Milk Fever, my first bad case, She's gone.

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Truly, May 22, 2008.

  1. Truly

    Truly New Member

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    Yesterday Roxy didn't eat her grain in the AM. I took her temp, 101. Last night I didn't milk her, just gave injectable CMPK, 48cc. Her temp was 102.1. She still did not eat her grain.

    This morning she didn't come out with all the other goats. I was afraid when I went to find her that she'd be dead. She wasn't. I was so relieved. Again she didn't eat grain, didn't milk her. Temp 101.9. Gave her another 48cc of injectable CMPK.

    I noticed that it was hard to get a "tent" on the skin leading me to believe she was dehydrated as well. I called the vet to see if they would allow me to get the lactated ringers. Yes. Good news.

    I called Sara who encouraged me to give the lactated ringers and continue with 30cc CMPK(injectable) every two hours. :thankyou Sara.

    I got the ringers and a couple shots of banimine at the vet.

    After finally getting her on the stand, I started the ringers, gave banamine and another 30cc CMPK. It had been two hours since the last dose.

    I got about 500cc of ringers in her. I figure I can do another 500cc with the next round of CMPK.

    When I took her off the stand she went to the hay feeder. It's just grass hay as I feed alfalfa pellets, so I added some alfalfa hay to the feeder. I waited to see if she'd eat. She looked like she wants to eat. I hope she will.

    SO, do I need to do anything else?
     
  2. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Re: Hypocalcemia, my first bad case

    maybe probios and BComplex but other than that keep up what your doing.
     

  3. Re: Hypocalcemia, my first bad case

    once you get her turned around... don't let up, thinking you are out of the woods.. watch her close & stay on top of it... I lost my beloved Charlie in Jan. I really, really thought we had it beat. She was improving by the minute. (we'd been fighting/treating ---everything you've been doing-- for a day & 1/2) her temp was back up. She was bright eyed, eating well. We were all exhausted. I didn't get up to check on her that night. Sure she would be fine. I will forever blame myself... by morning she had taken a turn for the worst. No matter what I did that day.. it wasn't ever enough. By early evening I knew the battle was over.. so did Charlie.. I released her soul... but I will forever beat myself up over the *what if's*...
    Sounds like you have it just about beat..just be watchful.
    susie, still missing Charlie..in the MO. Ozarks
     
  4. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Re: Hypocalcemia, my first bad case

    Once they have kidded it's Milk Fever, so I am going to change your post.

    Never ever never put a doe up on the milkstand who is in metobolic stress like this, you are lucky she didn't colpase and die from her jugular being pressed on with all her weight or breaking her neck.

    Treat her on the ground until she is 100%.

    Keep up with the nursing the relapse quickly.

    Be less generous with grain, does usually go into milk fever when they are getting too much grain too quickly when first fresh, or you are getting ready for a big show and you give them extra just because :) Ask me how i know! . Vicki
     
  5. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    Re: Hypocalcemia, my first bad case

    Lois: Injectable CMPK or Norcalciphos is the way to go. When I was dealing with hypocalcemia/milk fever, I did not use Banamine. I gave the calcium shots as well as B complex and Probios. I also gave oral propylene glycol when they weren't eating. It's also important to listen for rumen sounds. With Miracle, she turned around for the better after I stole some cud from another goat for her. I'll be saying some prayers for this little lady. She's special to me too. Keep us informed on how she's doing. Kathie
     
  6. Truly

    Truly New Member

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    Re: Milk Fever, my first bad case

    Additional info,

    She is about a month fresh. She is a second freshener.

    There has been a change in grain as they are getting more barley because it was cheaper than oats. Could that be a factor? They only get as much grain as they can eat while I'm milking. In the evening they get even less grain as I use the milking machine at night. No one else has shown any signs of distress.

    Her weight vs. milk output, she is my heaviest milker. She was milking over 4lbs per milking prior to this.

    I will give fortified B next trip out there and steal some cud.
     
  7. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    Re: Milk Fever, my first bad case

    If you've changed feed, just to be on the safe side, I'd give her some thiamin. I haven't heard of a slight change in grain causing MF, but I have seen goats go off feed before developing the neurological symptoms of polio. Whenever I have a goat go off feed, I like to cover all bases. Kathie
     
  8. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Re: Milk Fever, my first bad case

    Oats to barley is a big change, and buttery barley bet she eats alot more than oats. And we all know how much goats love anything different. Birdy was at least 8 weeks fresh when I gave her extra on the milkstand "as much as she wanted" because she needed one more leg, and I knew I could get it the next weekend. She went into milk fever and Sue Reith and Kaye saved her life...you will note she is retired now from showing still needing that one leg, so that was how stupid a thing I did to her.

    Make sure you are dealing with your mineral program and of course that you are giving her more calcium than the rest of the herd.

    The average goat in a herd or dairy can live off of the care given, when you have a special goat, one who milks more (and it can be butterfat, protein or milk amount) more kids, or is stressed) they fail on the average care. This is why most dairies kill of their best milkers, or call our 'show goats' in other words does who milk wonderful, hot house flowers, they can't live on the normal (usually subnormal) care that is give does who milk much less than they do.

