New Treatment for CL

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by NPgoats, Sep 20, 2010.

  1. NPgoats

    NPgoats New Member

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    Here is some new information regarding the treatment of CL (Caseous Lymphodenitis).

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19405888

    The drug used was Tulathomycin/Draxxin. I hope to get more information to post/link soon.
    Linda
     
  2. Dana

    Dana New Member

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    I read the article. Too bad it doesn't have a new drug for preventing CL. I think there is a vaccine but heard it was iffy.
     

  3. hsmomof4

    hsmomof4 New Member

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    There is a vaccine. But since the blood test for CL just tests for antibodies, if you vaccinate, your animals will test positive, even if they aren't.
     
  4. MF-Alpines

    MF-Alpines New Member

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    I have read that, too. Do any of you actually vaccinate for CL? Would it be beneficial so that, in case your goats were exposed to it, at least they would not actually get it?
     
  5. Ashley

    Ashley New Member

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    Also I think CL has a lot of different strains, so you really need a vaccine for whatever strain you have.
     
  6. Cotton Eyed Does

    Cotton Eyed Does New Member

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    I visited with a boer lady one time way up in north texas. They had had CL in their herd in animals that were way too expensive to put down. Foundation stock they bought from Big time breeders. They were using these animals to upgrade their stock but trying to prevent CL outbreak throughout their young stock. They were working with A & M in creating a CL preventive vaccine. They created the vaccine according to the strain that was found on their farm. They used the actual puss from a CL abscess to create the vaccine. All of the animals that they vaccinated will test positive for CL from now on. The problem with this is you don't really know if they are testing positive because they were vaccinated or if they actually have CL.
     
  7. wheytogosaanens

    wheytogosaanens New Member

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    If you practice good biosecurity, you should be pretty safe from CL. One of the biggies to avoid is purchasing stock from a ranch that has CL. If you show, make sure you have space between your goats and other folks goats - and we avoid shows that don't check the animals over before allowing them onto the grounds. This helps avoid ringworm, pinkeye, etc.

    If you vaccinate your Dairy goats for CL, many people will not purchase your animals - blood test for CL will be positive. And since the vaccine is "iffy", folks figure that you wouldn't have vaccinated unless you have it or are co-mingling with herds that have it.

    The Boer herd in Texas is spending some serious coin to develop a vaccine for their farm. Too bad the "Big Time" breeders are so short sighted to allow CL and then pass it on to other breeders. They are just hurting the industry, not to mention sooner or later folks will stop purchasing their high dollar animals. GRRRR
     
  8. Squires

    Squires New Member

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    Here is a possibility -- if they vaccinate against it and can prevent it from spreading within their herd on infected ground, so that they have no more abcesses, they MIGHT be able to move their stock to fresh ground in the future, and in a few more generations they might be able to stop using the vaccine. As odd as this sounds, the Experimental Extension Farm in Canton, NY was sent some sheep with Orf, or soremouth, and in theory they would have been using vaccine on them for the rest of eternity. Instead, they put them out on large, open grasslands (they have a lot of it) 365 days a year, and moved them frequently, and the Orf died out in about 2-3 years.

    I used to worry about bringing home orf all the time, until the extension agent told me about their experience in Canton. I still don't want to bring it home, but it is reassuring that other people know how to manage it.

    In order to catch a disease, it has to be present. When all the scabs have fallen off, when all the animals are immune or vaccinated, and when they are on absolutely clean ground once again, there is the chance that they have escaped the disease. There is nothing left in the environment to recontaminate the herd, so they didn't have to vaccinate. I think they made a point of not bringing those animals inside their regular facilities for a couple of years until the disease was gone.

    The question is: are they going to be honest with their customers, or refrain from selling, while they sort out their own herds? There are ethical ways of doing this, and less ethical ways of doing this.
     
  9. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    How much property do you own Chris to be able to completely move a herd just because of soremouth? Vicki
     
  10. Cotton Eyed Does

    Cotton Eyed Does New Member

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    That is what they are trying to do. The herd where they bought their foundation stock couldn't care less whether they have CL in their herd or not, but these folks were trying to work on getting it cleared up so by the time they have their own lines established maybe they won't have to vaccinate any more as long as they are then able to keep a closed herd by not having to bring in infected stock.
     
  11. Cotton Eyed Does

    Cotton Eyed Does New Member

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    I purchased a doeling one time that had soremouth. They had an outbreak in a very popular Alpine herd that year. The owners let it run it's course. They cleaned and cleaned and disinfected until they were about ready to pull their hair out. They were honest with me and told me what was going on. I still chose to have the doeling flown to me. They waited until she had no scabs, no signs at all before they flew her. I had instructions from another Alpine friend of mine in California to bring her straight home from the airport, mix up a large tub of stout iodine water and dunk that doeling in it, scrub her down with it, turn her orange and then let her air dry and to keep her in isolation away from any other goats for at least another 3 weeks. This is what I did and everything was fine. It did not spread to anyone else here. AND... I had the prettiest orange doeling anybody ever saw. (HA HA)
     
  12. wheytogosaanens

    wheytogosaanens New Member

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    Yes, but Soremouth is just an unsightly inconvenience - and your animals are immune to soremouth afterward.... Very unlikely CL in just about every way.

    And yes, it is admirable that these TX folks are trying to handle the CL in an intelligent manner. Unfortunately it is also very expensive and if they had dairy goats on premises, they would lose a lot of potential customers. Heartbreaking and should have been unnecessary, if the original breeders had had some ethics.
     
  13. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Thanks for saying that Camille, somehow it is just so much more distasteful hearing that from JUST a dairy goat person :) Vicki