Lump on Udder

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Thermopkt, Jun 8, 2008.

  1. Thermopkt

    Thermopkt New Member

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    This is just not my year. :/ One doe has probable staff infection and now my other one has a lump. It is right where the teat joins the udder. It wasn't there in the morning, then, there it was in the evening. This was Thurs night, I believe. It's roughly pea sized. Kind of feels like it's between the skin and the udder wall. She does seem to be a little tender on that side. Keeps lifting her leg when touched on that side. Temp of 103, which is what she's pretty much been running the last few months. Appetite still good. She is a nubian, 3 yr old, 2nd freshener and nursing two kids. Any ideas? Could it be just a cyst?
     
  2. Nancy

    Nancy New Member

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    It could be a cyst. I had a doe that had one too, and it stayed there it never bothered her. Does it feel like it can move. It could be a milk stone.
    Silvia
     

  3. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    I know when you are newer and only have a few does that every single lump or bump or staph infection, or pinkeye etc...is a crisis. They really aren't. It could be a bite, a milk cyst, a small calcium deposit. Most of the time leaving stuff alone is better than treatments that can aggrevate things...like staph :) Wait and watch to see what happens. Vicki
     
  4. Thermopkt

    Thermopkt New Member

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    I assume I should keep an eye on her temp and milk and such still. Mostly I don't want things to turn into a crisis and I'm not sure I'd recognize one yet. :) Thanks you guys, really!!!!
     
  5. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    A cyst that will be masitis, or is walled off mastitis I guess would be a better way of putting it, is in the udder. Most of the time you can feel them but you can not see them "Here feel this'". It can also be just a blow out of a milkline, and it is perfectly harmless, thy usually stay soft. Harder and it is usually just a calcium deposit and does can have them for years and they never move, and judges do not discount for this either they are that common.

    Yes, just watch her, don't go mashing on it too much causing swellings that wouldn't have happened had you left it alone. Vicki
     
  6. Thermopkt

    Thermopkt New Member

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    I think she's getting staff, or whatever it is that the other doe has, in spite of my precautions. Anyway, I think I can deal with that now, but she gets these lumps that you can feel inside and then they (all 2 so far) develop a head. There's one big one developing further up the udder. The other doe didn't develop this way. You wouldn't hardly feel a thing, just there would be a boil there between one time and the next. Is this just the difference between the two does, or would this one be more likely to have the staff go internal? Can it even do that?
    Her temp is staying the same, normal, and she's eating fine, just tender on that side, so I'm not panicking.........................yet.
     
  7. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    As it comes to a head can you collect the exude and send it in for testing? I am going to slaughter this but acitomydes pyogenes comes to mind if they are deep in the udder then come to head. Staph is not like that at all. I am just getting over dealing with soremouth in a doe here that I did not fully quaranteen like normal because she came back wtih goats of mine at my business partners farm. Until she came down with soremouth I totally forgot she had never been on my farm or recieved vaccinations or colostrum here. On her nose, one her dew claws, on her udder it was awful, she is better won't be 100% until next year when her skin has time to heal, no showing for her this year. But with the looks of some of it on her rear udder I also sent in scrapings to make sure I was only dealing with soremouth that got some staph on it, and pemphgus on her dew claws. Vicki
     
  8. Thermopkt

    Thermopkt New Member

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    What is that stuff? That acitomydes pyogenes? Can the vet test it, or do I send it to a lab?
     
  9. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    You need a lab. Just mess with the spelling and google it, it is also part of a vaccination with mycoplasma and ecoli if that will help you find it. It's lumps under the skin in the meat of the udder from just one or two to the udder being riddled with them, very contagious although it only goes through the milking string. vicki
     
  10. Thermopkt

    Thermopkt New Member

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    What will this do to the kids that are nursing off of her if she has this?
     
