New doeling--seeking suggestions

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by stoneyheightsfarm, Sep 2, 2008.

  1. stoneyheightsfarm

    stoneyheightsfarm New Member

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    Hi All,

    I am going to bring a new doeling home this weekend. She was born in June and this will be her weaning and move all in one. The only other does I have are a set of twins--February babies. My concern is that she will be introduced alone and I hope my other girls don't beat up on her.

    I have an offer to borrow another doeling of about the same age as my new young one if I think it will help ease the transition. Thoughts? Suggestions?? Thanks!
     
  2. Patty13637

    Patty13637 New Member

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    First off bad idea to move and wean a doeling at once. Second bad idea to wean a doeling at 8 weeks. third bad idea to borrow another goat to keep her company . You can add disease and parasites to your herd.

    The doeling should continue on a bottle for at leat 16 weeks. worm her , do coccidia prevention , bo-se . I also redo there shots series.

    She should also be alone to make sure she does not bring sickness to your herd.


    Patty
     

  3. Ashley

    Ashley Active Member

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    This is Sept 2nd, it is possible the doe is 3 months if born first part of June.
     
  4. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    To add to Pattie's excellent post. Understand that kids who are fed rumensin feeds, who recieve Deccox M in their milk everyday do not build immunity to cocci. You can not put a new kid into a pen of homegrown kids who have saturated their pen with cocci and worms. Make a seperate place for her, nose contact isn't that big of a deal as long as she does not have a runny nose and you take care not to get her to hot bringing her home. Humidity and being in too small of an area will overgrow pasteurella in her nose. She then can't fight it, comes down with shipping fever then will pass this to your other kids.

    I also would not wean her, she is too young and it's super stressfull to wean. If she is a dam raised kid and you have no choice delay pick up until 12 weeks old and start her on corid orally day one of pickup. Worm her with Cyedctin and continue the corid for 5 days. Or use a sulfa. Fecal sample at least once on day 6....I fecal new stock right off, even though I am treating because I want to see what worm eggs she has, and what her cocci level is. During quaranteen I also pull blood for CAE. Vicki
     
  5. SherrieC

    SherrieC Active Member

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    You should pen her away, in quarenteen. and if you do just put her in with the twins they'll beat the snot out of her. Forget her eating her share of hay or grain. I'ld pen her seperate, not wean her yet. and pen her Closer to the other does after I'm sure she's not a carrier, but NOT in with them. Well I must confess I did put kids from both Vickie and Sara's within sneezing Germ distance of my herd, not in full quarenteen. but... I know MY herds health, and I really Trust Vickie and Sara's herd health. If you are that sure. It's ultimately your choice.
     
  6. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Totally agree with Vicki
     
  7. stoneyheightsfarm

    stoneyheightsfarm New Member

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    Going into this with my eyes wide open, knowing that some of this (move w/weaning, weaning early, etc.) is not ideal, but I made the agreement to do this long ago and before considering all aspects... I will honor my agreement, so need help in handling this the best way possible for all the goats concerned.

    She was born June 23rd and would come here the 5th or 6th, so not yet 3 months. Dam raised. Waiting is not an option the current owner wants--she has 2 does and then 2 kids. The other kid is getting picked up Saturday, and she'd prefer for them both to go at the same time. (The other kid is a buckling born a couple days later--does this make a difference?) I've told her that while I'd prefer to wait until 3 months, that this would be okay.

    When I brought home my 2 bucklings, the one was not much over 8 weeks; they were weaned at moving, and are doing fine now (after all the cocci treatments, deworming, and getting over that cold). I know this is far from ideal, but don't know if I have many other options. I did learn from this experience, though, that I definitely need to treat for cocci, worm, and do fecals! (I also learned that I need to seriously consider bottle-raising my own kids...) To my knowledge, only one CD/T was given at the disbudding, so I know I have to start over with shots from square one.

    A very good thing is that this doeling comes from a friend of mine whose only goats are does from the same breeding as my does, just a year earlier. She keeps them in her back yard and they don't go anywhere--were bred at the same place my goats come from, long before they arrived. If her doe has anything that would show up on a blood test, mine would, too. I have yet to get them all tested--wanted to wait until they're all here. (and another paycheck, to be honest! I'm too much of a newbie and a wimp to pull blood yet, so this will mean another vet visit)

    I know the concern about introducing new "stuff" if I borrow a doe, but thought the cost of treatment may be worth it if it will keep this girl from getting beat up? Please tell me what else I could be missing here, b/c in my igornance, I could easily be missing a lot besides parasites and colds. I've been given the impression that I'd be doing a favor to the friend who has offered the loan of her doeling, as I think she'd be a loner in her herd as well for a couple months while being weaned. If I don't borrow a doeling, and just keep mine in a separate pen, how long do you think it would take before I could put her in the main pen w/o getting the snot beat out of her? Am I just destined to live in the barn for a few months?? (If I wind up being pregnant, my husband might not find this a bad idea as peculiar as I can be!) If I get a dog house to put in the barn, would that help?

    I have a few extra goat panels and fence stakes, so I could make a separate pen. I'd have to rig up some feeders for it.... I haven't ventured into the showing world, so don't have all those portable do-dads!

