Milking room advice needed

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by stacy adams, May 5, 2008.

  1. stacy adams

    stacy adams New Member

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    DH got a deal on a used barn, 16 X 32. We're going to use this as our milking barn, but it has a wood floor. We're wanting to be Grade-A compliant (still don't know if we'll go for licensing) so I'm trying to figure out what I can do to the floor to make it so, without riping it up to set it on concrete. I was thinking linoleum, but figured that might be slippery for the goats.. any Ideas?
     
  2. Shykid Acres

    Shykid Acres Guest

    Linoleum is an interesting idea. Some are slippery than others. Perhaps you could find one that works for you. I don't know anything about Grade-A compliance standards.
     

  3. Patty13637

    Patty13637 New Member

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    They sell tile that is not smooth almost like a sandy texture on the top. Or you can lay a 1/2 covering of cement over the boards ???

    Patty
     
  4. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    I have linolium on my little new milk room but don't think it will be passed for grade A status.
    only slippery if wet. see abt putting some of that hardyboard ? cement based stuff or do an epoxy seal like you see on wood furniture in bars. can't remember the name right now. but will think of it and tell you. If you don't have something that can be washed down with a drain etc according to state license rules you have to lime and sweep I think it was.
     
  5. stacy adams

    stacy adams New Member

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    Patty, I would worry about the heaviness of the concrete, but that may be an option..
    Sondra, I love that idea, and thinking it might be fairly easy to do. Just wondering if it would pass.. :/
     
  6. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Call up whoever would be your inspector in your area and talk it over with them. No use spending any money on doing something to the wood you will have to rip out in the future. Farmtech.com there are tons of catalogs out there that are made for commercial farmers with every kind of surfacing material you can think of, and most are cheaper to buy direct and pay shipping than buying local. I know the wall boards they have for hog farrowing is the way I would go on my walls, you can powerwash them.

    Congrats on the barn! Vicki
     
  7. Rose

    Rose New Member

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    I thought it HAD to be concrete in Texas. It has been a month since I read the regulations, however.
     
  8. Qvrfullmidwife

    Qvrfullmidwife New Member

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    there are several things in the regs that the local inspectors can apparently chose to overlook or put less emphasis on...
     
  9. Just a word of Warning...the local inspector now might over look it. But, will the new one in the future? Or if you get a Federal Survey? Its best to go with what the regs say, that way you can be grandfathered in. If the local guy says yes...MAKE FOR SURE that state board says yes. Its alot easier to built to code than to remodel to code.

    ken in MO
     
  10. stacy adams

    stacy adams New Member

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    The Texas Administrative Code says this..

    (A) have floors constructed of concrete or equally impervious material graded to drain.

    (ii) Gutters, floors, and feed troughs are constructed of good quality concrete or equally impervious material. Floors shall be easily cleaned (brushed surfaces permitted) and shall be graded to drain and maintained in good repair and free of excessive breaks or worn areas that may create pools.


    I was hoping to find some other impervious material that I could put on top of that wood. .
    I called Austin to ask them, and they gave me the number of the area inspector, who has yet to return my call.. he's probably thinking "Good grief, not another goat dairy!" :)
     
  11. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    impervious is in otherwords water /urine won't soak in and the liquid resin applied does this, I think.
     
  12. stacy adams

    stacy adams New Member

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    Finally talked to the inspector, and he said that glassboard (too slippery) would work as would tile. We may en up having a very fancy milkroom :laughcry
     
  13. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Stacy considering two of the local inspectors are long time goat folks themselves I don't think that is the attitude you will run into. There are lots of materials you can pour over or put down over wood to get where you want. Search around. And don't forget you can pour concrete dry, wet it in the forms, hoe in the water to the concrete to mix...in place. It's how all my concrete was done since a concrete truck couldn't get under the powerlines to the barn.

    Vicki
     
  14. Shereen

    Shereen New Member

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    We're in the process of setting up our cheese facility and am currently milking in our new parlor. You are going to want a floor drain. We went with a long rectangular floor drain that we can sgueegee right into. We have the brush finish- BIG BIG mistake, it's so hard to sweep and doesn't come as clean as a smooth finish. I worked at a commercial dairy in VT and used to fall on the ice everyother morning in the winter. So I thought the brush finish would eliminate that, better idea to just heat the milk parlor than deal with the brush finish. DUH!
     
  15. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Liquid resin is what I was thinking of Stacy.
     
  16. stacy adams

    stacy adams New Member

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    Yea, like shalack (sp?) Now, why isn't that stuff impervious? :/
     
  17. J-Basqo

    J-Basqo New Member

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    I dont know anything about milk rooms or codes at this point but was just reading and had a thought.

    What about the "Paint on Truck-bed Liner" stuff?? It is think vinyl (*I think* or something similar) but has a little bid of texture and would be tough and washable.. Just a though!
    Patina
     
  18. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    yes Stacy the liquid resin is impervious but make sure you have a drain in place. Truck bed liner would work also but think it is a spray on system they use.
     
  19. stacy adams

    stacy adams New Member

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    Yea, we're working details around the drain.. though, how do you grade a floor to drain if the floors already attached? would you just slope the building a tad?
    I really like the liquid resin idea. I used to work in bars with resinated wood floors and don't recall ever having a "slippage" issue, and it handled the traffic well. hmmmmm, things to ponder!
    We'll be getting it in next week and I'm very excited about it!
     
  20. Dusty

    Dusty Member

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    You could use concrete board over the wood floor. It is what you put behind shower stalls in a tile shower. You could shim the outer edges of the room floor to make it slope to the middle to put a drain. Once you have the boards down you float the seams with thinset and then put an epoxy paint over it, but mix some grit in it to avoid slipping.