  11. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    I have no idea sorry, do a search. It was part of what was tested for, for export and we vaccinated for it a long time ago. I don't let kids nurse so I wouldn't know that info anyway. Vicki
     
  12. Feral Nature

    Feral Nature Active Member

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    I copied and pasted this from this link: http://www.nmconline.org/articles/arcano.htm

    Arcanobacterium pyogenes Infections Difficult to Eliminate

    From the NMC Newsletter "Udder Topics", April, 1999

    Arcanobacterium pyogenes (formerly Actinomyces pyogenes) often cause severe clinical mastitis characterized by thick, purulent secretion. The foul odor sometimes associated with this condition is probably caused by anaerobic bacteria that are also present but not detected by routine cultural methods. The disease is most frequent in dry cows or heifers before or at the time of calving, and occasionally occurs in lactating animals as a sequel to teat or udder injury.

    Prognosis is poor once an infection is established. Antibiotic therapy of A. pyogenes infections is usually ineffective, and cows often lose the function of the affected quarter. Sources include wound infections, teat injuries, udder infections, abscesses, and genital tracts. Spread appears due to contact of teats with a contaminated environment, such as calving areas and dry cow housing. Arcanobacterium pyogenes may also be transmitted by flies. Mastitis caused by A. pyogenes is more common in humid weather. In Great Britain and northern Europe, the disease is common in dry cows and heifers maintained on pasture and is known as "summer mastitis."

    Control measures include fly control programs, maintaining cows in clean and dry calving areas, drying up affected quarters to reduce the risk of spreading the infection to other cows, and removing affected cows from the herd.

    Sources: NMC publications "Current Concepts of Bovine Mastitis" (1996) and "Laboratory Handbook on Bovine Mastitis" (in press)
     
  13. Feral Nature

    Feral Nature Active Member

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    There is lots on google if you use the alternate name :D
     
  14. Thermopkt

    Thermopkt New Member

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    So Arcanobacterium pyogenes is the same thing acetamides pyogenes? This stuff sounds nasty. So far, there are two small sores that remind me of what I think is staff in my other doe. Then there is one big nasty one that drains pus all the time. It is very tender. Otherwise, she seems fine. Milk looks good, tastes ok when I check it. We're not drinking it due to allergies and immune problems, but I taste it to check for off taste. She's eating well, no abnormal temp, etc.
    Sounds like antibiotics wouldn't have much effect. From what I can find so far, it would take 2-4 weeks to culture it. I don't really want to wait that long.

    I'm off to do some research on arcanobacterium pyogenes, actinomyces pyogenes and acetamydes pyogenes.
    They're all the same thing, really?
     
  15. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    See I am so old I didn't even know there was a new name :) Worse was when Lysigin changed its name... it used to be Stomata Staph...folks thought I had lost my mind once again and I was young then!!! Lets see...Fural used to be Furox or is it the other way around :) Vicki
     
  16. coso

    coso Guest

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    You got that one right Vicki :biggrin :rofl
     
  17. Thermopkt

    Thermopkt New Member

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    Ok, I'm slow, but here's some pics from two days ago.

    Sore #1
    [​IMG]

    Sore #1 from a different angle

    [​IMG]

    Sore # 2

    [​IMG]

    There was a big lump just to the front of the teat in pic#1. You can't see it in the pic, but now it has erupted. It oozes everytime she is milked. I will try and get a pic of it tomorrow. The sore #2 popped and scabbed over, looks like #1 now. Do these help any at all?
     
  18. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Those are not big lumps girl :)

    It's just staph dermatitis. The more you leave it alone the better off she will be. Just keep her skin clean, and don't use anything harsh. Imagine what your breasts would look like if you started going braless :) This is a non issue, not even sure this classifies as a bump :) Vicki
     
  19. Thermopkt

    Thermopkt New Member

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    I know these ones aren't big. The one that you can't see in these pics is about the size of a super ball. And it oozes pus constantly. Almost makes me wonder if I have two different issues going on here. It acts different than these two. It started as a large lump inside and then erupted and won't scab over. These two scabbed over. I've been doing the same thing as with my other doe. Wipe down, milk and spray with chlorhex. And, yes, I know I scare easily. :blush But there is nobody, and I do mean NOBODY, around me who knows goats. Or even has goats. You guys are all I got. :biggrin No pressure or anything :really

    And I promise I'll laugh and shake my head at myself in ten years or so. :)

    ETA: Good to know what the little ones are for sure, thanks!