lumpy jaw

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by marytx, Mar 16, 2008.

  1. marytx

    marytx New Member

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    This morning I was admiring the udder on one of my young two year olds, then to my horror I noticed something else--a big lump on her left jaw. I felt it and it is firm.

    A couple of years ago I saw this in another goat and took her to the vet. Lumpy jaw, he said, and put her down. :down

    I believed from what I read that it could have been caused by something stickery getting stuck in her jaw. We, sadly, have a lot of stickery things in the field.

    Before I take this goat in, y'all please give me some advice. What would you do?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. KJFarm

    KJFarm Senior Member

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    Looks to be an abscess of some kind. Get her separated from your other goats, and it would be best to find a vet who would check it out. Preferably have it surgically removed and contents sent in for testing. If it is CL, it is very, very contagious, don't let it open up on it's own and spread the pus all over your place.
     

  3. Karen Bailey

    Karen Bailey New Member

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    From the position on the jaw it might be a tooth abscess or maybe a salivary cyst.
     
  4. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    and they will sometimes come up from pg hormones in the salivary gland and then disapear. So find a vet that will check it all. you can check for tooth but be very careful and use a pvc pipe in the mouth first before putting fingers in.
     
  5. Rose

    Rose New Member

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    I'm glad you found this forum, too! :D
     
  6. marytx

    marytx New Member

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    Thank you for the replies. I don't believe it is a salivary cyst because it if firm and not squishy.
    I am concerned because I only know of one livestock vet in the area, and last time he seemed scared of it and not interested in looking further into the matter. His advice was to take her to the sale barn or put her down. I figured if it was as bad a thing as he seemed to think, why would I take her to the sale barn, so we cut our losses and had her put down.

    I don't really want to stick my hand in there. I tried that the last time and got bit/cut. I guess I have to take her to the vet, and am wondering what I should say to him and suggest that he do.

    mary
     
  7. Nancy

    Nancy New Member

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    Has it been growing a while? Looks more like a salivary cyst. The vet can aspirate it and if it's clear fluid it is a cyst. My dd had a market wether last year that had a cyst and it looked just like it. He was cae & cl neg. and the vet aspirated it. The only bad thing because he did aspirate it it ended up getting larger. We still have him and it doesn't bother him. It is firm to the touch also. If it came on suddenly I would say check for infection.
     
  8. Chaty

    Chaty New Member

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    Looks like a cyst to me ...is she current on her wormer? I know I have had a cow with lumpy jaw and the vet cleaned it out and she was fine ...we wormed her and gave her antibiotics. I bet its a absess or a cyst. Find a different vet if you can that will check it better for you...dont remember goats getting lumpy jaw.
     
  9. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    you need to have two people and put a pvc pipe in the mouth between the back teeth so they can't bite you then ck around the gum and area for splinters/hay etc.
    Chaty they can get lumpy jaw from heavy worm loads but this does appear to be that.
     
  10. Qvrfullmidwife

    Qvrfullmidwife New Member

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    What is "lumpy jaw"?! Is that common vernacular for CL?
     
  11. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    OOPS was thinking bottle jaw
     
  12. Chaty

    Chaty New Member

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    It is treatable


    Lumpy jaw

    Actinomycosis or lumpy jaw produces immovable hard swellings on the upper and lower jawbones of cattle, commonly at the central molar level. It is caused by an anaerobic micro-organism, Actinomyces bovis. The fungus invades tissue through breaks in the lining of the mouth caused by eating rough forage. The tumor-like swellings develop slowly and may take several months to reach a noticeable size. Lumpy jaw may be well advanced before external signs are visible. The lumps consist of honeycombed masses of thin bone filled with yellow pus. If neglected the swellings may become very large. In advanced cases openings develop and discharge small amounts of sticky pus containing gritty yellow granules.

    Difficult breathing due to involvement of the nasal bones may be the first sign. As the disease progresses, chewing becomes more difficult and painful, resulting in loss of condition. Occasionally, the soft tissues of the head and alimentary tract can be involved. Lesions in the alimentary tract give vague symptoms of indigestion, often with chronic bloat.

    The most common treatments are iodine therapy or tetracyclines. Treatment is often ineffective. If the disease is detected early, it may be better to dispose of the animal while it is still in good condition. Only the head should be condemned by meat inspectors, unless the lesions have spread elsewhere in the body.
     
  13. The only salivary cyst we've had in the herd was on a older wether. It was just suddenly there one morning. About as big as the one in the pic. It was HARD, not squishy. Cow vet, checked him out.. pronounced it just a cyst. Said we could drain it or let it go. Joe was so horrid to hang on to (he has big horns) we just turn him loose and let him live with it. He ate just fine, didn't seem to bother him at all. One day about three months later, it just started to go down a bit. Finally one day it was just gone.
    susie
     
  14. Bella Star

    Bella Star New Member

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    Don't panic,but I would have that spot checked Quick.... have the vet aspirate some stuff from the lump and check it before putting her down as this makes 2 that you have had and you need to know what you are dealing with in your herd before your possible loose even more goats ...... Call vets in your area that are for livestock and ask if you bring in your goat , can he do a aspiration on contents of a lump on her jaw and test for what problem you are having... Get answers before that knot pops !!!.... and possibly spreads
     
  15. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    I am kind of an authority on Salivary cysts :) as are everyone who visits my farm and gets to see and feel of Birdy :) The are soft and squishy and you can move spit freely through them.

    With where it is, I would have it looked at. The only way you will know if it is CL is to have the material inside it tested...send the material to UC Davis. When approaching the vet tell them upfront that you want this tested for CL (Cornybacterium Pseudo-tuberculosis) and don't let them lance it and tell you it is nothing. If it goes into the mouth and is connected to a bad molar (I have one of these right now in my barn, she is going on antibiotics after she kids and then if it doesn't go away the tooth will be pulled) But you can smell her abscessed molar with her horrible breath (decay). If she does test positive for CL from the material, put her down and yes you can eat her with careful butchering looking for internal abscess. If she is negative, than let the vet lance it and clean it up well.

    Just don't not do anything...if CL it will burst, either internal or external and you will be infecting your place, other goats and it will hurt your sales as you have to disclose you have CL. Vicki
     
  16. hmmmm... soft & squishy.. now I wonder if Joe even had a cyst? maybe it was a thorn (which is what I thought it was went I called the vet) vet thought it was a cyst.... that was a couple years ago. Once it was gone, it never came back. It didn't burst on the outside, think it was inside his mouth. Learn something new every day.. thank you Vicki.
    susie, mo ozarks
     
  17. marytx

    marytx New Member

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    Today I had Mallory down to the vet clinic, and saw a different vet than last time. He examined it closely, also checking lymph nodes.

    He did not think it was cl, but rather thought it was probably an abcessed tooth. He did not feel anything like a splinter or burr.

    He did draw out fluid, which will be cultured, and squirt in some antiseptic. He didn't want to lance on the outside chance of it being cl.

    He suggested that I switch from Penicillin to Biomycin, and give it for three days, and he'll call me next week when the culture comes in.

    Oh, and he did suggest that I separate her until then, which I have done.

    Thanks for all advice. I'll let y'all know how this turns out.

    mary
     
  18. marytx

    marytx New Member

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    the culture came back today, negative. :biggrin
    Vet thinks we can wait a couple of weeks to see if the problem resolves itself, since it does not appear to be bothering her.
    mary
     
  19. susie

    susie New Member

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    Good news!!

    Susie