    When you start improving your herd for production you have to start improving your management as you go. Vicki
     
  9. Truly

    Truly New Member

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    Re: Milk Fever, my first bad case

    When I went out to give her next round of CMPK and lactated ringers last night, she couldn't even get up. I took her temp, 95.1.

    We called two vets to verify that at that point there wasn't much could be done for her. Both vets said they could charge us a lot of money, but prolly couldn't save her.

    DH put her down for me. :down :sniffle

    I'm headed to the vets with her for a necropsy and a biopsy of the liver.
     
  10. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    Re: Milk Fever, my first bad case

    I am so sorry Truly. :down

    Sara
     
  11. KJFarm

    KJFarm Senior Member

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    Re: Milk Fever, my first bad case

    Lois, my heaviest milking Alpine went down with milk fever last Friday. She freshened in early March. The only thing I know of that set her off is the lush green grass that they are devouring. They are out grazing now and they have Alfalfa pellets and Sudan day available all day. Her temperature dropped down to 97 degrees and she trembling horribly, didn't want to stand up and when she did, she had a hard time holding up her back end. I gave her Banamine every 24 hours for the pain, and she got 30CC injections of CMPK every 2 hours around the clock for 2 days. She hated to see me coming, from being stuck so many times. Sunday, we are in church twice a day, so she missed some injections. When we got home Sunday night, she was really bad, and I didn't know if I could pull her through. My midday Monday, her temperature had finally climbed to 101 and she had just a slight trembling in her thigh. So I started going 4-6 hours on the CMPK. Tuesday morning she came in with nearly her normal amount of milk!! She has totally returned to normal now, but I am still watching her like a hawk. Had she not turned around on Monday, I was taking her to my vet for a slow drip of CMPK. She drank a lot of water, but didn't want to eat, so I was glad that she didn't dehydrate in the heat.
    So sorry you lost your doe, but unless you have a very knowledgeable goat vet, don't take their word for it, that there's is nothing more you can do. A lot of vets just don't have time for goats.
     
  12. Truly

    Truly New Member

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    Re: Milk Fever, my first bad case

    I just got back from the necropsy. He actually did it in the back of his pick up right while I was standing there. Her rumen was very impacted. Where there should have been food, liquid and gases, there was just food.

    Between the calcium imbalance, the addition of more barley and the temperature drop of about 50 degrees in the weather which led to reduced water consumption, she just couldn't pull thru. I was glad we ended her suffering when we did.

    Her intestines only had liquid. Her true stomach was almost all liquid.

    I had him get me a liver sample which I will send in for a biopsy.

    He said she looked real healthy. No worm problems or other things, just the rumen impaction. I was surprised at the layer of stomach fat. But the vet says that was just healthy.

    I am really pleased with him as a goat vet. He seems real knowledgable and is happy to give me the meds I request without having to see the animal.

    He did say that if we had brought her in he prolly would not of thought of rumen impaction. He was very surprised to see how much food and how little liquid and gases there were.

    Thank you all for the knowledge available on this site, and for your sympathies.
     
  13. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    My condolenses on the doe.

    Ok, folks...Luckily this year I've not had to deal with ketosis and milk fever in my own herd...but, I've changed a lot of things through pregancy.
    But, this is a warning...you are not immune to milk fever through the whole lacation. The optimal time for it to strike is between just fresh and until the does hit their peaks-3-4months into the lacation. think about it...the does continue to climb in production (more milk, more drain on the calcium in their systems) until they hit their peaks then they start gradually reducing milk output or they hold steady for several more months. The heavy producers HAVE to have some form of calcium supplement. Alfalfa hay, pellets, blah,blah,blah...and you need to be aware of these heavy producers EVERY DAY...twice a day...even watch them during the day, just make a mental note of their attitudes. If you follow some of the suggestions posted here, know your does, you can head off a bad case before it gets out of hand.

    Everyone of us has these type of producers in our herds and during the criticle times they need to be watched and know the early signs so you can intervene.

    Again, I am sorry you lost the doe and some can be saved, some just get so depleted it's impossible.
    :( Kaye
     
  14. Jennie

    Jennie New Member

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    so very sorry you lost her. :down
     
  15. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    OH Lois I am so sorry.
     
  16. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Sorry Lois.

    Continueing Kayes thought. Also bagging up does makes them a good milker holding way more milk than they are used tom either because you have missed milking or going to a show...you go to a show or finally make it home to milk because you were gone all day...and take all the milk out of the udder. She has no reserves and crashes on you. Always leave some milk in the udder when you have an overfull doe.

    You have to make all feed changes slowly. Vicki
     
  17. SherrieC

    SherrieC Active Member

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    Lois I'm so sorry you lost you doe. : (
     
  18. Kalne

    Kalne New Member

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    Truly, I'm so sorry you lost her.

    Vicki....trying to understand what you just posted, can you elaborate a little more on why you wouldn't want to milk all the way out?