pasturization techniques?

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Anita Martin, Mar 9, 2008.

  1. Anita Martin

    Anita Martin Senior Member

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    Other than a home pasturizer, what is the best and most acurate way to pasturize milk for goat kids? I'm doing small batches and it's taking me forever...might just switch to cows milk I guess...much less trouble. I do have one doe though that is still giving really yukky milk. The kids like it just fine, but it is absolutely undrinkable for human use and hate to throw it away...er, feed to the cats, chickens, etc. (We never throw away anything when we have chickens.) :D
     
  2. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    up until this year I used a big canner and a stainless steal pot inside dbl boiler style save your milk and do big batches at a time.. Now I have an elec turkey fryer with thermostat control wonderful investment.
     

  3. Anita Martin

    Anita Martin Senior Member

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    Sondra, You just saved my day! :biggrin And my week! I don't have a turkey fryer, but I DO have a larger deep fryer. I even found the cord that goes with it. :woohoo I never would have thought of that. Now, I just need to see if it works. Have not used it in over a year. It'll sure beat using two saucepans, and standing by the stove while it "cooks." Luckily I only have three babies to feed so far. When you start it out, do you just set it on the temp you want and then start timing after it reaches that temp., or do you have to set it higher and then bring it down? Wow, this is great! THANKS
     
  4. stacy adams

    stacy adams New Member

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    I just can't do the double pot method.. even heat-treating colostrum drives me crazy!! :crazy I will just pour whatever milk I get from a particular milking in to a lg SS pot & turn the flame on. I'll put a thermometer in there just so I can occasionally do a quick check and stir while I'm doing the dishes and other kitchen tasks. Once it gets to 160-165, I'll give it one more stir (with the thermometer) then turn the heat off, put a lid on it and set it to the back of the stove until the next meal. Almost easy as pie! :biggrin
    Though I have to say, that turkey fryer sounds mighty good!!
     
  5. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    yes on pasturizing just get it up to 165 stir leave on another minute and your done. With colostrum heat to 136 and hold for 1 hr.
     
  6. ecftoggs

    ecftoggs New Member

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    Anita,
    Since I don't have a heated milk room in my barn I do all of my pasturizing with the big double pot method on my stove that Stacy described also but I have a digital thermometer from Pampered Chef that I wouldn't be without! :D I am able to set it and have an alarm go off when the milk reaches the right temperature which is important for me since I tend to wander off doing other things not staying focused on the task at hand. We even got a new remote grilling thermometer so now I can leave the probe in the milk and take the remote with me out to the barn and telling me what the milk temp is on the pot in the house. Having these tools make heating milk and colostrum EASY.
    Mary
     
  7. I put milk in a 2 gallon stainless steel pail set inside a large pot of water. It takes about 10-15 minutes per batch, I am doing 4 a day now.
    Becky
     
  8. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Even Walmart has the digital alarm thermometers. I have boiled over and forgotten more milk on the stove than I care to admit. I love my turkey fryer and thanks to Sara for tell me about it! Vicki
     
  9. Kalne

    Kalne New Member

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    What kind of thermometers are you all using? We get digital ones from WM but go through a couple each year. They just don't seem to last long for us. *shrug*
     
  10. ecftoggs

    ecftoggs New Member

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    I have probably been usuing this same digital thermometer/timer for 5 years. I got it from a Pampered Chef party and I think they run about $40. It uses one AAA battery and this lasts forever also. I try to shut it off between batches of milk but a lot of the times it stays on all day. I usually end up doing 5-6 batches of milk/day when we get going so it does work hard. My probe is attached to the thermometer with this one and can't imagine doing all my milk and cheese making without this handy little thing. Finally something you can get at these parties you can write off as a "farm expense".
    Mary
     
  11. Would colostrum be able to be done in a deep fryer? I have thought of using the crock pot idea but haven't found a crock that has actual degrees, just high and low. I do have a deep fryer that I haven't been using and it sure would be alot easier than the stove top method.
     
  12. mill-valley

    mill-valley New Member

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    Just a note on the home pastuerizers...I have one I bought on Ebay. Does 1 gallon at a time, I believe it holds it at a lower temp for longer period of time (like 155 for 30 min or so). Thing takes forEVER. Like at least an hour to two hours depending on the temp of the milk. It is convenient in that you can turn it on, do something else, and the buzzer goes off when it's done. But with limited time it takes way too long to do 4-5 gal/day. I've been using a stock pot and candy thermometer...much quicker and can do 2 gallons at a time. However, I'm looking into something easier as with the stovetop you have to sit there and stir the whole time.
     
  13. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    That is why these elec turkey fryers are so nice you can do at least 2 gal but haven't ckd mine out yet for sure on max amounts it works like a dbl boiler but is thermostat controled.
    4fromgoat it all depends on if your deep fryer is thermo controled and goes down far enough in temp. try it with water before ruining your colostrum.
     
  14. Anita Martin

    Anita Martin Senior Member

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    I tried my deep fryer yesterday. It holds 6 quarts and did a GREAT job. I thought I was working hard, but after reading how often some of you have to pasturize milk a day, I guess I'm getting off pretty easy! Thanks for all the great suggestions. Can't wait to find one of those nifty thermometers. I just have a cheapo one.
    Anita
     
  15. informative

    informative New Member

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  16. MF-Alpines

    MF-Alpines New Member

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    I think it would work, you'd just have to test it out beforehand to know what temp to set it at to get the milk to the proper temp.
     
  17. swgoats

    swgoats New Member

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    I'm sure glad you pulled this up cause I didn't know about digital alarm thermometers! Ugh, all the cleaning my stove has gotten this year from boiling my milk over!
     
  18. hsmomof4

    hsmomof4 New Member

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    I was going to say that the apparently "approved" technique for pasteurizing milk around here seems to be to put the milk on the stove and then go off to do some other things while I wait, forget that it's there, and boil the milk over. I'm pretty sure that the times that I didn't boil the milk over are fewer than the times when I did.
     
  19. swgoats

    swgoats New Member

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    Me too. I don't think mine heats to 165 - it's one 160 and won't budge, then I turn around and it's over 170 and boiling over.
     
  20. tlcnubians

    tlcnubians New Member

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    For heat-treating colostrum, I've found the easiest method is to pre-heat several thermoses with hot water then pour the water out and your properly heated colostrum in and let them sit for an hour. Be sure to check the temp on the colostrum at the end of the hour to be sure it's still 135 degrees. For pasteurizing milk, I just use the double pot method.