Large teat and weird discharge

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by haeema, Feb 11, 2008.

  1. haeema

    haeema New Member

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    My doe is due to kid 2/15. Last week, I noticed that one teat was very large and hard. When I put her in the stand, I noticed that she had a VERY thick discharge coming out of it. I read on the forum and was thinking she may have mastitis. So, we milked it out with her kicking and screaming. Never felt so sorry for anything in my life. The discharge was NOT colostrum. IT was was thick as utter balm and had an off color to it. It didn't stink. However, her teat has a large not in it and I don't' know what to do with her now. Someone told me that once she kids, I need to put "TODAY" in her teats.

    What do you think?
     
  2. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Hi and welcome to the forum. Large teats like this, are usually caused by not being milked when a good milker. Having kids milking one half while the pressure in the udder blows out the orifice and into the teat. The end of the teat can't hold milk so the teat blows. Also injury, swinging udders can get stepped on when a heavy doe tries to stand up, or can get stepped on by other does.

    The thick discharge is not mastitis. The orifice up inside the teat that is supposed to hold the milk back is likely weak, so instead of just a plug being made in the orifice and the teat inside...karatrin plug, hers is filled inside of the whole teat since it is blown. Just make sure you teat dip her, but do milk her out after she kids even if you do keep the kids on her, the kids could not have milked out all this waxy plug. And the waxy plug is completly normal, hers is just more because of the problem with her teat. Vicki
     

  3. Melissa

    Melissa New Member

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    Vicki, why would being milked hurt her so bad if it is just a blown orifice? I've seen plenty of does with this problem and it didn't seem to hurt them being milked?

    -Melissa
     
  4. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    We just milk out a thin toothpick size amount of keratin, she is likely milking out alot. Also is the doe tame, used to being milked? Likely not with a blown teat. It's one thing to have big teats, they would be even, honestly takes some misstreatment to blow one teat, so her previous care is questionable anyway. My doe Debut was misstreated, she was allowed to nurse one doe kid at home 3, and when you peak at 14pounds, it's criminal not to milk her. She was very touchy about being milked after that, I was home 4, by hand, although she was fine on the machine. Vicki
     
  5. Melissa

    Melissa New Member

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    hmm, maybe what I always saw was just "big teats" and not blown orifices as it was usually both teats. so Trudy, is the doe in question used to being milked? inquiring minds need to know. lol.

    -Melissa
     
  6. haeema

    haeema New Member

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    MY BAD, I fogot to tell you this doe is a FIRST FRESHENER! She has never been milked because she has never kidded. Before she was ever exposed to the buck, this left teat was filling up with milk, not a plug, actual white milk. I think that is why that teat started being longer than the right one (which had not milk at all). I didn't know whether to milk it out or not because she never was pregnant or even exposed at that time. A friend of mine had said that having milk before freshening the first time was a good thing and the doe would be a good milker. I didn't try to milk it out. If this happens again with my ff's before they are exposed to the buck, should I go ahead and milk her? Will it bring her to full milk? This is something I have never experianced before. My thoughts were since I didn't milk her out and now she is due in 2 days, this thick stuff may have turned into mastitis. My test strips say it's not mastitis. Do you still think it is keratin?
     
  7. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    I honestly feel that if it's hormonal that bring on lactation in a virgin doe...percocious udder, than it would come in evenly and not lopsided. So since for me this is not hormonal, I would bet it is mastitis. When she kids, milk her out, if you are letting kids nurse I would not let a doeling nurse this doe. Staph mastitis is passed from dam to daughter exactly like this. LSU still does free mastitis screening (in goatkeeping 101) I would send in samples from both sides when she comes into milk (not colostrum). Staph does not show positive until it becomes staph aureous in CMT or Dr Naylors cards (a waste of money). Always send in milk samples on anything abnormal and milk in one half of an udder is abnormal. Vicki