Oh no, lute questions

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Ashley, Sep 20, 2008.

  1. Ashley

    Ashley Active Member

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    OK, my cute little buckling busted a hole in the fence and was happily munching hay with my does this morning. :O I guess I underestimated him, I mean he's what, 80 lbs? He broke the 2 x 4 wire, it looks like someone cut it and bent the wires up...

    So, we have 3 does already bred by him, no biggie, then we have Glori, the lamancha I just got bred to a lamancha buck of Nancy's Thursday, looks like he got her, so I get to genetics test if we get any does I want to sell out of her, huh? What's involved in that, price?

    Then the real troubles, I have Toggy, unbred Toggenburg who has been in heat the last couple of days, and I didn't want bred until Dec, and of course to a lovely TOGGENBURG buck. And Toggy's baby, Maybelle, who is only 4 months old, and 66 lbs. Obviously too small.

    I have never luted a doe before. Can I wait until the 21 days so I can send in blood on them? Should I lute the baby anyway, in case there would be some error on her blood test, since hers is so critical, I think so.. Although she doesnt' have any signs of being bred, I don't really think she's cycled yet.

    I know if they get farther into pregnancy it is harder on them? So what is kind of the cut tof date?

    So now I will be getting some cattle panels and we will have a double fence on the doe side. I had planned to do something here (to prevent breeding to through the fence that is), but goodness, I figured it would be a worry when he got bigger (his side is downhill). :blush Stupid me. I guess I've just never had a buck before (except for that one that was very subdued). Even my stallion (soon to be gelding) doesn't bust the fence to get to the mares across the street. But goats are more ornery.
     
  2. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    I know if they get farther into pregnancy it is harder on them? So what is kind of the cut tof date?
    ...........................

    I would wait the 21 days if they come into heat they obviously weren't bred, and yes go to biotracking.com and send in blood on that date.

    The notion that it somehow is hard on the doe to abort is simply not true. You can't put human emotions into our livestock. You can abort in any stage of the pregnancy, with the kids small there is little labor and no start of udder, further along you have more labor and more udder formation, usually no milk until over 100 days bred if you abort. Abortions the first trimester are usually nothing more than a wet tail, you would have to be right there to see any passing of fetal material, certainly not kids and placenta.

    Go to ADGA.org and read on DNA testing. You simply contact ADGA, get the paperwork. Pull hair and if it were me I would pull hair now, keep it in a white envelope in the fridge...in fact I have hair pulled and stored of all my goats right now. Put them up on the milkstand, brush their hair between their toes really really well to clean it, then twirl it into a bunch..now hold the bunch with pliers and pull it out by the roots. Hold them up to the light and make sure you have alot of roots, slip them into and envelope with the goats name and ADGA id number. This way if something happens to the buck before kids are born you can still DNA both bucks. DNA is not about...OK if my buck isn't the father than it has to be the other buck, so you have to DNA both bucks...but once done they are always on file and never have to be done again...we are working on committee on getting this information onto our paperwork if you think this is a good idea than talk to your directors before convention. Imagine being able to look at your paperwork and know that your bucks sire is actually already DNA'd. It's cheaper to go through ADGA to DNA than it is to do it privately with the same lab.

    I start all my kids out in cattle panel pens because of this exact reason. You have now taught him that he can test and go through fences when he wants to, worse is if you teach him to jump. By putting them in cattle panel fences from day one until older 2 year olds, they never test fences or jump over. Vicki
     

  3. Ashley

    Ashley Active Member

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    Thanks for the help.

    I had read here that waiting longer is harder on the doe. I guess just because there is more labor..

    The fence is 6 ft tall, so no jumping. The other sides are cattle panels.
     
  4. Katarina

    Katarina New Member

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    "in fact I have hair pulled and stored of all my goats right now"

    This is SO smart. We had a kidding of questionable parentage and one of the potential bucks died prior to kidding. Thankfully the kids proved to be from the living buck, otherwise we'd have been out of luck with registering the kids.