Poses?

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Beverrlly, Dec 28, 2007.

  1. Beverrlly

    Beverrlly New Member

    168
    0
    0
    OK---how the heck do you get your goats to stand so beautifully for shows/pictures? The only times I've tried they immediately popped back into whatever the heck position THEY wanted to stand in. :help
     
  2. ecftoggs

    ecftoggs New Member

    224
    0
    0
    It usually takes about 10-15 tries to get a picture that is close. So keep taking pictures. When Steve Pope does our Nationals pictures we end up looking through a 100 or so to find the right ones and he is a professional.

    Tim
     

  3. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

    16,497
    0
    0
    You practice, teaching goats pateince. Baths here you are clipped to the fence, bathed carwash style, and stay clipped to the fence in the sun to dry. Teaching them to stand. Offering for anyone who wants to learn how to show a quick mini show, in which they stand and pose your goats for you :) Vicki
     
  4. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

    9,442
    0
    0
    Notice: she said YOU are clipped to the fence and so then I gues the goat tells you what to do :rofl
     
  5. Linda Carney

    Linda Carney New Member

    158
    0
    0
    :rofl Vicki, remember how you invited my kids over to play with the babies last year? If I had known that you really needed the help tutoring your doelings we'd have made it over at least twice a week!

    Patience lessons are great -- it really can bring order to the milk room in a hurry, but don't try it with light weight fencing!

    Linda Carney
    Cedar Leaf Nubians
    Coldspring, Texas
     
  6. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

    16,497
    0
    0
    Sondra, I have a cold, I am on drugs, and I am going to bed :) Vicki
     
  7. Kaye White

    Kaye White New Member

    1,837
    0
    0
    :laughcry Like Tim said....it takes lots of photos to get just one that is spectacular. Reason I have a large card in my digital. It might take me an hr. to get the one perfect shot. One doe I have, I've never been able to get a good shot of! She gets ticked off and does her dead level best to cross her legs, set up like a dairy cow, throw her ears back at just the perfect time, ect.... She will "work" perfect in the show ring but only for a short time. After that, it turns into a match of the wills! At home...forget it.
    Keep taking pics and setting them up. Oh, a full belly also helps just before pictures.
    Kaye
     
  8. Odeon

    Odeon New Member

    283
    0
    0
    I am VERY competitive, and expect my goats to stand when posed. I start at birth.. seriously.. When they are on their lambars, I start "pinching them down" as they nurse, so they get used to having it done. By the time they are mature, I just need to barely touch them, and they straighten that back and stand. A quick jerk on the collar and they primp. If I can't get them to stand for a photo, then I can't expect them to stand for a judge!

    Ken
     
  9. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

    9,442
    0
    0
    ah good idea will start doing that this year with the Nubians hope I get some does
     
  10. Tim Pruitt

    Tim Pruitt New Member

    1,275
    0
    0
    My son in law has a digital camera that will click, click click. You get a lot of photos but you are able to cull out the ones you don't want. My sorry camera waits and then clicks and then waits, waits and then clicks. The goat has already moved a leg or flopped an ear before I can get the picture taken. Don't even try getting a picture with a camera like this.
     
  11. Well...I have a different view of taking pics. I have held a few cows, goats and sheep for pics. The BIG thing with getting that pose is to make sure that they are not use to where you are trying to take the picture. AT cattle show most of the time its WAY off in the back forty. You dont want anything around that they will look at. If we picture at home, we take them on the other hillside and shot the picture with the sky in the back ground. Most of the time FAR away from the barn. That way they are scared and bored at the same time. Then we are FRIM with them....basically...they WILL stand that way and they WILL keep their feet placed. A good tug on the chain or halter does that trick.

    To get the ear set right...get some goofy thing to show them RIGHT as they are ready to click the camera. That will set the ears on the animal. Also making dumb sounds and jumping far away works also.

    Dont think that you are going to get a picture the first few that you take. When we had our champion done at Expo one year it just took about 45 tries till we got one that would work for Hoards. The big thing is dont give up till you get one...if it takes a few tries or a couple of hours. I think the longest I have worked with one was about an hour till we got a picture that would work. That was with a cow that had never been on a halter or even out of the barn really. So, it can be done

    Ken in MI
     
  12. Cotton Eyed Does

    Cotton Eyed Does New Member

    1,918
    1
    0
    You can also try barking like a dog and get that "startled" straight erect look.
     
  13. leslieh

    leslieh New Member

    104
    0
    0
    :lol

    If I did that with our "goofy group of Nubians, the gal would take off and I'd get a picture of the handler's feet as they go flying through the air behind the doe!

    :biggrin

    Leslie
     
  14. Beverrlly

    Beverrlly New Member

    168
    0
    0
    OK--so to get them to straighten their back you pinch the high spot?? This is what I don't get.... :help2
     
  15. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

    16,497
    0
    0
    Each goat has their own special goose point. Most is right before the hips. It also has to do with setting her rear legs correctly. Rear legs should be further out than a natural stance, but not futher back, or when you punch her down her loin drops down. Also her front legs should be right underneath her, pulling up on her head. Vicki
     
  16. Karen Bailey

    Karen Bailey New Member

    141
    0
    0
    Great explanation, Vicki. I'll have to try that when I get to take pictures again. In one of the old goat magazines (from the mid 80's) they recommended that you take pictures of all goats in your herd, every year. Does anyone here do that?
    Karen