    Oh yeah, speaking of dogs--I have 2 pyrs, and I don't think this doeling is used to dogs...

    Oh the messes us well-intentioned but ignorant folks can find ourselves in! Thanks for your help & advise!
     
  8. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    OK now since you are bound and determined to bring this doeling home then fix up a separate pen next to your other does so noses touch. then after a bit put one of the other does in with the new one and let them bond and become buddies. This is what I would do, after of course my quarantine period and cocci /worming etc. I probably wouldn't bring the loner in but if you really know the person and her goats then that is up to u.
     
  9. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    I'd pass on the 'deal'.

    Sara
     
  10. stoneyheightsfarm

    stoneyheightsfarm New Member

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    Thanks, Sondra! About how long would you take for the course of this adjustment? How long should new doeling stay in one pen? How long should new doeling and older doeling spend in that pen before putting them both in main pen? I'm guessing that there is no formula for this, and it will be something I'll have to use my discretion about. Anything I should be looking for to show readiness for a change? Also, should I put the less dominant or the more dominant of my older does in with this doeling in the transtionary period? Perhaps the one that had to be disbudded 3 times, just lost her last hornbud, and is less likely to butt?

    I'm thinking that the loaner coming, and then later going might cause more undue stress. It was an idea that was suggested to me since it is supposed to be better to introduce 2 rather than one(?), so thought I'd mull it over for a bit. Also, while it might benefit me, I think the loaner is a little younger and would be weaning even younger. Maybe not the best for her? Also, I know I'd treat her as if she were my own, and as vet happy as I seem to be, that could get mighty expensive for a doe that I won't be able to keep. My husband may balk at that one.

    Looks like we'll be building a pen in the evening!
     
  11. stoneyheightsfarm

    stoneyheightsfarm New Member

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    Sara--the deal of the loaner?
     
  12. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    So since she doesn't care if you take the loaner kid, will she let you take the dam of this doeling instead for another month or more? This way she can nurse her mom and the milkstand, which will tame down the kid tremendously and you can have some housemilk to play with.

    Bucklings are just semen storage tanks, no matter what you do to them, stunting them by not keeping them on milk long enough, or worms or cocci ruining them so they never grow to their potential...it doesn't change their semen. This doeling can not grow to her potential with this early weaning.

    If this is all you can get out of this gal, than pass on the companion, quaranteen the little one and make sure when you to stall her off it is on ultra clean ground and you start worming and cocci treatments from day 1. Vicki
     
  13. stoneyheightsfarm

    stoneyheightsfarm New Member

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    Okay, I didn't make clear that the companion would be from someone else entirely. The dam to the doeling could not come, because then her sister would be alone.

    Would you then recommend that I try to get the doeling on a bottle? I know that's next to impossible for a dam-raised baby, but I've heard of it being done... Of course, that was with a rescued fawn whose mama was killed, and the rescuer had to get down on all fours, placing the bottle between her legs... Am I ready to try that???
     
  14. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    yes try to get her on a bottle it won't be easy but if she is hungry enough it is possible
     
  15. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    So is she eating, not just picking at the feed? It become super important that you bring her exact feed and hay with you for the move. Sorry I just have a horrible feeling with all this. Why if she is keeping the sister can't she keep both for another 4 weeks? It makes no sense unless there is already a problem.

    But no I would not bring in yet another doeling from another farm...I thought you meant it was from the same farm. Vicki
     
  16. stoneyheightsfarm

    stoneyheightsfarm New Member

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    Well, I just fumble it all up, don't I? :) Doeling's mama and the mama's sister will be the only ones there. Each had a baby. She'd like for both babies to go at the same time. I was the one who originally suggested this to her, as I hear it can be tough on a mama doe to lose her baby when other babies get to stay, particularly when they're all dam-raising. I thought I'd have another week or two, but the lady who is taking the cousin to my doeling is coming earlier than anticipated b/c she lives far away but plans on being in the area for the TN State Fair and doesn't want to have to make the trip twice.

    She is eating her hay and grain well. I have supplied the hay for her recently, so I'm certain that will be the same. I may have to pick up some of the grain she's on, but I think she's just using Co-Op stuff right now. I can get a bit of that and slowly switch her.
     
  17. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    You may be able to get the baby to take a bottle. I was able to get a couple of 3 1/2 month old doelings on the bottle when I sold their dam. I also got a 3 month old doeling I bought last year to take the bottle. In my case, I knew the kids were old enough to wean, but it actually makes them more people friendly when you do that. Have the breeder milk her dam and send some milk with her. Keep her on goat's milk or whole cow's milk if you do this. Replacer isn't good for her. Kathie
     
  18. stoneyheightsfarm

    stoneyheightsfarm New Member

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    How long would I keep her on a bottle? How often at this age, would I feed? 3 or 4 times a day?
     
  19. Bilrite Farms

    Bilrite Farms Guest

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    I would ask the person who currently has her to try offering the doeling some milk in a pan, now before she leaves. At this age, I think she might take to drinking out of a pan better than off a bottle with a rubber nipple on it and then you might have a chance to continue her on the milk if she will drink it. Just a thought.

    Trisha