New Doe Not Eating Right

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by WildflowerFarm, Aug 25, 2014.

  1. WildflowerFarm

    WildflowerFarm New Member

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    We just brought home a new milking doe, and because of a late-night situation etc., we did not adjust her feed gradually, but just switched from a bagged feed to our own barley/oats/BOSS mix. (The girls have free choice of alfalfa, mineral blend, kelp, baking soda, dolomite, and grass hay.) She never really has eaten our grain mix, (sometimes she eats better than others,) but today she seems to be worse. After giving her a bit of nutridrench she seemed to 'perk up' appetite-wise, but she just doesn't seem perfect. I'd really love to hear any suggestions! She's a great goat, and a super milker.
    Thank You!
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2014

  2. punchiepal

    punchiepal Member

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    Any change can upset a goat.
    Besides a feed change she has a new home and new herdmates.
    We quarantine all new-comers for at least 30 days, usually longer, so we can watch for sickness, worming, feed changes, etc. Since it sounds like this has been a bit of time I would consider acidosis and treat her that way and basically try to start her over with your feeding system.
     
  3. farmer_to_be_037

    farmer_to_be_037 New Member

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    I would try probios. It promotes a healthy appetite whether they are stressed from being brought home or they just aren't eating right. I've read somewhere that it's a good thing to give in small doses for the first week or so when you bring them home.


    Owner to-be of two Nigerian Dwarf goats. (1 wether, 1 doeling)
    Harvard, Illinois
     
  4. farmer_to_be_037

    farmer_to_be_037 New Member

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    It's also all natural so you don't need to worry about it soiling your milk.


    Owner to-be of two Nigerian Dwarf goats. (1 wether, 1 doeling)
    Harvard, Illinois
     
  5. WildflowerFarm

    WildflowerFarm New Member

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    Dahlia, (our problem goat,) has been here for about a month now. She has been a huge producer, (she is a 3* milker!), was giving about 10-12 pounds of milk per day, but this morning she was way down. We gave her a shot of B complex to boost her appetite last night, and then she seemsd hungrier, but this morning she seems maybe even worse. She doesn't want to make the jump up to the milk stand. Jennifer, how do you treat acidosis? Would anyone suspect hypocalcimia? We lost a pregnant doe and her kids to that, so we are jumpy about it. We gave Dahlia some calcium supplement, (for humans,) this morning; should that help her? What else can I do? She will not eat probios:(
     
  6. WildflowerFarm

    WildflowerFarm New Member

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    Another thing; her milk seems to be weird. I am going to check her for mastitis at milking tonight. Her temp is normal: 103.1 yesterday morning, and 102.5 today. Any more thoughts? I'm quite troubled about her!
     
  7. Ashley

    Ashley Active Member

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    Has she been wormed? What with?

    It's very important to keep diet as stable as possible, especially for a doe in milk or pregnant. It's very hard to switch around or add something new suddenly. And if they get off feed like this, you will need to add back feed slowly. For a milker, beet pulp can help fill the calorie gap until they are back on their grain, without causing the digestive upset the grain would.
     
  8. Ashley

    Ashley Active Member

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    For possible acidosis, give her a tablespoon or two of baking soda, just mix with with some water and drench her with it. Unless you see her eating the baking soda that is available to her.

    Check her eyelids.
     
  9. WildflowerFarm

    WildflowerFarm New Member

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    Thank you so much, Ashley! She would have been wormed with Cydectin or Valbazen at her previous home. She is eating *some* baking soda. Thank you so much for the beet pulp suggestion! Would it be alright to add that suddenly when she's never had it before? Do your girls like it, or do you have to make them eat it? What about fresh beets; (we have a garden full:) How much would you give her? Does it give them enough protein to continue milking well? Thank you!
     
  10. punchiepal

    punchiepal Member

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    What Ashley is saying is what I meant by starting all over.
    I would drench anyway with baking soda it won't hurt, offering alfalfa pellets if she is eating those now and her reg. alfalfa & grass hay. Whenever mine seem off like this they seem to go for tree branches (offer ours mulberry and willow) cut stinging nettle and let set about 24 hrs before offering (helps stomach upset), and believe it or not we have had a few go NUTS over oat straw. It can take a bit of work to get them back on the right track.

