Inflations, hoses, and bucket questions

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by whimmididdle, Apr 16, 2008.

  1. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    I'm looking for mostly sanitary and maintenance practices that you folks practice.

    My machine parts should be in this week, so I will be starting on my milker very soon.

    I'm up on pump, and vacuum tank maintenance.........also on most cleaning practices too.
    I'm looking for tips on how to store the inflations, hoses, and bucket, between milkings.
    Do you hand dry after washing them ? Do you let them air dry after that ? Do you rinse them out again before heading back out to the barn for the next round of milking ? Where/how do you store them between milkings......and how do you store them in the "off" season.?
    Any tips on how to get the most longevity out of these parts would be helpful too.


    Thanks in advance, Whim
     
  2. mill-valley

    mill-valley New Member

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    I let everything air dry after washing. Before the next milking I spray a very dilute chlorine solution over everything and don't rinse. I bring everything into the house to dry and it stays on the counter until next milking. As far as in between seasons...I don't know yet as I just got mine about 6 weeks ago.
     

  3. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    HEY, WHIM!!! Ya' gettin' tired of milking those itty bitty nigie teats by hand? :peepwall

    After washing, I hang my inflations, lines, and lid on a hook over the sink in the barn. Air dry. The delaval bucket has a handle that just fits over the edge of my dairy sink and it's turned upside down facing into the sink. Since the only time my bucket comes into the house is to be run through the dishwasher, before I milk I'll run about 1/2 a bucket of warm water through the inflations, hoses, and swish it around inside the bucket. Then dump. This cleans any dust or grit that might have gotten in them between milking. Every 4th milking while I'm cleaning up, I'll run a dairy acid wash through the lines and bucket. This keeps down milkstone.
    And no, I don't hand dry the bucket! Are you kidding....I don't even do that to the dishes in the house. ;) I've got a dishwasher.

    Another thing I do, and I'm not even sure it helps...but copying dairies. When I get the lid and lines hung on the hook, I place the hose attached to faucet in the sink, in the hole in lid and backflush my lines and inflations. The inflations are in the sink. Shake the inflations good to get the water out of my claws. DONE.
    Now, if you need this explained in more detail...just ask. :lol
    Kaye

    P.S. Did you order a cable brush to scrub your lines??? I just love mine. Pull that brush through my lines about every 3 days.
     
  4. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    """HEY, WHIM!!! Ya' gettin' tired of milking those itty bitty nigie teats by hand?""""

    :rofl It's them durn FF teats that's gettin to me. My finger joints just ain't what they used to be.....and old Paige is giving me a dirty look this year too. SO !

    I guess my concern with this line of questions, is that I live down here where moss can grow on a dry rock over night. I just don't won't something growing in my "stuff" between milkings.
    Geez...there's a lot of stuff to learn about keeping healthy teats/udders while using these milkers. I'm on the burned teat ends chapter now.

    Thanks for any more tips about this......

    Whim
     
  5. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    I wash a 2 gallon bucket of dishwashing liquid (the machien kind because it's low suds) through my lines into my bucket...and then bleach water...1/4 cup bleach to 1 gallon of water (in another bucket)....so the soapy water sheets out the milk an the bleach water disenfects but bigger is that it keeps down the pink mold I will get in my lines. I do like Kaye and my lines, lid and inflations all get looped over a hook above my sink in the milkroom area, I do rinse off the outside of my inflations and rubber parts of my lines because bleach is hard on them....next milking I simply backflush with water, through the lines, in case dust etc gets in them. Every 3 days or so, I pop open my inflations from the shells and soak them in weak bleach and soak my air hose from the machine to the lid...they get icky quick from our humid air, and even though it doesn't touch the milk, it looks bad. Only if I am going to mow or weedeat to I actually cover up my milking equipment. Vicki
     
  6. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    Thanks Yaw'll
    I assume when you rinse the "stuff" out right before the next round of milking......that you just kinda try to shake any excess water out that might be in it.....and then not worry if there's a few drops of water in the system that may get sucked in with the milk. ???

