Pulsation?

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by paulaswrld, Oct 7, 2008.

  1. paulaswrld

    paulaswrld New Member

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    What is a good pulsation? I noticed recently at a show that my new milk machine (also my first) seems to be running way slower than the folks around me. I have been hand milking and now started using the milk machine....all of a sudden I have two lopsided does out of 7. I am running milk cultures to our state vets office in the AM to check out the smaller sides...but, after reading this have to wonder if my new machine has contributed???

    Thanks always,

    Paula
     
  2. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    I'm using 70:30 and 13-14#'s of vaccum. Some have even gone to 80:20. (Not sure I want to go that fast yet.) Even some of the cow dairies have upped the pulsations. I haven't had one flare up since I increased the pulsations AND SWITCHED from the plastic shells to the old Delaval Stainless Steel shells. I am also using a triangle shaped inflation. The girls milk out much faster, the teat ends don't get pinched in the inflation and everyone just tested "no growth" on a milk test sent out. Even though I will still dry treat anyone coming off the milk line.
    :biggrin MANY THANKS, KEN!!!
    I've also tweaked my udder prep. I pre-dip with a 1% iodine solution, wait about 1-2 min. then use a diaper wipe, wipe all the iodine off, squirt out the first couple squirts, apply the inflations. When she's done...I remove and don't dip my inflations in a wash solution, they have air sucked through them to help "dry" the inside of the inflation. Just a "shot" of air. The doe is stripped, and teat dipped to go out. I quit dipping the inflations when I read several articles on "magic water"....the water left in the inflations and wet teats.<shrug> just my way of doing things around here and like anything else...debateable.
    Kaye
     

  3. paulaswrld

    paulaswrld New Member

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    How do I know if I am 70:30 or ???

    Thanks,

    Paula
     
  4. Rambar Ranch

    Rambar Ranch New Member

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    Kay where are you getting triangle shaped inflations from? and do they fit in a normal shell or would they also fit in a plastic shell?

    Paula, to determine your pulsation rates depends on the type of pulsator you have. If you have an interpulse type pulsator theres a plastic clip inside when you take the lid off that has the number inside. Mine are 60:40 as thats just what they came with when used from a dairy.

    Ray
     
  5. The Triangle Inflations that Kaye uses is made for the 06 Develal shells. You can still buy them as they are the most used shell on the market today even after coming out in the 70's. If I remember right the number of them are Milk-Rite LTC-D1. They are high flow inflations.

    I try to get people away from the little plastic shells with goats since they are made for low production and have no weight to them. ALSO, with the goat inflations there is no lifetime on them. They just say can milk twice as long as rubber. Well, what rubber ones are they talking about...some have a lifetime of 1200 milkings and some have a lifetime of 3600 milkings. So, what do you suppose to double?

    If you are talking about they way sound are with milking machines there is no way you can tell if they are 50:50, 60:40, 65:35, or 70:30. The only thing you can count is the pulsation rate. That is how many beats per second they have. The numbers are the ratio of Milking phase to Rest Phase. Pulsation rate can range from 40 per second up to 90 per second. But, that really does not matter as some people think that it does. Since, its the ratio that is more of a factor on teat in end health.

    Ken
     
  6. paulaswrld

    paulaswrld New Member

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    The ratio, does that mean say....70:30 is 70 clicks in 30 seconds? Or, and I completly off? I will open it up tmr. It is the one that came new with the Caprilite dual milker. I will also call Furney Register and see if he might know. All I do know is that I have been using it regularly for 4 weeks now and have 3 very lopsided does...and one of them was 1st place udder several times this year. I really need to figure this out.....I however, have been doing what I guess is the "magic water" in between does so I would love to read more about that.

    My inflations are also triangular, they are the silicone goat inflations SP6000, the verdict for me is still out on them as they seem heavy and are difficult to clean.

