Ok,Please advise me on the tetanus stuff

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Keeperofmany, Jun 28, 2008.

  1. Keeperofmany

    Keeperofmany New Member

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    I have 3 babies here now that are 17 days old and two of them are bucks and need to have their horns done. I know to now give them the tetanus antitoxin the same day they have their horns done,My question is do I give them more antitoxin and when do I start the tetanus toxoid. The little girl doesn't need her horns done yet, they are hardly there yet so when do i start her tetanus toxoid,or do I wait until after she has her horns done. I find this so confusing but I can't go through what I just went through again because of my stupidity. :down

    Wendy
     
  2. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Ok now this is what I do
    If dam of kids was vaccinated or boostered within 30 days of freshening then I do noting for the kids. and I follow Vicki's advice on when to give CD/T shot listed in goat 101 (birthing to breeding age) where she tells abt cocci meds /worming and vaccinations.
    at 45 days old give the first of a series of 3 shots of CD/T

    Now if the dam was not boostered then I give tetnus antitoxin when disbudding or the start of the cd/t shots. just know that it takes 14 days for the cd/t to kick in and that the tetanus antitoxin kicks in now but only lasts 10 days
     

  3. Keeperofmany

    Keeperofmany New Member

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    No the does have never had shots either. Can I give them a series of tetanus toxoid now. I can't get CD/T here at the vets. I can only get the tetanus toxoid and tetanus antitoxin. I have to get these little bucks done pronto.

    Wendy
     
  4. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Get what you need from the vet right now, but in the future use Jeffers. Get CD&T and get your herd vaccinated, you can do it at anytime. But mark ahead on the calander and give those second shots on 21 days, not 22, or 32, but 21. Then everyone is sealed for immunity and you can simply add another 2cc of CD&T to their prekidding routine of using Bo-se or trimming feet etc..about 3 weeks before they kid. Then you can keep the antitoxin in the fridge for emergencies. Tetanus antitoxin will eventually bite you in the butt with antiphalxsis, do not leave the vet without epi, just buy the one shot full, and keep it with you when you vaccinate or use pennicillin, some reactions are to the 3rd or 4th shots!

    I would antitoxin the kids in one side, and tetatus toxoid them in the other side. 10 days later redo the antitoxin. 21 days from the first shot redo the tetanus toxoid. Then get your CD&T in and revaccinate everyone, not kids you are selling or butchering. Vicki
     
  5. Keeperofmany

    Keeperofmany New Member

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    Thanks for the infomation. I will have to try to get the CD/T from one of the other companies besides Jeffers. I have called them 3 times in the past year to get them to send me a catalog and have been ignored. I don't like to order from a company that can't send me one.

    Wendy
     
  6. Patty13637

    Patty13637 New Member

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    I think I just read Jeffers cannot send vacc to Canada anymore.


    Patty
     
  7. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    You may have to just go with the tetanus that your vet has or ask him abt getting CD
    or CD/T or chose covexin 8 if they have it .
    I just looked and Valley Vet doesn't ship to Canada either.
     
  8. Keeperofmany

    Keeperofmany New Member

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    Ok. I have forund a place in Canada that the vets can order from. My vet needs to know what it is for and dosage. I looked at the site and it is called ( Vision CD/T )and comes in a 100 ml bottle. It says dosage is 2 ml and repeat in 3-4 weeks. Use entire contents when opened. So my question is this, do I give every goat 2 ml whatever their weight? And if so what do I do with the rest of the bottle,throw it away? I have 9 goats that need to be done. Do I order 2 bottles?

    Also, how does tetanus get transmitted? Can being around horses at someone elses place bring it to my place?

    Wendy
     
  9. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    right it is 2 ml /cc per goat and repeat in 21 days until you give it 3 times. but you can keep this bottle you don't have to throw it away.https://dairygoatinfo.com/index.php/topic,3112.0.html One bottle should do 9 goats as your only using a total of 54 ml/cc Tetanus is everywhere in the ground so they can pick it up.
    CD Will need to look it up for correct spelling etc.
     
  10. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS C&D BACTERIN-TOXOID
    X
    Also BAR-VAC CD/T, VISION CD/T with Spur and FERMACON CD/T combos include tetanus toxoid.
    Dose: use sheep dose from lable, usually 2ml SC (SQ) in the web of the elbow: the axilla, behind the armpit.
    Vaccination schedules to raise antibody concentration of Clostridium perfringens in ewes and lambs.
    If dams have not had prenatally, or status of the dam is not known, kids should be inoculated at birth and then once a month for three months.

    This is the immunization that prevents ENTEROTOXEMIA , the quick, no warning killer of young animals previously mentioned.
    Withdrawal - 21 days
    Goats do not respond well to the C&D vaccines, for that reason it is recommend they be vaccinated at least twice yearly.
    Note: about 10-15% of immunized animals do NOT build an active immunity to this disease, and MAY STILL GET IT.
    Some areas of the country need immunization against additional clostridials.

