Milk fever?

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by goatkid, Nov 15, 2008.

  1. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    Cozette is a six year old Nubian doe. I haven't had any health issues with her until the past couple days. She kidded in March and has been going down in production the past couple of months, which isn't too unusual for her. She was bred last month. Yesterday, I noticed she was slower to come to food, but wasn't overly concerned because the weather was wet. Today was nicer, but she didn't come out of her house when I fed until the other goats were eating and then she just nibbled. She still had some milk this morning, but wouldn't eat her grain. I noticed her back end quivering a bit on the milk stand. I took her temp and my thermometer read 95.5 I don't trust that thermometer, but gave her both Norcalciphos and thiamin. Tonite, I came home with a new thermometer. Temp was 99.5. I gave her another dose of both the calcium and thiamin and also probios. She ate a little grass hay and still wants to hang out with the herd. Would a goat this late in lactation and making little milk go into milk fever or is there something else I should be treating her for? She hasn't had any respiritory symptoms, nor is she scouring. Kathie
     
  2. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    """""Would a goat this late in lactation and making little milk go into milk fever....K"""""

    I'm pretty sure the answer here is YES. I think that any goat at any given time will go into "milk fever" if their calcium levels fall below a certain count.


    After having a successful bout with a slight case of hypocalcemia in a dry doe the first year I got started, I started feeding alfalfa (calcium rich) year around. As explained to me by my Vet, it can take a long while to bring calcium levels up in a goat through diet alone, and especially with dairy animals, a high calcium diet should be fed year around no matter what their status is. Well, at least with my herd, this high calcium (alfalfa) diet must be working because I haven't had one to bobble with "milk fever" since, and I'm going through my 3rd year now with dairy goats.
    I really don't even see how I stayed out of "milk fever" situations with those old brush goats that I had for years. I never fed them nothing but what they could browse up, and a little bit of some old cheap horse feed once a day.


    If I were you, I would be looking for some injectable cmpk today, and get enough to be able to give her injections for the next 3 or 4 days. With this doe not eating well, it will be hard to bring those calcium levels back up through her digestive system, and if she drops below a certain calcium level, you will have high risk of loosing this doe if you dont have an injection on hand to bring her out of it fast. IMO I would stop milking her too, and let that milk (calcium) start re-absorbing back into her body.

    WHIM
     

  3. Jo@LaudoDeumFarm

    [email protected] New Member

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    If all you have is that drench, try and give it more than twice a day. Also, consider de-worming her so she'll have less stress on her system. Have you done a search? There should be a lot of threads that can help.
     
  4. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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  5. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    I've been giving Norcalciphos, which is an injectable similar to CMPK. This is what my vet gives for milk fever. I also gave her a dose of oral CMPK. I didn't milk her last night and think I'll just let her dry up. I was planning to dry her up soon anyway. My does are fed alfalfa hay as their normal diet and I get it from a guy who also makes pellets with a minimum of 15% protein out of the same hay. When I went to feed this morning, she was picking fights with the herd queen. She still wasn't interested in the alfalfa, but did want some grass hay and is drinking water. I wanted to check this board before treating her so will go down and get a temp on her soon. Kathie
     
  6. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Ah yep now I remember abt the Norcalciphos If her temp is that low you best get her warmed up either inside or a sweat shirt/ blanket Lactated ringer may be in order if she isn't drinking and eating good.
     
  7. FRW

    FRW New Member

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    I would suggest electrolytes in the water and keep giving the calcium supplement for a few days.
    When was she dewormed last? I would have a fecal exam done also.
    How long has it been since she has been bred?
    I would also watch for any chance of a uterine infection just in case. With a uterine infection they will sometimes have a low grade temperature.
    If she comes back in heat you might have her cultured by your vet and also ask him about flushing her . Sometimes these infections will not show until the doe has been bred . As long as the cervix is closed and she is not in heat he cannot flush her to clean out the uterine infection.
    I think you are looking at a case of Milk Fever but watch her close the next few days and keep check on the temperature 3 times a day.
    Give her pro biotics also 2 times a day this will help increase her appetite.
    If you have Diamond V Yeast and Kelp offer this to her also it is a good source of vitamin B and other Minerals which will increase the appetite and also is a good source of antioxidants for them.
    Good Easy Mineral Mix!!
    4 parts minerals ,1 part Diamond V yeast , 1 Part Kelp, The yeast and the kelp keep the animals consuming the minerals at a higher rate .Which will help with Calcium Deficiencies etc.
    Unless you have allot of goats you might split a bag of each with someone . The Kelp and Diamond V yeast last so long I have to keep it in the freezer.I also raise birds and dogs and they get the Kelp and Diamond V Yeast 3 to 4 times a week in there special feed. Kelp alone has 29 mineral and vitamins in it.
     