    Thanks for any and all advice,

    Paula
     
  7. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    Ray,
    Here's where I found the 06 shells. I've still got to order more to rig the other bucket. Course, mine came with Ken. :biggrin Best of all..the dang things don't crawl up the teat to the udder floor like the plastic ones did. Yeah, they're heavier and hang like they are suppose to.

    63098 Delaval 06 Replacement
    http://partsdeptonline.com/cgi-bin/...oduct=108&cart_id=3026844.4455&exact_match=on

    Here's the inflations: TLC-D1
    http://partsdeptonline.com/cgi-bin/...oduct=77&cart_id=1928812.21280&exact_match=on

    Paula, "magic water" is referred to as the water that pools at the top of the inflation or just under the rim. It's called magic water because one monent it's there and then it's gone. At worst wet inflations can cause liner slip, creating impact forces and damage to the teat ends. It is recommended that teats are washed and DRIED before inflations applied. So logically...why would you put a dry teat in a wet inflation?

    This is Ken's expertise...not mine. I am just following advice that makes sense to me. And re-reading the basics of milking.
    Kaye
     
  8. OK...the ratio is something most people dont understand. At first it seems hard to put your mind around but, after awhile it comes to you.

    Lets use a ratio of 60:40 since its the most common one on the market now. Also, being all over the internet to use. The ratio of 60:40 means basically...in one beat its milks for 60% of the time and rests for 40% of the rest. Now, here is the tricky part. When they say milk...most people think that is when it is squeezing the teats...but its reverse of that. The milk phase is when the liner is open as much as it can be...to draw milk into the teat canal. The rest phase is where it collopes around the teat. Since, the vaccum in the pulsation lines are at the lowest, the vaccum in the milk line is then stronger, so it squeezes the teat.

    The higher the ratio is say go up to a 70:30. There is more pressure on the teat end though out the milking. So, the higher the ratio the lower you want your vaccum level to be. Where as the lower the ratio the higher the vaccum can be. BUT, there is a FINE line you must walk when you go to playing with the vaccum levels. That will depend on your animals and the type of system that you are running on what level of vaccum you can use. The more buckets or longer the hoses are the more vaccum you will need. There is NO magic number that the perfect number with vaccum.

    "Magic Water" is water that is left on the milking unit from any source. It may be from the wash water to dipping the machines. You have to be sure, that they are dry before they are applied to any animal. As this will cause, liner slips, higher bacteria counts, and even uneven udders. That is why if you read any udder products they will state...wash and DRY the teats from all water. Also, just a side point...its called udder wash...but you ONLY wash the teats. No point in getting the whole udder wet before milking, as this might cause unwanted dirty water in the milk.

    Uneven udders can be caused by a whole different things. From milking machine errors, unclean teats, or even gentics of the animals. To find out what is going on, first get a culture on the milk. That why you know what you are dealing with. There are ALOT of bacteria that is causing mastisis in herds. The staph, strep are most of the time caused by unclean milking habits. That includes not getting the machine clean between milkings, not cleaning teats off well or just dirty bedding. The fast to tell if its a milking machine error is to look at the teat ends after you take the machine off. They should be a bright clear white ring around the oriface of the teat. If its red...to much vaccum or leaving the machine on for to long. Also, with this type of error all the animals will be light on one side of the udder thoughout the herd. Genetics play a big part on uneven udders. Some sires will produce animals that are heavy on one side. Or even totally blind on one side, prime example of that is a bull called Folic in the Milking Shorthorn breed. Over half of his daughter were blind on both the hind quarters.

    No inflations should be hard to clean, or they would not be on the market. The first step is to rinse the unit with warm water...about 95 degrees. Then you must wash with a dairy soap and HOT water. The water out of the tap is not hot enough to do a good job. It must be about 165 degrees to get the milk out of all the little cracks in the rubber. Where as most of the water out of homes are about 125 at best. Then run an acid rinse in COLD water. That just makes it where the bacteria that is still there is killed. All the acid does is lower the pH of the water, and most will have sometype of cleaning agent with it.

