oberhasli's

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by chewie, Dec 9, 2008.

  1. chewie

    chewie New Member

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    was wondering if there are others who could shed some light. my 2 are mother and daughter, and the daughter was handled from day one, was as tame as could be but is now being a royal pain! some days she refuses to be caught at all, and both her and the mother are just 'flighty'. the saanens and nubs i have are these laid back, easy going gals that are so easy to handle and be around. they know the routine and are happy to do it. (when to go to be fed, where they are tied while eating etc.) if they get loose outside they are jsut as friendly to walk up to and follow me as well. not the obers?! they run and jump and just act as if they've not been worked with. the mother isn't UN tame, just not very relaxed. is this an ober thing or am i just 'lucky' ?
     
  2. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    I've never had any Obers, myself, but got to know a couple of them when I worked at a friend's dairy. I don't recall having any problems handling them, but they were used to being milked by a variety of people. Now that my friend is no longer running the dairy and does the bulk of milking herself, I notice that some of her Swiss breeds with the exception of the Saanens tend to be more skittish than her Nubians and La Manchas. If your Obers were dam raised goats, that could be why they're acting that way. One of my Nubian milkers who was dam raised tends to get skittish at times. Kathie
     

  3. chewie

    chewie New Member

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    the baby was dam raised, but handled very much. she was much calmer when younger, but the older she gets, the more high strung she gets. she can just be such a brat. the mother is much easier but yet still not as laid back as the saanens and nubs. hubby doesn't like them at all!

    question...are alpines similar in attitude? i have gotten that impression and not sure how solid it is. hubby thought i should get one of those, but i think i'm staying with my other 2 types, they seem to fit me best.

    thanks for the reply
     
  4. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    I think it has a lot to do with disposition. I've got obers that are just great and smart, a few that are a PITA, and a couple that could charm anyone. Same with Toggs. Saanens??? I must have the one's with the lowest IQ's in the breed! I deal with them by ignoring them (THEY HATE THAT) and LOTS OF PATIENCE!
    Kaye
     
  5. shawhee

    shawhee Member

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    Not sure on the Obers, but on the Alpines - total attention hounds! They would crash the gate to have me take them out - smother me while I was in the pen and want all the attention. Now that they are gone, my first two Lamanchas are adjusting, and learning to like the attention. All my other Lamanchas are already attention hounds.
     
  6. MiddleRiver

    MiddleRiver New Member

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    I agree with Shawna - at least with my alpines. They are like pirrannas ! lol ! They are never hard for me to catch, infact they can be kinda pesty if we are trying to build or do something in their pen lol ! Just last night i was bending down chipping the last of the ice out of the bucket with all my girls with their noses in the way and then all of a sudden bam, i feel four hooves on my back, one of my doelings is standing on me ! And she isn't little and cute anymore at 80-90 lbs ! She was actually one of my dam raised kids, her and her sister are sweet as can be, and i haven't noticed a big difference between my dam raised and bottle raised, they are just as friendly/nosey.

    Could just be i'm lucky. I have no experiance with obers. I love Nubians, but the few i've had before were so noisey, for no real reason - i like them to talk to you when you come around like my Alpines, but not to just sit and scream for the heck of it. I had one Saanen once and she was very sweet, bossy in the herd, but a doll with me-she was dam raised too.
     
  7. Tricia

    Tricia New Member

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    Chris -- Were your Oberhasli born into your herd or did you bring them in? Dominance order may have a bit to do with it.

    My Oberhasli are laid back but typical inquisitive caprine busybodies. Only time they're "difficult" (and it's really just the two and three year-olds) is during our vet's farm calls (and one of our linear appraisers)!
     
  8. Thermopkt

    Thermopkt New Member

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    My ober is my calmest goat. She was a little standoffish until she kidded, not bad though. Mostly just not very affectionate. Very affectionate after she kidded until I started to milk her (dam raised the kids this year). Then we went through 6 weeks of hell. I was about the shoot her. Then she suddenly calmed down and is my calmest, most affectionate goat. She's the only one the kid (mine) can milk as well. She gets up on the stand now and almost milks herself. She's only a med producer, but after all the work with her this spring and how well she turned out disposition wise, I'm never getting rid of her.
     
  9. ChristinaF.

    ChristinaF. Guest

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    Hi,
    I don't know about Oberhasli's, but I have 4 Alpines. Out of the four only one is skittish. The others are very tame and attention loving. When I go in they just come and lay their heads on me. Those three act very much like my Nubians except they are quieter.

    Christina
     
  10. chewie

    chewie New Member

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    all of my goats were brought in just within the last year, cept the ober's baby, which was born here. i do know that sometimes kate, the mother, would like some attention but knows she's not on the top of the pecking order so she is skittish, at any time someone may come butt her. i do try to give her attention when the others are elsewhere, but mostly she's for food and nothing more. she's not too skittish, but the doeling is such a PITA. just wound up and always looking for ways to be where she's not wanted. jsut wondered if obers tended towards more high strung nature.

    the doeling was played with extensively when little and was so sweet and so very tame--but since it gotten colder (we're out less) she has this attitude of not wanting to be caught at all. very frustrating! i gave this doeling, at birth, to my DD, so i don't see my getting rid of her anytime soon, but both DH and i are not impressed! the saanen and nub doelings that were totally untouched and wild as could be in may are now so calm and quiet, a pure joy to be around. just don't understand why the one who'd gotten the most attention is the worst brat. or maybe that's why?

    as for the mother, i'm waiting to see her production this year, she was only a FF and new too, so this year is really the first 'real' year. i'm very new at this myself, so this is my first year of breeding/kidding my own. just hope they're all bred!
     
  11. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    If you bred the Ober doeling, she should get tamer for you once she freshens, particularly if you pull the kids at birth. She'll think you're her baby because you're milking her. The kids will also be tamer as they will be bottle babies. Kathie
     
  12. cybercat

    cybercat New Member

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    Teenage stage. I do not know goats but in dogs and cats this is what happens and they do grow out of it. Those that get alot of attention as younglings will act up more it seems when hitting thier teens. Call it rebelion or no fear it is common but they do grow out of it. Just do not let her get away with any bad habits, correct those fast. No sense in developing patterns you can not live with in the future.
     
  13. sammyd

    sammyd New Member

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    One of our Obers is pretty friendly, the other is more stand-offish, but both are easy to handle.
    The Nubian and LaMancha are the attention hounds,
    The Saanens could care less but are pretty easy to catch and work with.