If you compost your goat bedding...

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Madeleine M., Feb 23, 2008.

  1. Madeleine M.

    Madeleine M. New Member

    105
    0
    0
    how long do you let it "age"? We are getting the stalls completely cleaned out in anticipation of having kids. We put the bedding in a garden bed thinking that it would be ready to plant in next spring or fall at the earliest.

    The thing is that some plants are volunteering there which must mean that the goat bedding is not too hot. How long would you wait before planting in that spot?
     
  2. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

    9,442
    0
    0
    You don't have to wait at all with goat or rabbit manure
     

  3. rrziga

    rrziga New Member

    15
    0
    0
    Wow, that is super great to know!!! I learn new things everytime I get on the forum. I am glad you asked the question. Now all I need to figure out is how I am going to get it over to the garden! :crazy
     
  4. coso

    coso Guest

    I usually pile it up by the garden in a big pile and let it compost some. Have a tractor with a front end loader and turn it ever once in a while. I usually keep two piles going. I leave one to compost down until it is basically used to cover seeds with. The other I use for mulch. I have taken it straight out of the barn and mulched with it before never has burned anything.
     
  5. ecftoggs

    ecftoggs New Member

    224
    0
    0
    We completely clean out our barn usually in January and the big pile sits on my garden until they are able to haul it to the fields sometime before the fieldwork begins. With all of the snow and rain that is on it during that time quite a bit of the nutirents are leached into my garden and I always have a great crop. Goat manure is great and can't imagine my garden not getting it.
    I've never had any problem planting young plants and burning them. Since we are talking gardens does that mean that Spring can be far behind. Getting pretty tired of the below zero temps in Iowa!
    Mary
     
  6. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

    9,442
    0
    0
    agree composting is ideal but doesn't have to be composted to use or put on your garden now. I pile mine all up outside a goat pen and then when I want to use it I use my lawn tractor and trailer or just haul by hand in buckets.
     
  7. Jo@LaudoDeumFarm

    Jo@LaudoDeumFarm New Member

    336
    0
    0
    I usually allow the manure pile to compost for a year before I use it. This allows the hay to rot down into manageable pieces for me to fork. Something that can speed up the piles is a compost activator. This is just bacteria you mix with water and dump or spray on the pile. It really speeds it up.
    Gotta love that compost, and boy am I thinking about gardening right now. :D
     
  8. LMonty

    LMonty New Member

    442
    0
    0
    goat and sheep manures are "cold manures". it can be applied raw. if theres a lot of hay mixed in the bedding, you might want to compost to kill weed seeds from the hay, but the manure itself is pretty safe. straw shouldnt have the same weed seeds problem. Ive used it raw without problems quite often, tucked under mulch or side dressed on even young plants.
     
  9. Patty13637

    Patty13637 New Member

    876
    0
    0
    Yep we throw ours straight on the garden most of the time. We have yucky clay soil and are improving it year by year . Goat , rabbit go straight on Chicken ,Horses and cows go in a pile.

    Patty
     
  10. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

    16,497
    1
    0
    My big milkers pen doesn't have hay in the barn, they have to go around to another section of the barn for their hay. So I use their rakings straight on the beds. Anything with hay in the barn gets composted! I do raised beds and when I fill a new bed with fresh out of the barn manure and shavings, I simply make a small furrow, fill it with good soil and plant right into the soil when using seeds. When putting in plants they go right into the coarse bedding. Vicki
     
  11. Aja-Sammati

    Aja-Sammati Active Member

    1,004
    0
    36
    Ours has enough straw/hay in it to get very hot, steam rising out of the compost pile hot. It takes it about 3 weeks max to break down to the most beautiful 'dirt', though, which is much shorter than our horse manure.
     
  12. XCricketX

    XCricketX New Member

    23
    0
    0
    I didn't know you could use goat manure like that! I have rabbits... and have been using that... but I'm so glad to know about goat manure!

    Cricket