    Ken
     
  9. paulaswrld

    paulaswrld New Member

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    Thanks so much Ken. I will check the teat ends today....unfortunately, I have dor sure been putting wet inflations on, as I have been dipping then inflations into a clorox/water in between girls...ugh.... The lopsided udder should not be genetics as I am very familiar and have seen the genetics of these girls, well at least dam, sire, granddam and several other milking offspring. I think it is something that occured here.

    I will go out now and check the pulsator.

    Thanks,

    Paula
     
  10. KJFarm

    KJFarm Senior Member

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    Paula,
    I have heard others say that those SP6000 inflations are very hard to clean.
     
  11. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Well Vicki and I have been dipping inflations in clorox water me at least 4 yrs now and no mastitis I would think it has more to do with your pulsation than water on the inflation. I don't disagree with Ken or Kate on this info necessarily but .................
     
  12. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    :lol See...I told you it was a debatable topic. And everyone does it their own way.
    Kaye
     
  13. OK...i have looked up those inflations...I can not see where they would that hard to clean. Since I have used those at some of hte dairy farms that I have worked at and had no problems with them cleaning.

    Ken
     
  14. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Ric hated those inflations also, when he said they were too hard to clean, no way could I do it since he had the cleanest dairy I have ever seen. They were heavy I used them at apparisal once time.

    I do dip inflations, first into soapy water and then into bleach water, hang between milkings. I also don't rush through milking. And since the last post by Ken on him putting inflations on with one hand...I either have too small of hands or I am just not cooridnated enough :)

    I honestly use the inflations I do because they are cheaper, I can afford to replace them yearly and stop before I get burrs or tiny cracks in the inflation.

    No matter what you are doing make sure you do it religiously.

    Paula by any chance are the does with the lopsided udders related...I had a buck throw me 3 daughters I freshened and all three had more milk and a longer teat on one side as they came into production...no more buck and no more daughters and it is a very well known fact in Nubians for this line, I had never heard of. Vicki
     
  15. paulaswrld

    paulaswrld New Member

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    Vicki, No, the does are not related. I also need two hands...LOL...

    Ken, If you saw them you may have seen where the inflations goes from blue to clear. Milk gathers at the edge between the clear area and the blue and I just can't get it all out. They don't come apart, and I have soaked them in bleach water, vinegar, acid wash...so I just canged inflations as my machine came with two sets to be used as a dual milker. I am only using it for one now. But, I can't imagine I can only use the inlations for 3 weeks and then have to move on or use them with this milk ring in them...yuck...

    Pulsator, it says 60/40 but....a big but here....the day I got it I had a friend come over that has been milking for many years and she helped me set it up, she said it was ticking too slow so she used a allen wrench and adjusted the little screw on the back....so, I don;t know what it is now...or maybe that is of no consequence.

    CMT test came back positive on the small side of all 3 does..so I went to the vets today and got a box of Pirsue, Quartermaster and Dex (thanks Vicki). She would net change her mind and give me the gentimysen. She said to use Bio-mycin.

    Her orders: Pirsue infused 2 X a day for 3 days and 4cc Biomycin daily for 3 days.
    Quartermaster as a dry treatment when ready.

    I dropped the milk sample of at Kord, our state vet lab and should get results in 72hrs.....hopefully.

    No fevers, everyone eating and acting fine, no blood in milk and no clumps but is thicker.

    Any improvements or changes you all feel I should make to her orders? I do not care about milk...only the udder.

    Thanks,

    Paula
     
  16. Paula,

    When you wash you equiptment...do you slug the lines with the wash water? Or just put then in the wash vat and let them suck with no slug?

    Ken
     
  17. paulaswrld

    paulaswrld New Member

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    Directly after milking I remove the milk, then I put the inflations into the clorox/water mix and suck that through the lines. Then I bring it in to the kitchen and run water w a dawn no suds soap mixture through the lines using my sink sprayer. I then hang dry inside.

    Thanksm
    Paula