Old bones?

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Dusty, Apr 4, 2008.

  1. Dusty

    Dusty Member

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    I have noticed that my 4 does have a clicking sound coming from their legs when they walk. I don't know how old these goats are, but they are all raising health kids. Is this normal or a sign of poor nutrition? They are on pasture with a little alfalfa hay and a complete pellet. I just started giving them purina loose mineral and they seem to like it. The kids are eating a little of it too.
     
  2. Rose

    Rose New Member

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    Mine do that, too. :laughcry
     

  3. andiplus5

    andiplus5 New Member

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    Mine do that too! ;)
    Andi
     
  4. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    I think it is mostly conformation. Does who carry weight over their knees or who are winged at the shoulders. This puts wear and tear on the joints that make them pop like this. I am sure there could be a nutritonal aspect of this but then you would see this in all your goats once on your management for awhile. Unless it was like kids you raised on not enough calcium (weaned early or weaned onto grain instead of a good source of calcium like alfalfa). Vicki
     
  5. Pairaka

    Pairaka New Member

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    Delphine, my 2yo FF who just kidded this past Feb, has really clicky knees. At first I thought it was a stick or a piece of gravel caught between her toes clicking on the concrete, but it wasn't. It's her knees. In my case, it's probably a nutritional thing, like Vicki said. She was kept on her dam until she decided it was time to wean her, but I was feeding them a lot of grain at the time. Please...I didn't know any better at the time. They did have free choice hay.

    I have only one other with creaky knees is Lenore and she's, oh... 8. But she has bad feet :( She came that way. When I got her, it looked as if she hadn't had her feet trimmed in months. More than months. I was talking to the vet and she said that she (Lenore) walks like she foundered at one time, which makes sense, because both she and Annabelle (who I bought with Lenore; Lenore is Annabelle's great-aunt) have a problem with their inner toes growing faster than their outer toes.

    Anyway, off the subject. :)
     
  6. buckrun

    buckrun New Member

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    What is the connection between uneven toe growth and founder?
    What is the difference in how Lenore walks?

    Lee
     
  7. Pairaka

    Pairaka New Member

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    I'm guessing that the uneven toe growth is due to the way they walk. Their hooves grow fast and unevenly, so they walk with their their feet "turned in" which exacerbates the problem, so one toe gets worn down unevenly and because they grow unevenly due to past problemw with the founder, they walk funny... See the cycle? I keep them trimmed as much as I can, and I wish I knew more about correcting foot problems through trimming, but I'm just not sure how far I can go. Plus, it is hard to trim the longer one back enough so they can walk evenly without making them lame. What's really weird in all this is that both outer toes are enlarged and the inner toes are smaller than the outer ones.

    Both Lenore and Annabelle sort of...waddle. It's really bad in their front feet, which only makes sense since they carry most of their weight on their front feet. A got with normal feet with sort of strike out with their front hooves directly ahead. Both Lenore and Annabelle will bring their front feet around to the side, with makes sense because they're bearing their weight on their outer toes, sometimes literally; occasionally their outer toes will grow under the inner toe.

    Both these cases seem to be extremes. Both of them had these problems when we bought them from the woman who had purchased them from the original breeder under an verbal contract to purchase $XXXX worth of goats from her only to find that some of them were Americans. She took them because she didn't want to break a verbal contract, but she also didn't want Americans in her herd. I don't believe she (the purchaser) bothered to trim their feet while they were in her care; not out of maliciousness, but simply out of benign neglect. She is one of the people that up until recently milked and offered raw milk (both cow and goat) milk for sale and was highly publicized for doing so and was actually raided by state authorities a couple of times, so she had a very large herd (and other things besides the goats). But when they arrived on our property, both goats' feet were a mess and I (armed only with a pair of trimmers and some "book-larnin'") had to set about figuring out how to fix them. Unfortunately, my feeding practices probably added to the problem.

    And that's probably a lot more than you wanted to know...
     
  8. buckrun

    buckrun New Member

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    Not at all- i think the more we share the more we learn.
    It is hard to ever get feet right that have been that overgrown.
    I had that experience with a large doe and i had to work her once a week for a year to get her flat on her feet.

    Thanks for that story bout those girls.
    Lee
     
  9. Our 8 year olds "click" some, I think in an old doe it is just creaky old joints :) :). I'd worry with a young doe though....
    Becky