    Oh if it was valbazen you might want to get a fecal, as most times that is used on kids only.
     
  11. Ashley

    Ashley Active Member

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    I would get her wormed, she should have been wormed when she was moved. Check her eyelids for anemia. I'd worm with either moxidectin (cydectin or quest, 1 cc per 22 lbs for cattle pour on cydectin, 1 cc per 100 lbs for quest) or prohibit, OR you get a fecal to be sure if that's your issue. I'd say chances are very high she's wormy.

    The beet pulp won't provide much in the way of protein, it's too keep her from losing condition while you get her back on grain- calories. If she goes more than a day without eating much grain, you have to add it back slowly again. Mine like beet pulp, I feed the shreds which have molasses on them. As for beets from the garden, they are different, beet pulp is leftover from sugar beets. I don't know what nutrition the typical red garden beets have. A few cut up for snacks would not hurt but I wouldn't use them to replace your grain. The beet pulp is mostly just fiber, which is why it doesn't cause acidosis. But the bacteria in your goat's digestion will digest the fiber and turn them into fatty acids which will keep her from losing much weight if she is still milking but not eating her grain. Yes, in my experience, you can add a good portion of beet pulp without having to increase it slowly like grain. Some goats may be prone to choking on it, in that case you can rinse it with a little water, or even soak it which will help get fluids in her. Mine all eat it dry, though I do have one that will sometimes start to choke so she needs a little water on hers, but it doesn't take much. She's also prone to choking on grain though.
     
  12. WildflowerFarm

    WildflowerFarm New Member

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    Thank you so much for your helpful replies! I will check out worming her; why is that important when a goat in relocated? OK, stinging nettle; we have plenty of that! I will also see if we can find molasass-coated sugar beet pulp shreds. We do need to keep her weight on; she is skinny already!
     
  13. WildflowerFarm

    WildflowerFarm New Member

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    Oh, also, where do you buy beet pulp? Does a usual feed store or 'Tractor Supply' or 'Rural King' carry it?
     
  14. farmer_to_be_037

    farmer_to_be_037 New Member

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    Both of those stores carry shredded beet pulp or beet pulp pellets


    Owner to-be of two Nigerian Dwarf goats. (1 wether, 1 doeling)
    Harvard, Illinois
     
  15. Ashley

    Ashley Active Member

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    Goats are very susceptible to parasites. Its' the #1 killer of goats/cause of poor doing goats. All goats have parasites in their system. When goats secrete stress hormones (being moved is a huge stressor) this stimulates the parasites in their system to bloom. At the same time, it reduces their immune function. So we want to counteract this when a goat is stressed- being moved, kidding, sickness etc. These are times to be on top of parasite issues as they can kill pretty quickly.
     
  16. WildflowerFarm

    WildflowerFarm New Member

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    Thank you Ashley; we'll worm her. Mastitis shouldn't make her act this way, should it? She is eating all her feed except hay and barley/oats, just not much of any of it. She seems perkier than last night. When I take her for a "tree tasting walk," then she eats a lot of leaves, and when I put her back in the pen, her appetite seems increased:?
     
  17. Ashley

    Ashley Active Member

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    With true mastitis, they are sick, so yes, it can. Check her temp. In my herd, when a goat acts like that, still eating but picky about her grain, it's almost always been worms.
     
  18. WildflowerFarm

    WildflowerFarm New Member

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    Her temperature has been normal, and she tested negative for mastitis today. My sister is giving her the wormer right now; we pray that it will clear out the problem! Still watching her...
     
  19. WildflowerFarm

    WildflowerFarm New Member

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    Praise the Lord! This morning Dahlia jumped on the milk stand, (she hasn't done that for days,) and then she ate some of her grain, and some hay! That is wonderful compared to what she has been doing! Could the wormer have acted so quickly? or did it finally turn itself around? Still watching, but whatever it is, we're glad! :biggrin :thankyou