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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Somethings i pick up on pretty quick the gentics however Im having a hard time, haven to read it several times so it sinks in but its great info thanks.


I have anouther question has anyone seen a goat with 1 blue and 1 brown eye? Is it even possible Ive seen horses and people like this why not goats?
 

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When I had Nigies, both my sires were blue eyed, and most of the does had brown. None of the kids who were born with blue eyes ever started out with brown, they were born with blue and stayed that way. One buck sired 100% blue eyed kids and the other sired 80% blue eyed kids out of my does.
 

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Actually, YES, I have seen a picture of a goat with one blue, one brown. I can't remember for the LIFE of me where it was but it was on a Texas fainter website. I remember thinking "Wow! Look at that." It's the only one I've ever seen.

ETA:

Not the same goat I saw, but there is an example of a goat with both: http://www.prairiewoodranch.com/blueeyes.html

VERY neat would love to have something like that.
 

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Just a little imput here nothing scientific :)
I had a blue eyed MM buck and with all his breedings I only got blue eye baby once when bred to a blue eyed MM doe I have a feeling that the cross breeding between ND and LM had something to do with it all because the buck and other blue eyed does plus this doe (other years) only produced normal Brown eyes So in my opinion it is all a crap shoot :biggrin
 

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Here is a post I wrote on FB once when I was a bit annoyed...LOL. It might not be perfect, as I based it off what I knew of ball python genetics, but it seems to be fairly solid.

Okay, this is something that's been bothering me for a while. A lot of people know some goats are born polled (hornless) and some are born with blue eyes. But SO many people don't quite understand how this works!

I'm going to use "X" to denote both polled and blue eyes, because they are a co-dominant trait, and interchangeable for the sake of this bit of a genetics lesson.

Let's say you have a doe who exhibits X and a buck who doesn't. You breed them.

Xx stands for the doe. This means she exhibits the trait (ie blue eyes). xx stands for the buck. He does not exhibit the trait.

If you breed Xx with xx, because it is a CO-DOMINANT trait, and not recessive, you stand to get:

50% Xx
50% xx

In clearer terms, each kid has half a chance of exhibiting the blue eyes. Each kid also has half a chance of having plain eyes.

Now, you breed a Xx with a Xx. Two blue eyed goats.

This means you get 100% blue eyes right?

Wrong!

Because this is a co-dominant trait, both goats most LIKELY carry the brown eyed/horned gene as well. This means you get:

50% Xx
25% XX
25% xx

But wait, what does this mean? There's three results.

Xx is obviously a blue eyed kid. xx is a brown eyed kid. So what is XX?

XX is a homozygous blue eyed kid. The homozygous means that it carries two copies of the blue eyed gene. This means if you breed a homozygous goat, all of its offspring will have blue eyes.

Now, I am not 100% certain homozygous blue eyed/polled goats exist. They should. Doesn't mean they do.

Confused yet? It's okay, it just takes some practice.

But let me get some things straight.

Your goat cannot CARRY the polled or blue eyed gene without exhibiting it. There is NO heterozygous for these traits, because they are co-dominant.

If you breed a blue eyed/polled goat to a blue eyed goat/polled goat, you can STILL get brown eyed/horned kids. You're more likely to get what you're seeking, but each kid still has that chance of the draw.

Hope this helps, and please forgive me. I've seen one too many comments about "carrying" such and such gene or "guaranteed to have such and such gene kids."



Oh - as a side note. I've never had a kid be born with brown eyes that turned blue. I work a lot with blue eyes, as they are popular in the pet trade. You KNOW when a kid is born with blue eyes, they are very bright. I HAVE had kids that were born with blue-ish eyes that faded to the normal golden brown.
We have a doeling that was born with blue eyes and we have ZERO blue eyed goats, she is solid white with no color anywhere. Her mom is alpine/nigerian cross and Her dad is a pure nigerian BOTH have hazel/brown eyes. The parents have had 1 set of doeling twins in 2020, a single buck in 2021 and this single doeling in 2022. NONE of the other full siblings had blue eyes even at birth. We're beyond confused at this little doeling. There was another kid (a buckling) that has lamacha mom but bred to same buck that had blue grey eyes at birth but they changed to greenish then brown pretty quickly. The doeling and buckling are only 4 days apart. There's no other buck that could have been bred as the rest are full lamancha.

I've heard and read there's a 25% chance if grandparents had blue eyes or that there could be blue flecks in one of parents eyes but I've not been able to identify and flecks :/
 
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