    Whim
     
  7. Cotton Eyed Does

    Cotton Eyed Does New Member

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    This is my system:
    When I go out to milk I flip on the hot water heater and make my rinse bucket up. A bucket of water with a "glug" of bleach and a "shake" of auto dish washing powder in it. This is to dip the inflations in between does. I take my bucket off the rack and set it on the dairy room floor and put the lid on it. Bring the girls in, wash the udder and attach the inflations and milk. Let that girl out and the next one in. Rinse the inflations between the does in the rinse bucket and hang them up to drip until the next girl is ready to milk. Repeat this until I am done milking. Then I pour up my milk into my tote. Put the lid back on my milk bucket and suck the soapy bleach water up through my milk lines into the bucket. Then I make a clear bucket of hot water and suck that up through the lines to rinse them out. I have 2 bungy cords hanging from a rafter with a wire calf bottle holder attached to the end of it. That is where I hang my lines and inflations to drip dry above my bucket. I pick up my bucket with the soapy bleach water in it and take it over to the sink where I use a big scrub brush to wash the bucket out. Pour that dirty water out and put fresh hot rinse water in and scrub again, rinse again and then turn the bucket upside down on the rack to dry. Bucket and lines are clean and ready to go for the next milking. I don't cover mine up either. The only thing I do is dip the inflations in the rinse bucket to get off any dust that may have settled on them and hang them up to drip before I start milking.
     
  8. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    Nope, don't worry about clean water at all. There's not enough left in the lines/inflations to make an impact on the milk quality.

    I'd worry more if there was moisture left from the last milking. Especially in this heat/humidity. Reason for the backflush with clean water.
    Kaye
     
  9. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    :biggrin Thanks again
    I'm sure I'll be back on here in a few days, asking yaw how to convince a doe that those 2 thangs hanging off her teats, ain't 2 rattlesnakes. This orta be fun. :crazy I may have to build me some blinders like you used to see on old plow mules.

    Whim
     
  10. mill-valley

    mill-valley New Member

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    It's pretty funny seeing the looks on their faces....although mine were more worried about the looks and sound of the pump than the actual "attachment."
     
  11. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    I do exactly as Vicki have never had mold in my lines
    Also I have a bucket of the bleach water to dip my inflations in between milkers shake good hang up to finish dipping while getting the next doe ready to be milked.
     
  12. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    :rofl Whim, it's this kind of a demented sense of humor that we all tend to get this time of year! Especially when FF are concerned! :rolleyes
    I actually enjoyed watching my FF Saanen. She's kind of a fruitcake, anyway! Got her on the milkstand, all prepped (she actually squatted like she should!) then I put both inflations on at the same time. YAHOOOO, her butt went about 2' in the air, head shot up out of feed and she screamed! :really Then when she decided..."Hey, this ain't all bad", she stuck her face back in the feed and hasn't bothered with that rodeo again.
    :twisted But I won a bet with DH that that would probably be her reaction!
    Kaye
     
  13. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    :rofl :rofl :rofl Atta girl Kaye.......as long as his money is green, take it. He should know better than to make bets with you with it comes to goats anyhow.

    I said that about the snakes, cause my old queen flat hates them......A black snake can cross the yard, and it's some of the awfulest snorting and stumping that you've ever heard. Good thing is....I know when there's a snake any where around here.

    Parts came in, and a couple things were wrong..........so, I've got to send it back and start over again. Maybe a couple more weeks before I get it together now. :down

    Whim
     
  14. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    :rofl By the time you get the thing going...milking season will be OVER! But, don't sweat the small stuff...it took me about a year to get everthing like I wanted it! 4 yrs. to FINALLY get a vaccum pump that I'm happy with! Now, milking a breeze and just let them FF freshen with little teats! ON THE MACHINE with you, girly!

    You'll love it when you get it going!
    Kaye