management question...

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by chewie, Sep 15, 2008.

  1. chewie

    chewie New Member

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    my saanan doe (in my avatar) is getting fat, and has dropped production by great amts. she is down to 2 pints per milking?! i thought i read about dropped milk while breeding season, then it picks up again somewhat...is this what's going on? i hate doing chores for nothing, but i'd also hate keeping a huge doe for 5 months or more, til she freshens again. would love some thoughts on this, thanks.
     
  2. Rose

    Rose New Member

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    More alfalfa, less grain?
     

  3. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    When a doe's production goes down, she can gain weight if fed the same amount of grain as when she was milking heavier. If this were my doe, I'd keep milking her until she is three months bred, even though you're not getting alot of milk. I'd cut down on the grain she's getting. Some goats will also gain weight if free fed alfalfa pelllets. Kathie
     
  4. chewie

    chewie New Member

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    i have cut her grain now, but i was wondering if i should bother to milk her or let her dry up. thanks.
     
  5. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    keep milking her or she will just get fatter
     
  6. chewie

    chewie New Member

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    ugh, ok. seems somewhat silly when she give sooo little. i'm a bit disappointed about that too. she was a 'show goat', so i think i'm paying the price for that in so little in my pail.

    another question--there is just the most MOST vague possilbity she is bred for late sept., (the buck was just a tiny guy but i'd seen him jump on her and counted, would give me sept kids if it took). so if she was bred, would i need to do anything different at this late of date? would this be a reason for drying up? as in, drying up for now, getting ready to kid in a week or two? thanks
     
  7. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    You know, I really hate this type of statement. Show goats can and do milk! I have 'show does' and many are Top Ten Breed Leaders. The same goes for Tracy. Our does couldn't hold up during our hectic show season AND continue to milk a 305 lactation if they weren't excellent milkers.

    Sara
     
  8. wheytogosaanens

    wheytogosaanens New Member

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    :yeahthat

    If you think she is bred, then you'd better pull blood and express it to Biotracking to confirm. If she is bred (and due this month), then stop milking ASAP. Hopefully you will get colostrum in time for kidding. Also you need to Bo-SE and CDT 2 weeks prior to kidding, so not much of a window.

    Did you have a change in feed? Within the past 2 months, even? Change in feed (for the worse) can cause a doe to finally drop her production, no matter her genetics.

    Camille
     
  9. chewie

    chewie New Member

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    [/quote]

    You know, I really hate this type of statement. Show goats can and do milk! I have 'show does' and many are Top Ten Breed Leaders. The same goes for Tracy. Our does couldn't hold up during our hectic show season AND continue to milk a 305 lactation if they weren't excellent milkers.

    Sara
    [/quote]

    this is good to hear. i know horses more than goats, and there are some halter types that couldn't do a day's work, even just trails. good to know goats can do both! i never understood why a group/show would promote (by awarding top prizes) those who aren't the best at *what they are suppose to be used for!*, but on looks alone.

    as for the possiblity of being bred, i looked up exact dates, and she'd be kidding right now if so. if she is, its too late for anything, but i honestly do not think so. just fat and dry!

    i am wondering if i shouldn't switch some grain for some alf pellets on the stand? as for any feed changes, the only change that makes me wonder is the new crop of hay. its off the same place she has had all year tho, just new. it looks so good i consider cooking it for myself! but since she is heavy, and giving little, would the pellets instead of grain do me any good?
     
  10. mill-valley

    mill-valley New Member

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    Giving less grain reduces calories...which will help her stop gaining weight. I did the above with a 4 yr old doe who was getting fat on me...and it worked. She has even lost some of the jiggles and I can feel her hip bones again. She never went down in milk but she isn't a real great milker anyway. Being in heat can cause a decrease in milk production but it shouldn't last longer that a few days.
     
  11. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    First off....I agree with Sarah on her comments about show goats/milker's. Showing should be viewed as much more than just a beauty contest, or the prestige of winning.......it's about building a better "Dairy Goat" for generations to come.......hopefully by weeding out flaws from the generations of the past.


    On this doe that you have.........Personally, I would have to take in account her freshening date, and age, and how much feed it's taking to get those 2 pints.......but I would probably be looking to cut this gal's feed and dry her off/ get her bred/ visa-versa. The old saying around my parts "too much sugar for a dime" would be coming into play with me on this doe.

    ....and IMO, I have concerns about you possibly still milking a doe that could be over 100 days bred. I certainly hope that this is not routine management at your place....if it is, you are gonna be faced with many problems in the future when kidding time comes.

    Whim
     
  12. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    I would be sending in a pg test sample ASAP
     
  13. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels New Member

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    Very, very true. Unfortunately, many show breeders do not see it this way. Which is why it is so nice to find show breeders who breed for show *and* milk.
     
  14. chewie

    chewie New Member

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    i do not think she is bred, i shouldn't have even posted that at all since it was only a fleeting thought. i believe she is coming to heat now. and no, i wouldn't keep milking something that far along! i plan to do things 'by the book'.

    the heat cycle may be our drying cause, i just thought they went a little down, not alot down!
    i will have to cut her grain a bit more yet, she is holding alot of fat in her tail area, elbows, and neck.

    there seems to be very little around me who have goats that are nice looking and milking well. they seem to equate big bag (hanging or not) with lots of milk. and a friend is happy if they give much at all, long as they milk easy. maybe i'm being picky but i want looks, milk and easy handles. not much!
     
  15. mill-valley

    mill-valley New Member

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    That is NOT expecting too much. There are lots of them around...just takes some digging. Especially in the Saanen breed you should be able to find a decent milker without too much trouble.
     
  16. doublebowgoats

    doublebowgoats Active Member

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    I only have one "real" milker (LM) and when she is in heat her milk will drop by almost half for a day or two. Then she's back to business as usual.
     
  17. chewie

    chewie New Member

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    yup, after tonights' chores, ol daisy is in heat big time. the buck can't hardly leave her alone, but she's not quite ready for him, maybe in the morning.

    i have a couple more questions....would you all leave the buck in with her all night? or is breeding her by hand in the morning ok? to leave them all night i'd have to do some real switching around as i dont' want all the milkers bred at this time.

    and would switching this fatty to some alf pellets for on the stand be a good idea, to get some fat off her? while still giving her a 'treat' on stand. they otherwise have free choice alf. hay.
     
  18. Wendy Tinney

    Wendy Tinney New Member

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    Sorry, that I am not answering your questions, but I am so thankful to see this dramatic drop in milk production happened to others. One of my nubians drops down to almost nothing and then fills back up a few days later. The first time it happened I thought something was horribly wrong. Yet could not find anything wrong.

    Wendy
     
  19. If you are breeding for show you ought to be breeding for milk. If not, what's the point? A great show doe ought to have a great, easy to milk udder that isn't dragging the ground. I don't understand people who say they have a milking (production) line and a line bred for showing. Those show girls ought to be the best producers. This is the whole point of breeding great dairy goats for showing. The goal is to get a doe who is sound in body and who is a star milker.
     
  20. chewie

    chewie New Member

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    exactly!!! that is why i bought some that were from showing farms!! then i heard others say things about show goats, referring to they dont' milk well. huh? i didnt' get that. i thank you for saying so!