    From Vet Res Commun 1996;20(6):481-92
    Enterotoxaemia in goats.
    Uzal FA, Kelly WR - Department of Veterinary Pathology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Enterotoxaemia of sheep and goats occurs worldwide, but the condition in goats is poorly understood. The disease in goats is mostly caused by Clostridium perfringens type D, although the role of the toxins of this microorganism in the pathogenesis of the disease is not fully understood. The disease occurs in three forms, peracute, acute and chronic, the cardinal clinical sign of the acute and chronic forms being diarrhoea. The main biochemical alterations are hyperglycaemia and glycosuria, while at necropsy the disease is often characterized by haemorrhagic colitis. The typical histological changes observed in the brain of sheep with enterotoxaemia are not considered to be a common feature of enterotoxaemia in goats. Although the pathogenesis of caprine enterotoxaemia has not yet been properly defined, it is usually accepted that the presence of C. perfringens type D in the small bowel, together with a sudden change to a diet rich in carbohydrates, is the main predisposing factor for the disease. Vaccination seems to be poorly effective in preventing caprine enterotoxaemia, which might be due to the fact that the enteric form of the disease is partially independent of circulating C. perfringens toxin. More studies are needed on caprine enterotoxaemia, especially of its pathogenesis and immunity, in order to develop more efficient control measures for this disease. PMID: 8950829, UI: 97108215

    Vet Rec 1998 Oct 24;143(17):472-4
    Variability of serum antibody responses of goat kids to a commercial Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxoid vaccine.

    Uzal FA, Bodero DA, Kelly WR, Nielsen K. Division of Veterinary Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Sciences, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

    Twenty-nine Angora goats were used in a trial of a commercial enterotoxaemia (pulpy kidney disease) vaccine. The animals were allocated to four groups, of which three received an initial dose of vaccine, two also received a booster of the same vaccine either 28 or 42 days after the first vaccination, and the fourth remained as an unvaccinated control group. An indirect ELISA technique was used to measure the titres of Clostridium perfringens type D epsilon antitoxin in serum samples taken before vaccination and 17, 28, 42, 59, 70, 86, 98 and 128 days after vaccination. There was a wide range of antibody titres after vaccination, and the great majority of the vaccinated animals had titres below the protective level, arbitrarily set at 0.25 iu/ml, by day 98. PMID: 9829304, UI: 99046744


    More on local tissue reaction at the vaccine site:
    Enterotoxemia in the goat: the humoral response and local tissue reaction following vaccination with two different bacterin-toxoids. (Can J Comp Med - Blackwell TE, Butler DG, Bell JA)

    EXCERPT: Local tissue reactions at injection sites persisted for six months in 53% of the goats regardless of vaccine used or dosage administered.



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Injection site reactions and antibody responses in sheep and goats after the use of multivalent clostridial vaccines.
    Vet Rec 1987 May 2;120(1Cool:435-9
    Green DS, Green MJ, Hillyer MH, Morgan KL
    Uncertainty concerning the use, efficacy and possible adverse effects of clostridial vaccination in goats prompted a study of the injection site reactions and antibody responses in 40 goats and 40 sheep. The vaccines used were Covexin 8, Heptavac and Tasvax 8. In all the animals swellings averaging 2.5 cm in diameter were present at the injection site seven days after vaccination and were still apparent 28 days after vaccination. The injection site reactions could not be attributed to faulty vaccination technique because they did not occur in a control group injected with sterile water. By 14 days the reactions were significantly larger in sheep than in goats and by 28 days the reactions to Covexin 8 were larger than those to the other vaccines in sheep and goats. Serum antibody was present in all groups before vaccination and, with the exception of the goats vaccinated with Heptavac, increased 14 days after vaccination. The increase was greater in sheep than in goats. By 28 days antibody levels had declined in all but the sheep vaccinated with Heptavac in which a further increase occurred. At that time, the antibody levels in vaccinated sheep were still higher than in the unvaccinated sheep whereas the antibody levels in vaccinated goats were no longer different from those in the control goats. These results suggest that there is a difference between the vaccines used and between the responses of the two species and support the clinical observation that the protection afforded to goats by multivalent clostridial vaccines is poorer than that afforded to sheep.

    PMID: 2885963
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  11. Keeperofmany

    Keeperofmany New Member

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    Thank you,thank you,Thank you. :D

    Wendy
     
  12. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Wendy when you get time print off the Sannendoah info in Goat 101 for your vet.
     
  13. Keeperofmany

    Keeperofmany New Member

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    My vet has ordered the CD/T for me and it should be here on Friday or next Monday he says. I really have to dehorn my two bucklings tomorrow (Friday)and I have the antitoxin for them. Do I give it IM or Subq? Now the little girl has hardly a stub so she doesn't need to be done yet. Do I start her on the CD/T and forgo the Tetanus antitoxin since it should be 2 weeks until she will get hers done?

    I really hate asking all this but just want to make sure. My vet is being really good so far about what I want. Haven't met him face to face yet.

    Wendy