Newbie. Please, any would help would be appreciated

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Mike, Sep 5, 2008.

  1. Mike

    Mike Guest

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    I have 1 Boer, 2 Oberhasli, 2 Pigmy's. The Boer and 1 Oberhasli are losing hair on the tops of their backs. Also, there are alot of bumps and scaly skin in this area. Is their diet wrong? Could be, because I have absolutely no idea of what they should be eating. Hay, of course. But, how much alpha pellets and sweet feed should I be giving them? One of the Oberhasli we milk. They currently have about 1/2 an acre of very brushy terrain with an additional 1/2 acre planned for fencing.

    Any help would be great...
    thank you all in advance

    Mike and Kristy
     
  2. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Welcome to the forum!

    Have you used any wormers or liceoff products poured down their backs?

    Tell us the age and the sex of the rest of your goats. vicki
     

  3. Mike

    Mike Guest

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    The boer (male) is 5 months, 1 Oberhasli (female,both) is 2 yrs, the other is 2 months. The pigmy's (male and female) are couple months as well.
     
  4. Anita Martin

    Anita Martin Senior Member

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    Sounds like lice to me. They are sometimes VERY hard to see, but look really closely and I'll bet you can see themwalking around, and also the eggs attached to hairs. We used ivermectin to worm internally, which is supposed to get rid of lice, and we also used a lice dust too, plus body cliped all that long hair off. I never knew we had a problem till this spring when I was milking one of my girls and the sun hit her just right. She had always had roughened skin along her back, I just thought it was the way she looked. She had quite a few of those nasty critters. I treated the whole herd, even the babies although I could not see any on them. Since then, her skin has smoothed out beautifully and she's grown thicker hair in that area, plus she's not itchy anymore. Now we dust occasionally for prevention, and that plus the wormings have kept the herd clean. We also put down Diatomaceous Earth in the barn.
    Good luck
    Anita
     
  5. Mike

    Mike Guest

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    Thank you very much for your info, Anita. Could you explain to me their feeding requirments? How much of what? Thanks so much for your info.

    Mike
     
  6. Jo@LaudoDeumFarm

    [email protected] New Member

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    It sounds to me like you are new to goats? If so, I and tell you a couple of things that might help. Your goats need a high quality hay, or alfalfa pellets or a mix of both. They need a carbohydrate source which can be whole grains (oats, barley, corn , BOSS, ect) and they need a good mineral. There are lots of threads on minerals in the archives. Read them and it will give you a good idea about how to judge minerals.

    Bumps and scaly skin can be a parasite or it can be nutritional. When was the last time they were wormed? It's probably a good idea to kill two birds with one stone and treat for parasites and examine your feeding program. So, if these were my animals, I would treat them with ivermectin 1% in case it was lice or mange, give them a bath and clip them if their coats are nasty and make sure they had free choice access to their minerals.
    Do you give them free choice to the alfalfa pellets or do you only supplement their hay with it?

    I would also ditch the sweet feed and just give them plain oats, crimped barley and BOSS. The Boss helps with coat problems. Give us more details and we can help you better.
     
  7. Rose

    Rose New Member

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    BOSS = Black Oil Sunflower Seed.
     
  8. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    also you don't want to keep your bucks and does together. even at 2 mo old they can breed their moms sisters and the gal down the street:)
    Welcome to the wonderful world of goats.
     
  9. Mike

    Mike Guest

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    Okay. Thanks. Will make that change. I feed them fescue hay. Alfalfa pellets sometimes. They don't like it. it usually just sits there. The goat feed however....they tackle you when you come through the gate. explain to me if this is sweet feed or not. it comes medicated or regular. I just usually just get it regular. Brown pellets with some crushed corn mixed in. The hay I just keep the feeder full. alfalfa I keep in a small bucket but they usually avoid it. So basically you're saying everything should be "free choice"? Just make sure everything is available?

    Thank again guys.

    Kristy and Mike
     
  10. Ravens Haven

    Ravens Haven New Member

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    Welcome to the forum, Mike and Kristy.

    Autumn
     
  11. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    """""So basically you're saying everything should be "free choice"? """" Mike.


    NO

    Mike....there is a problem out there called "over eating disease". This is a killer problem that comes from eating too much grain (goat feeds, sweet feeds, etc.) or too much fresh greens (browse) . Goats will seldom over eat grass hay, or mineral supplements. Forms of alfalfa seem to be pretty safe too.

    Please take time to read a little in 101 here as much as possible. Lots of treatments in there, but lots of good management basics that will help keep you out of the treatment parts.

