Lambar buckets

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by fmg, Jan 3, 2012.

  1. fmg

    fmg New Member

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    Does anybody use the buckets with nipples at the bottom that hang on a fence? What are the advantages and disadvantage vs. the nipples with tubes going to the bottom? Are the bottom-nippled buckets leaky?

    The bucket I am talking about is this: http://www.hoeggerfarmyard.com/xcart/Rhinehardt-Nipple-Multi-Kid-Feeder.html. There are other types of nipples you can get with it as well.
     
  2. fattyaddie

    fattyaddie New Member

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    I use the one with the nipples on the bottom! From my experience the kids take to it better, there seems to be alot of air with the tubes.
     

  3. fmg

    fmg New Member

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    Another sort of related question. Does anybody teach their kids to drink out of a bucket/trough when they are a little older? I know it is important for them to suck for milk not to go in the rumen at first, but once their rumen is functioning well enough, can they be switched to drinking milk rather than nursing it, just for easier clean up?
     
  4. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    The nipples at the bottom of buckets leak, especially as the kids slam into them and pull when they suck. I don't see how there can be air in the lambar buckets if you fill them up. IF you aren't going to put 5 gallons of milk into a 5 gallon bucket than simply make a smaller 2 or 3 gallon bucket lambar....I have used lambars for 26 years...I make small 1 gallon ones for kidding pens and 2 gallon ones for 4 kids and 3.5 gallon ones for 8 kids and still have my old 5 gallon lambar bucket that feeds 8 kids with it's old welded to the tire rim setup, just haven't had that many kids for a long time to use it (thank god).

    Sucking is important because it adds saliva/acid to the milk, but yes once the kids are up and eating grain you of course can put out buckets of milk....everyone has had a kid who is super interested in the milk bucket while out in the milkroom and especially if you had the buckets the same color as your lambar buckets. You do what you have to do :)
     
  5. buckrun

    buckrun New Member

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    How funny you asked that Nancy- I was just mulling over why no one ever talks about bucket feeding. We always taught all the bucklings to drink out of porcelain dishpans- ole timey shallow things? Does anyone remember those? They circled around and slurped it down. We did it as soon as they were up good and had colostrum because they were all just for meat. It gets to be too much fiddlin for not much return when you have lots of them and this is so quick and easy and they grew just fine.

    They were so intent of competing once they figured it out that they stood stock still and never moved until the dish was empty. Never turned one over once they learned there was a finite amt.
    I read that if you place the dish at sternum height on a support they are less likely to choke but we never had an issue with that once they got the hang of it. To get them startedwe cupped our palms in the milk and they would suck our milk covered fingers and then get a stream going and they learned it pretty fast. Wow it was so easy!
    Lee
     
  6. carlidoe

    carlidoe New Member

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    I love that one! It held up really well and didn't leak a drop unless a nipple was torn. I fed 5 doelings with the same bucket for 5 months and only replaced 3 or 4 nipples during that time. I never had to replace the little rubber gasket ring or anything. I'm going to use the same kind this year.
     
  7. fmg

    fmg New Member

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    I will keep that in mind for my cull bucklings-thanks Lee! Carli-Do you have the same kinds of nipples, or one of the other varieties?
     
  8. carlidoe

    carlidoe New Member

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    I use the Rhinehardt nipples. They are really soft and flexible. I can also stretch them over a wine bottle if I need to.
     
  9. Aja-Sammati

    Aja-Sammati Active Member

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    I have never had the desire to use pans because of chickens & flies...since I free feed, I don't know how I could keep them out of the milk. Yuck!
     
  10. buckrun

    buckrun New Member

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    Michelle that is an unwarranted assumption. Sorry I did not make it clear I wasn't free feeding. You don't leave milk pans around for flies and IMO people who run chickens with their goats are just nasty. Chickens are nasty. Seriously nasty and Goats are not. They don't belong together except in Beverly Hillbi-lly shows.

    You feed them-it takes all of 5 minutes- you pick up the pan- they go off to eat something else until the next time. I fed enough that we had an average of 45 pound 8 week old wethers at weaning with little other input but pasture so it works. And sanitation is only an issue if you make it one. I had all the pans clean and hanging on the wall of the back porch far quicker than you could clean up a lambar or bottles. I expected 5 pounds a week growth and got it with this method.

    We never free feed milk. We want them on real food asap.
    The longer you poke their bellies full of milk shutting off hunger signals the longer it takes to get them ruminating and getting to the point of getting actual caloric intake from something other than milk. I was selling milk so that was my goal. Get them eating so they don't miss the milk. I did not have extra to waste on making meat.
    It was making money :biggrin
    Lee
     
  11. lonestrchic23

    lonestrchic23 New Member

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    Why is running chickens with goats nasty?

    Mine free range, though they don't have access to the does pen or my milking area.

    They do frequent the buck pen though (now that my chicken killing goat is gone) & were great at eating the wasp that tried swarming the water buckets...... The does had an awful time of it this summer because the chickens had no access to their pen & the wasp were awful there.....

    I agree chickens are nasty..... But as long as they can't mess on hay, feed or in the milking area, I don't see a problem with them running with goats.
     
