udder is beautiful and her teats have gotten a bit longer, so I can milk her now. Of course, with one kid on her, she doesn't give a great deal - about a pint once a day. The nights have been chilly enough that I didn't want to shut her daughter away from her.

    She stands perfectly to be milked, and willingly gives what she has. She's going to be a wonderful milker.

    Now, back to the title question... we have let the buck run with the does while they were pregnant and after kidding, because after all, he can't breed a doe that is pregnant. They all get along very nicely.

    Only.. from the front porch yesterday we noticed this doe and the buck "playing." Then we saw her wag her tail... DH started for the pasture to put the buck up, but... TOO LATE. We saw him breed her.

    Now, my question... is this likely to "take?" Her kid is 2 months old exactly. The doe is first generation Mini Nubian. I've already done the calendar calculations to know when to expect more babies.

    The buck is now put up, a bit like closing the barn door after the horse gets out, I know.
    We did let him run with the does all winter after breeding as he does get lonely by himself. (He is such a sweet natured, gentle buck - if he didn't have that powerful aroma he'd be a real pet!)

    Anyway... lesson learned. Put buck up when does begin kidding and do not let him run with them anymore until breeding is desired.

    I had hoped to let this doeling GROW a bit this year before breeding again. :(

    How long should I keep milking the doe? Until about two months before kidding? Is her kid ready to wean as she's two months old? I would just dry her off now - but I'm told that will affect the length of her lactation cycle every time if she is dried off after only two months.

    (Hanging head... I'm so appalled that she's bred again! She just turned one year old this month!)
     
  2. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    personally on this particular doe I would lute her and abort any babies in abt 20 days. or wait and see if she comes back into heat in 17 to 21 days first and if not then lute her. But this is my opinion because she was too young in the first place and doesn't need this pulling her down now too.
     

  3. Brit.Tex

    Brit.Tex New Member

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    Thanks Sondra - I wondered if it was safe to abort goats. I know they can do it for dogs! Is there a possibility of pyometra when a doe is aborted? I know that sometimes happens to dogs....
     
  4. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Since she isn't likely to have another heat even if not bred, I would use 2cc IM of lutelyse on her in 21 days. A doe who kids in late winter naturally cycles in 8 weeks.

    In a normal situation a doe who is bred back and is in good shape, can milk all the way until she is 100 days bred, kid again and milk a full lactation. But your doe is far from in good shape having kidded way to young, and now bred again. It would be responsible for you to abort her, since it was your fault you let her stay with the buck. Controlling bucks is part of owning livestock and being responsible.

    Your overall herd health, and the quality of your stock declines when doelings are allowed to be bred young, kid and kid and kid again, and not just the inbreeding problem. And unless this buck was really young himself, most 5 month old doelings who are bred are bred by their brothers, not a full grown buck. Vicki
     
  5. Brit.Tex

    Brit.Tex New Member

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    Thanks Vicki for pointing out what I already knew and had already taken responsibility for - the fact that the buck was with the does when he should not have been, although I didn't know that the does will cycle that fast after birth.

    And I do plan to abort her. I wasn't aware that it was possible for me to do that without detriment, and I'm glad that there's an alternative to letting the pregnancy progress. I really don't want her bred, as I said, I want to give her the chance to grow.

    And just for the record, the buck was penned separately from all the does in a pipe corral with two inch cattle panel sides that are six feet tall. And she STILL got in to be bred at 5 months of age. HE didn't get out. At the time he bred her, he was around 8 months old and no relation to her.
     
  6. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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