Milk Based Soap Book

Discussion in 'Soap Making' started by VickiLynne, Jun 11, 2008.

  1. VickiLynne

    VickiLynne Member

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    I am going to be off work for a week and was going to try my hand at soapmaking. I have weaned all my kids and have excess milk. I have the book "Milk-Based Soaps" by Casey Makela. I have run some of the recipes through the calculator at thesage.com and I am totally confused. The recipes don't seem to "calculate". Am I not understanding or has anyone else had this experience? I have run the Walmart recipe through and it comes out.

    Thanks
    Vicki in NC
     
  2. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    The best beginner recipe is the Wal-Mart recipe. If you follow the directions it is foolproof. Start with that and when you feel comfortable start tweaking the recipe with different butters and oils (always running the recipe though a lye calculator).

    Sara
     

  3. VickiLynne

    VickiLynne Member

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    Thanks Sara, I will go with that.

    Vicki in NC
     
  4. Vicki, we use that book alot, and yes you will find that the liquid ratio is higher, use their amount of lye percentage or change the oils. Our soaps are good, still perfecting them. We have added hemp and grapeseed and have substituted 1 lb of the vege shortening with coconut oil. If you don't then your soaps will not have enough suds. I love our soaps now, wasn't to pleased the year before last and last years were better. The whole deal is to make sure the lye does not out percentage the liquids. And too much liquid will make an even softer soap.Any recipe in that book will be a soft soap because of the oils. Try the Wal-mart recipe first then try a basic recipe from the book. You will see what I mean. Soft soaps tend to take a little longer to cure is what we found out and they don't last as long, but they are good soaps. Sometimes adjusting the milk helps too, there have been instances where we would take out 8 oz of milk for certian recipes. Hope this helps. Tammy
     
  5. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    I think if you use the calculator and just put in your oils and butters that the book says then look at what the liquid says on the calculator you will have to adjust your liquids and not use what is in your book.
     
  6. yep, thats what we do. And because vege shortening is hard for the calculator you have to put it in as soybean oil. Tammy
     
  7. kidsngarden

    kidsngarden New Member

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  8. Belle

    Belle New Member

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    The soapmaking book didn't help me either. The Wal-Mart recipe is really easy and if you don't want to make that large of a batch then just cut it in half or whatever and run it through the lye calculator again.
     
  9. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Shea butter does not have the same sap value as veggy shortening (crisco). thesage.com hs the sap values for both. Vicki
     
  10. SherrieC

    SherrieC Active Member

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    I had this book I lost it somewhere, not that I'm looking I wasn't impressed with any of it.
     
  11. Anita Martin

    Anita Martin Senior Member

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    I have three soap making books, this one being one of them. My two soaps did not turn out all that great. Is it really necessary to pasturize and freeze and then thaw the goat milk before using? If so, that's fine, just would like another opinion. Thanks.
    Anita
     
  12. MRFBarbara

    MRFBarbara Guest

    I also don't care for that book, I tweak my own recipes with a soap calculator and what oils I have on hand, I like a good moisturizing soap that lathers well.. that is also creamy.. tweaking the walmart recipe is perfect for alot of people.. It isnot necessary to pasturize your milk when making soap.. the lye mixing, sapronification process is going to kill anything in it.. to the point where it is no longer raw milk, oils or whatever you put into it.. It is soap..
    occasionally i read on a forum where someone has soap mold and this one really stumps me, how can soap mold.. unless it is really superfatted, and then it would get rancid, with alot of food in it, maybe it could mold.. I have a few bars here that I made more than two years ago that is superfatted and soft, soft soft.. becasue of a diluted fragrance oil and while it did not get rancid, it never got cured to a good hard bar of soap so it melts away fast and I don't sell it just use it here, It hasn't turned rancid either..
    I have seen other soaps with alot of oatmeal on top, not ground up fine and in the soap, but on top that has molded becasue of moisture, but it was only the oatmeal on top that molded the soap itself did not.. Nope you do not have to pasturize your milk, now when making other body products, lotion etc.. you must be very careful and I always pasturize (twice)
    Barbara
     
  13. Earlier post I had Shea butter and meant Soybean oil, corrected that. Thank You Vicki for pointing it out. I still LOVE my soaps and strive to get better. I know they are not perfect but isn't that how you get better? Tammy
     
  14. VickiLynne

    VickiLynne Member

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    Thank you all for the advice and sorry for not getting back to you sooner, I don't have a computer at home and was away from work for a few days. But, while I was off, I made soap! I used the Wal-Mart Recipe and it turned out great! I was so excited! Now after doing it the first time, I don't feel so itimidated and want to make more. How long after soap is made can one use it? I have it curing on a rack right now.

    Thanks,
    Vicki in NC
     
  15. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    You can use it as soon as it is cutable. The saponifcation process is over, then comes the wicking out of the water as it cures. The soap will be soft, but all of us used our first soap too soon :) After about 3 weeks, can you really wait that long??? the soap will be hard and beautiful, the soap after 12 weeks will be perfect. Vicki
     
  16. VickiLynne

    VickiLynne Member

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    Vicki, you are right, I can hardly wait to use it! I keep checking on it like watching a pregnant doe! LOL!

    Vicki in NC
     
  17. Anita Martin

    Anita Martin Senior Member

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    Well, it looks like I'll have to rebatch or toss my big batch I made from the natural soap book. No goat milk used. It still looks like an oily blob. It's setting up, but is oily and gel-looking. I won't be able to do it until this weekend. Do I have that long? Right now it's sitting there gathering dust and cat hair...which are sticking to it like crazy. If I make the Walmart recipi, what can I replace the lard with? I bought a jug of lard, but it smells gross to me...we are vegetarian and the thought of smearing animal fat all over us does not appeal....anyway, is there something I can use in place of that, that will make a nice beginner bar? Thanks, Anita
     
  18. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Anita you are a mammal, not a vegetable :) The oils on your skin are very very similar to pig oils and it's why lard makes such a wonderful soap. Plus, if you took a bar of soap to a lab they would not be able to tell you if it contained lard or avacado oil...only the characterisitics of the oils and butters are left....creamy, lathery, moisturizing, drying etc... not the properties.

    But if you just can't do it :) Than go through the recipes section here and use one that Barb or someone else recommends. I don't tech the wallmart recipe for you to use the rest of your life, shoot a gal won't come to my class because she doesn't even want to learn it :) But it is fool proof, guarantee you, you won't have an oil mass of blob you can try to rebatch, but who knows whats wrong with it :) You can give the soap away for christmas gifts, but if you tried it you would love it! Plus learning with a fool proof recipe gives you your confidence back. Vicki
     
  19. kidsngarden

    kidsngarden New Member

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    Oh, Lard is so lovely in soap! And like Vicki said saponification does this wonderful thing - turning caustic lye and piggy fat into gorgeous creamy soap! :lol
     
  20. MRFBarbara

    MRFBarbara Guest

    I love love love my lard based soaps, and yep you are an animal too..So is good for your skin... In place of it, use crisco if you want, but run thru a soap calculator...I have found that using large amounts of crisco can cause seizing.. so be cautious and be ready to pour soap fast.. the beauty of the walmart recipe is that it does not sieze up, one of the reasons it is so perfect for beginners that have never made soap.
    and the soap comes out perfect..
    Barbara