Pregnant doe down

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by theshihtzu, Mar 17, 2008.

  1. theshihtzu

    theshihtzu New Member

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    Yesterday morning when I went out to feed, one of my very pregnant does, was down. She's not showing any signs of sickness, such as toxemia. She's not grinding her teeth, and doesn't seem to be in pain. She's eating well, drinking, but she just can't/won't get up on her feet. I've got a call into the vet, and am waiting for him to get out of surgery to call bacl/come out. I've tried to encourage her to move, by lifting her tail (that always gets her moving) but she tries, but just can't get up.
    I've moved her into the milking area, so she dry, warm and comfy. My son helps me mover her around periodically, so she won't get sores.

    I don't know when she's due, as I pen bred this year. Any thoughts? :help
    Thanks,
    Lis
     
  2. Katarina

    Katarina New Member

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    What is her temp?
     

  3. theshihtzu

    theshihtzu New Member

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    I'll go take her temp right now. You're thinking low temp/milk fever?
    Back soon-
    Lis
     
  4. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    It could be any number of things. Taking a temp is the first place to start. Get her temp and get back to us.

    Sara
     
  5. theshihtzu

    theshihtzu New Member

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  6. Katarina

    Katarina New Member

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    Do you know if she hurt her self? Jumping up or off the milk stand. Any toys that she could have hurt herself on in the pen?

    When you say eating fine is that before she went down or are you bringing her food.
     
  7. theshihtzu

    theshihtzu New Member

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    She was eating fine before this, and now I'm having to bring her food/water, but she's eating everything I put in front of her, peeing well, pooping well, drinking water, and chewing her cud. I tend to think it wasn't an injury, as she shows no discomfort when we move her around. It takes some effort, since she's big. I think if she was injured she'd scream, or act stressed.

    I appreciate the help here; vet is still in surgery.
     
  8. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Do a more thorough exam....is she anemic? Look at the FAMACHA info on goatkeeping 101 and look at the color of her eyelids compared to your goats. Is she heavy bred as possibly due tommorrow, today? Is her udder full? How old is she? Can she have quads? Very overweight does heavy with kids can actually go down from the weight of kids on the siatic nerve. Now I have seen this in cows, and I don't think goats get much bigger than mine and I have never had this happen. Is she in with bossy does who butt? What does her breath smell like. Temp is huge and it should always be the first thing you do. Is she chewing her cud? Vicki
     
  9. theshihtzu

    theshihtzu New Member

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    Hi Vickie, eyelids look good (pink) She ~could be due very soon (I don't know the date she was bred); she generally has twins. It's so odd; she seems quite comfortable! She is chewing her cud. We have some pushy does, but I'm not sure what they would have done, since she doesn't show any pain. I'm not sure of her age, I bought her from the dairy where I used to work; I'd say she's 5-6? Her udder is fair sized; she always udders up early, and she's a heavy milker.

    One of my first thought was a "pinched nerve" , or something spinal. She's not paralyzed; when I lift her tail, she slightly moves her legs to try and get up.

    Thanks,
    Lis
     
  10. MayLOC

    MayLOC New Member

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    What is her normal diet?
     
  11. theshihtzu

    theshihtzu New Member

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    UPDATE: The vet prescribed Flunix, and high doses of Vit. B.(20 cc per day) Flunix is a new one to me, but reading up on it, seems like it should be good. She seemed a bit stronger this evening, even before getting the shots; ~trying to get up, and looking for more food. I'm hopeful. I'm thinking that she'll have her kids in the next day or two, and getting the pressure off will make a huge difference. The vet agrees.
    Someone had asked about her normal diet. She eats a grass mix hay that we grow ourselves, and a small scoop of grain mixed with alfalfa pellets. She has salt and mineral available at all times, and well water to drink.

    Thanks everyone. I'll keep you updated as I can.
    Lis
     
  12. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Well am glad to hear she seems to be doing better. I would think tho that she doesn't have enough calcium and that may make for another problem for you yet. a small scoop mixed with alfalfa pellets doesn't give her a well balance calcium ratio most of us give all pg does at least 3 lb of alfalfa pellets alone, per day per doe.
     
  13. theshihtzu

    theshihtzu New Member

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    Sondra, are you saying 3# alfalfa pellets in addition to the hay?
    Lis
     
  14. Kaye White

    Kaye White New Member

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    It's banamine...only CHEAPER and without the trademark price. PreVail is also banamine.
    You definately need to have some type of calcium(oral or injectable) on hand. Increase the amount of alfalfa pellets, like Sondra said. Yes, kidding SOON will take the "pressure off" but does she have enough calcium in her system to go into labor and maintain it to kid? Doubt it.? I'd sure be giving this doe CMPK at least twice a day until she does kid.

    Here's another tidbit...IF the Vitamin B is just plain B-complex...20cc is not a lot, sounds like he's just supporting the rumen. For polio using B-Complex it takes 45cc for 100#'s.
    Kaye
     
  15. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    Goats need alfalfa hay or pellets to keep up their calcium levels. Mine get pellets mixed with their grain, but the hay I feed is alfalfa. On grass hay, they need more alfalfa pellets. If you are growing your own hay, you might want to add alfalfa to your mix this year. Kathie
     
  16. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    yes I am saying 3lbs of alfalfa pellets per goat per day year around when feeding grass hay or grass mix hay.
     
  17. mill-valley

    mill-valley New Member

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    Banamine goes under many names, drug name is flunixin meglumine. The one I use is called VedaGesic. It helps to teach yourself generic names...then the brand names won't confuse you because you can just look at the small writing and know exactly what you have. Just like oxytetracycline is Biomycin, La-200, OxyCure, etc.
     
  18. heather

    heather New Member

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    i'm confused i thought you weren't suppose to give alpha to pregnant goats the last month of pregnancy due to milk fever? is that right?
     
  19. Patty13637

    Patty13637 New Member

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    No that is not right. Feeding Alfalfa stops alot of problems during pregnancy and kiddin and milking. Alfalfa is high in Calcium , low calcium causes lots of problem like milk fever.

    Patty

    Spend some time reading in the goat101 section. Very helpfull info
     
  20. theshihtzu

    theshihtzu New Member

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    I had heard that, too Heather. Our hay is a mixture of grass (I can't remember what kind; DH knows) alfalfa, clover and I'm not sure what else. When I live in AZ, the only hay you could find was pure alfalfa. Wow, did it smell good! People here in Iowa don't grow it since it's not what the farmers want for their cows. Gee, I guess you didn't ask all that, did you? <G>