New Goats--Feeding Question

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Terri-Lynn, Nov 16, 2007.

  1. Terri-Lynn

    Terri-Lynn New Member

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    Our 2 new goats arrived tonight, we are excited :biggrin. The goats have been leading a "barn" life mainly eaing hay and grain. I have hay and grain available but want them to eat in our fenced areas as well. Our property has plenty of "browse" that we fenced in. I cut out all the cherry trees this fall but lots of alder, blackberry and wild rose remain. Do I have to only let them out gradually each day? Maybe give them lots of hay in the morning then let them out for a couple of hours.
    Also will they eat dead leaves from the ground, what if some cherry leaves blew in here from other areas I haven't fenced off and cut down yet. Am I being a worrier?
     
  2. BethW

    BethW New Member

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    I'm sure the goat gurus will chime in, but I'll weigh in, too :D

    First of all, congrats on your new goats! It's so exciting, isn't it?:biggrin If they're not used to browse, I'd let them fill up on hay each morning before I let them out, and then let them out for increasing lengths of time, just like you were thinking. They will definitely eat dried leaves off the ground, so I'd be very concerned if there's a chance of wilted cherry leaves drifting in from other areas.
     

  3. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Agree and for some reason goats tend to go for those dried leaves which some won't hurt but like anything too much will especially the cherry.
     
  4. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    I don't think that anything normally dead falling of a tree and blowing into the pasture is a problem. I think a limb falling down and going wilted is the problem. Vicki
     
  5. Kaye White

    Kaye White New Member

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    :yes :yeahthat
    It's wilted cherry leaves that give the problems everyone is concerned about.
    Kaye
     
  6. Terri-Lynn

    Terri-Lynn New Member

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    Thanks. We've had a few big wind storms and I knew I didn't have any cherry left where I fenced, but there is still lots for me to get rid of next year on the property, so I started worrying. Now that I have everything ready here and they have arrived, I don't need them kicking over on me.
     
  7. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    I agree with Vicki and Kaye......it's the wilted stage that you've got to watch out for the most. My forrester, which is also a life member in a couple goat registry's, says that wilted plumb and peach is just as toxic in that same wilted stage, and I know several who feed their goats this stuff when they prune their fruit trees. I'm thinking that Mr.Ingram told me that most hard pitted fruit trees carried the same type toxin.

    For the most part, and in my opinion, if you will feed your goats regularly and not starve them to death, they just won't get out there and fill up on a bunch of toxic stuff.

    Since becoming a member of this forum ( and I don't miss reading most post daily ), I've seen more goats sick or dead from eating to much grain, and not from eating toxic plants. Don't freak out if you see one take a bite of something that you think might be toxic. Goats are smart, and if given a choice, they won't eat much stuff like that. I would be more concerned with them getting in your feed drum accidentally......so lock it up tight .
     
  8. Another one is Apricot. We have apricot trees, just not around the goats area. When the leaves are all dried up we take the goats for a treat. Mind you we have other trees too, They only eat what they want which is never alot. Now if you take the pits out of the apricots (or large pitted fruit...cherries are to much of a bother) and dry them you can save them for goat treats. And watch that rhubarb. Highly toxic and goats like it.
     
  9. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels New Member

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    Yes, naturally ocurring wilt, like what happens in the fall when the leaves turn brown and fall, is not dangerous. Its when a branch falls or leaves are picked, those are the wilted leaves that are very toxic.