  8. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    Cozette was bred on 10/16. She was wormed last spring. Since she has now been bred 30 days, it's safe to worm her, so I can do that. I need to get fecals from the goats and take therm over to my friend's. She has a good microscope, a parasite book and has taken training on what to look for. As for her temperature, I now think it's the brand of thermometer I'm using. I took her temp again this morning and it was 99.7. I then got temps on two other does who are acting,eating and milking normally. One was 99.4, the other 98.7. I know these two does aren't sick, so I gather Cozette's temp was subnormal yesterday morning and has now returned to normal. I'll need to find another brand of thermometer. I don't have any kelp and yeast. I may be able to find kelp in the health food store. The goats get Right Now Onyx mineral. Kathie
     
  9. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Well worm her she should have been wormed 30 days prior to breeding but worm her now.
     
  10. FRW

    FRW New Member

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    You should be able to get kelp and Diamond V yeast through your feed dealer. It comes in 50 lb bags. It will last you forever.That is why I have to keep it in the freezer.
    If her temp is normal and she is eating I would continue what you are doing.
    We worm here about every 90 days because we are in Southeast Texas and with the humidity and the moisture you have to worm that often to keep the levels low. We do worm while PG but we use Cydectin only.
    I hope she continues to do well.
     
  11. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    How are you taking the temp? Vicki
     
  12. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    Rectally, with a digital thermometer. In the past, this method has been pretty accurate. I even sent in to Caprine Supply or Hoeggers for a "veteranary" thermometer, and what I got was a digital thermometer labelled for human use. I'm not sure where that one is. The two I have now come from the drug store.
    As for Cozette, she's back to acting herself. She's been eating normally and interacting with the herd. Since she wasn't making much milk anyway, I've stopped milking her. Here in Montana, we don't worm as often as folks in the South do. Worming is done at kidding and then 10 days later. We also worm as fecals or general health indicate. My goats are mainly dry lot fed, so I think that's why I don't have as much of an issue with worms as folks who pasture their goats. I've talked to goat people I know around here about using Cydectin and they're a bit scared to try it. Kathie
     
  13. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    """" I've talked to goat people I know around here about using Cydectin and they're a bit scared to try it. Kathie """"

    That's a real shame. Some folks around here are the same way about it, and the one's that I have convince to chunk the safeguard, and go to cydectin pour on or Quest, have seen huge differences in the health and appearance of their animals.
    The sad part here is this.......they usually have to loose several animals to worms, and then come by here and ask me "how many goats did I loose to worms this year".....and of course I get to say none.

    I usually have to turn the question on them, and ask them if there's a difference between burrying a goat that has been killed by worms, or burrying a goat that has been killed by wormers. Ain't that hole just as deep ?

    Glad your goat is better,


    WHIM
     
  14. homeacremom

    homeacremom New Member

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    Same thing here. I got a secret chuckle this weekend. Someone who interacts with me about goats 1-2x a year stopped by and was telling me how wonderful cydectin is working and how I should try it, etc. Hmmm...I just uhhuhed my way through; that cydectin IS working well, then laughed later because I suggested cydectin over a year ago and got a testy reply. :) Don't we all love to be original and independent! LOL
     
  15. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Well even in the deap south worming with cydectin only and every 90 days may be asking for trouble without doing fecal checks people need to do FECAL CHECKS and know your wormers are working a flukeside usually is needed down here with the humidity and all at some point in the year. I worm prior to breeding/day of freshening and then run recal checks all the time to know what is working and not working. using a wormer just because is asking for trouble in the long run and you build resistance to the drug. So far thank the good lord my wormers are working.
     
  16. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Glad your goat is feeling better