Pregnant yearling with infected pastern area

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Ravens Haven, Jan 21, 2008.

  1. Ravens Haven

    Ravens Haven New Member

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    Hi all,

    I have a yearling doe that is bred and 2 weeks ago I noticed that she was limping well I investing further to find a hole in the rear of her pastern below the dewclaw, I pulled the scab off and all kinds of YUCK pus and chunks of tissue came out I started her on a round of antibiotics and banamine for the pain, she seemed to get better and then today I noticed her starting to swell in that foot again and tonite I put her on the stand the small scab was still there when I removed it the hole was still there and the stuff coming out STINKS and it is yellow goop, yuck. I started her on penicillin again, should I be giving her something stronger or just keep her on Pen for a course of 7-10 days.

    Thanks
    Autumn
     
  2. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    I would flush it out good and keep it open daily as it needs to drain as for the antibiotic will let someone more knowledgeable answer.
     

  3. Feral Nature

    Feral Nature New Member

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    I would also check for a splinter or foriegn body as it seems something made the hole and the resulting infection. I would think a run of penicillin but I am waiting for an answer too. And like Sondra said, flush it out good, perhaps with hydrogen peroxide, twice a day.
     
  4. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    Put some epsom salts in a bucket of warm water and soak her foot in that. The epsom salts will draw out the infection and also possibly any foreign matter. I'd soak that foot twice a day and complete her course of pennicillin. My vet was the one who said to use epsom salts on a doe with an infected foot. It also works well for people. I used it on an infected cat bite to my hand and it healed without my needing any antibiotics.
     
  5. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Tetracycline would actualy be your drug of choice with this. When does get abscess around the coronary band they blow out somewhere your doe simply blew hers out the back. Keep it cleaned out and healing, swelling means it is blocked up again. When you have an abscess they have you syringe peroxide through it several times a day to keep it open and then lather it up and put a bandage on it with some form of ointment, keeping it moist so it doesn't heal over. They do have hoof boots that will fit goats at llamaproducts.com Vicki
     
  6. LMonty

    LMonty New Member

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    when an abcess forms, sometimes it has a thick wall around it as the body tried to wall off the infection to prevent it from spreading. Antibiotics in the blood may not be able to penetrate that wall real well, making it hard for them to get in there and actually kills the germs causing the infection.

    That's the reason for keeping the wound open so the pus can drain out. Flush ( or irrigate it) out daily, (twice a day preferably) with a solution that has a gentle germ killer in it, maybe three ounces of saline mixed with an ounce of betadine or iodine would be my choice to start with, at the very least half strength OTC hydrogen peroxide.

    If its large enough to pack the wound, its not too difficult to do. Take a piece of thin roll gauze (the 1 inch works well, cut it half lengthwise if its too wide for the wound) and dip it in the solution, wring it out so its just barely damp. Then push it slowly into the wound, and cut off any extra, leaving just a little tail coming out (like about a half inch) so you can easily pull it out. Then wrap the pastern with more gauze or a coban type dressing to cover. Then I would pull out the old gauze, irrigate again and repeat the packing procedure at least once a day. I'd be giving the SQ tetracycline in addition to this.

    I'm a nurse that does a lot of wound care, NOT an animal vet! Without seeing it its hard to be sure if this is the right thing for this wound, but from your description, its what I might be doing if it was my doe. I'd also be giving probiotics to reduce the effects of the antibiotic on the infection, vitamins, and making sure she was in good shape nutritonally and supplementing her immune system. I'd be checking her temperature each day at least once. I would expect it to take about three days before I saw much of an improvement and expect to have to do this daily for at least a week. If she got worse at all at any time, or if it didnt improve after those three days, or she started with a fever, I'd be at the vets door.

    Just my thoughts, hope that helps!
     
  7. Ravens Haven

    Ravens Haven New Member

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    Thanks for all your thoughts. I will start her on La-200 today, the hole in her pastern is tiny gonna be really hard to irrigate it, but I will try my best to clean it out and bandage it.

    Thanks
    Autumn
     
  8. LMonty

    LMonty New Member

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    Autumn

    for irrigating really small wounds, an IV catheter ona lare syring is the cats meow! take the needle out of the iv needle and get rid of it. Use the plastic catheter on the syringe, and fill the syringe with your irrigating solution. it will fit in even tiny holes. the pressure it produces when you squirt in the fluid thru the catheter is good for cleaning junk out of the wound.

    really tiny holes can still have big egg sized abcesses underneath them. One way to check is to take Q tip and stick it in and move it around. If it moves around a lot, I'd personally open the hole up a bit more, and use the packing technique, since if it closes up you'll never get that abcess to heal. If you can hardly move it at all, youre good to go- it means the abcess is probably small and should heal up pretty good, hopefully.

    Its so frustrating to try to explain this stuff on line, LOL. Its so much easier to do in person.