    Welcome to this forum,

    Whim



    https://dairygoatinfo.com/index.php/topic,30.0.html

    https://dairygoatinfo.com/index.php/topic,26.0.html
     
  12. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    Mike...I was also looking for some info on feeding fescue grasses.....seems I've lost it for now. But, as I recall....some fescue's pose some heath risk, and the fact that it is in hay form doesn't change it much.

    Now...with that said....most of my mixed grass hay has a little bit of fescue, johnson grass, and some other junk in it that has posed health risk to goats in the past, and I have never ran into all the listed problems that I see listed from time to time that are associated with these grasses. But, seldom does my hay contain over 10% of these less desirable plants, so I'm thinking that in small amounts the risk goes way down.

    Just something that you may look into when you get time.

    Whim
     
  13. Little Moon

    Little Moon New Member

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    Mike and Kristy welcome to the forum. You will love this place. There is a ton of very good information on here and more for the asking. I have had goats for 8 or more years now and have done a lot of things wrong and with the help of this forum I am learning how to improve my management.

    I want to ask you about your alfalfa pellets. What color are they? If they are kind of a grayish green and short and crumble easily you may want to find a new source. They have been made with poor quality hay and possibly even moldy hay. This might be why your goats don't want to eat them. Alfalfa pellets should be a deep rich green color and long. They should hold together well. Think of a dark green crayon minus the wrapper.

    I can't tell you about fescue grass hay. I can tell you that a high quality alfalfa hay makes a huge difference in the condition of goats. A good alfalfa & grass mix is also very good - especially when supplemented with good a. pellets.

    As for minerals, there have been numerous threads recently about different brands. I am not sure what is available in your area, but I use Right Now Onyx by Cargill with good results. I have not had very good luck with mineral blocks for them to lick. They lick them, but I can't tell a difference in their condition. I also mix baking soda right into my minerals along with kelp.

    Go slowly when making feed changes. Goats tent to LOVE new stuff and will over indulge. Just give them very controlled portions at first and gradually work up to the amount they need.

    Good luck and again welcome to the forum.

    Anne
     
  14. Theresa

    Theresa New Member

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    Also, they might not be eatting the alfalfa because of the sweet feed. If the feed has molasses, then they perfer that to anything. Kind of like asking a child if he wants candy or vegtables. So read the lable and if it has molasses in it then that is probable why they are not eatting the alfalfa. You might want to try a different feed. I use to use a feed like that but switched and the girls are alot healthier. Now my babies still get a medicated feed, until they 100 days pregnant then they are slowly switched to what they will get on the milk stand, which is an all grain for horses.

    And I am not sure about your hay. Mine usually get coastal or whatever the horse folks around me are using. That way I know that it is good quality.

    Hope you are enjoying your goats.
    Theresa
     
  15. Jo@LaudoDeumFarm

    [email protected] New Member

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    Grain products should not ever be fed free choice. I was talking about hay, and alfalfa pellets. Whim's cautions about the fescue hay are important, and I think you may need to switch to grass/alfalfa type if you can. Or what other hays dairy folks use in your area. Goats often need to be trained to eat alfalfa pellets and it can take some time for them to eat them willingly. We had to mix them with their grain ration for a long time in order to teach them to eat the pellets. It's o.k. to leave the pelllets or hays out for the goats to eat during the day, but they will waste some.

    The plain pelleted type feeds are o.k. if you don't mind not knowing what they are eating. Otherwise whole grains are best. Make any feeds changes slowly so they will avoid rumen problems.

    What you can do is start mixing some of the pellets in with the grain and over time increase the pellets as they learn to eat them. Start by giving them the mixed alfalfa pellets/grain on the milkstand or twice a day. Not free choice. Once they learn to eat them, if you put them out in a long trough they will hurry over and gobble them up. If you don't have alfalfa hay available then training them to eat the pellets is going to be important for your dairy girls. They need the calcium and protein in the alfalfa in order to stay healthy through their pregnancies and lactations.

    Make sure they don't get too much grain if you are mixing it in with the pellets. Maybe use part of their daily ration. They will also be more likely to eat the pellets if they are hungry, so you can offer it first thing in the morning.

    Hope we haven't confused you.
     
  16. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Some fescue is toxic so kinda depends on if it is the new stuff they are planting now days of if this came from an old old estabilished field. If your goats are not milking and the bucks are not breeding then in my opinion they need nothing but alfalfa pellets and any grass hay and browse. Growing babies do need a medicated pellet to grow good to full potential.. Use a good wormer and worming methods with fecal checks etc. and also cocci prevention on the youngins.
    Welcome to the forum