  12. PrairieTrail45

    PrairieTrail45 New Member

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    I used a caprine feeder last year and it worked very well. I think you can buy one way valves for the tubes to keep the milk in the tube, so when the kid stops sucking the milk won't go back out. That is supposed to make it easier to get the kids to start on the lambar. I don't have any of those, but was wondering if they helped or not.

    Can't chickens spread salmonella to goats? I'm not for sure, but I think they can... They also seem to be horrible at roosting in the best places and pooping all over everything. We have a few chickens, but they don't go in the goat pen. We also have a couple guineas and I can say we didn't have one tick on our goats, dogs, horses, or cows this last summer. Everyone else we knew was having a horrible time keeping the ticks at bay, but we didn't. I think the guineas helped with that.
     
  13. buckrun

    buckrun New Member

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    My experience with chickens is they are fabulous living in a place especially made for them with grazing and shelter and a laying house and night coop that is easily cleaned. They are a great addition to any homestead. In their own space.

    We thought it might be cool to have them scratch around in the goat runs to break up manure and eat spilled grain.
    It is just not worth the mess they make. They get in the feeders with poopy feet - then I have to clean feeders before I can feed- no thanks- they walk in the hay racks and the goats won't eat anything they have been near with their poopy feet. My feed and my time is worth too much to have it trashed by chickens loose with my goats. And there is nothing more disgusting that squished chicken poop on my Keens ;)

    I have seen it work to have them run in pastures together with animals on graze only but ours congregated where we feed and would not go looking for grasshoppers and etc but instead always looking for that one dropped oat and then scratching up such as storm they toss dirt on everything and then hopping up in the hay to lay an egg I won't find till a goat breaks it with poopy feet ruining stuff my goats would be eating. No way. Nasty. Just nasty.
    Now don't get me wrong. I love chickens. But in a chicken yard. NOT with my goats. Been there- hate that :/
    Lee
     
  14. buckrun

    buckrun New Member

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    And I forgot roosting on the back of the tractor seat....nuff said....
     
  15. lonestrchic23

    lonestrchic23 New Member

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    LOL, I agree with you there. :)

    The reasons you listed are why my chickens can't go in my doe pen...... They'd mess in the alfalfa pellets, and I'd have a fit if they messed on my milk stand! I have a round bale out for the girls & if the chickens could get close to it, I know they'd lay eggs on it, or mess all over it.....

    My bucks have a hay feeder the chickens can't get above, & they can't get in or above the grain feeder either, so I don't care if they go in there. If there was a chance of them soiling the hay or feed though, the buck pen would be off limits too....

    I don't have a chicken coop..... The birds (12) have access to a lean to, 2 acres & my rabbit room (rabbit cages hung from rafters where the chickens can't get on top). If I had to clean a chicken coop, I wouldn't have chickens, lol (cleaning up chicken poo is almost as bad as cleaning up after pigs in my book, ick) They usually roost in the pecan trees, or in the lean to if it's wet out. I know, I'm a bad chicken owner, lol but they've lasted this long, and no loses despite the multiple bobcat sightings so I don't fret over it much.
     
  16. Aja-Sammati

    Aja-Sammati Active Member

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    I think you made an unwarranted assumption, too, Lee! My kids do eat 'real' food, very quickly, and they are also free fed milk, often they prefer their hay to their milk. Like I mentioned in another post recently...I can name herds of lovely animals that run a complete range of management options...all of them grow out productive and beautiful animals. There is no one right way to raise goats. It is very much an individual decision, based on what part of the country you live in and your personality/lifestyle.

    I haven't met the fence that will keep my free range chickens out of any goat pen, and I am not going out to spend a fortune trying to find one, either! Only a handful brave the doe pens anyway. The chickens do not get into my feeders and make messes, but I do not feed pellets, only hay, so that may be why. They do clean fly larvae out of bedding. Geese are much nastier than chickens- especially if they get into your milk barn- yuck! I have never had a goat get salmonella, or had any milk culture with salmonella. Some day when I get my hands on the 250 grand I need to open the dairy, the chickens will go into a high security area, until then, I don't waste my time chasing them down.

    Feeding in pans would be great in some instances, but I prefer the ease and convenience of running to town for the day while having an ice pack in a full, covered bucket at home. Personal choices :biggrin
     
  17. buckrun

    buckrun New Member

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    Yes for sure! As many ways to do as there are goatherds :)
    Our management at that time was based on selling milk not selling goats so the priorities were quite different.
    We have no climb dog wire which keeps chickens out and isn't that expensive just in case you don't want to wait for that 250 grand ;)

    Let me know when you get it tho and I will come work for you :biggrin
    Lee
     
  18. fmg

    fmg New Member

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    In gorgeous Northern California, no less. :D
     
  19. SANDQ

    SANDQ Senior Member

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    Ive used non return valves when feeding calves, on an extensive system. We built the system first without them and the poor little things had a real struggle getting a constant suplly of milk when feeding. After installing the valves, it was so much better, firstly for the calves, as they were not struggling to drink, and also not gulping large amounts of air into them in the process. For us, the benefits were feeding time went alot quicker after that, as obviously you dont have to wait as long for the animals to drink.